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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Folks:

I am not sure where I heard/read it and I am vague on the specifics, but the idea was that if you buy an uninterruptable power supply it will not only provide surge protection but will also do a fair amount of power line conditionning as well. I am not really concerned with an uninteruptable power source but power conditionning and surge protection seem sensible. Given the difference in price between an uninterruptable power supply and power conditionners (i.e., low versus astronomical), I think that the former is a great idea.


Can anyone confirm or debunk this?


Thanks in advance.
 

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I too had this idea several months ago and asked about it.


What I was told (and have since confirmed) was that the signal would be clean and offer great surge protection because it is being feed from a battery rather than directly from the outlet. However, while this helps on these two aspects it isn't practical for home theater because batteries can not respond quickly (or at all) to the high/low current demands or fluctuation involved. Batteries have a more or less set discharge rate and con not provide anywhere near the current an AC outlet can.


So, while UPSs might work great for computers and would probably be good devices for sources (DVD/CD players, VCRs, satellite boxes etc.) they would hinder the performance of the high current demand items (Receiver, Amp, Pre/Pro, Video Displays).


IMO you should stick with the power conditioner and be sure to get one that has "high current" circuits for your amp, receiver etc. The super outlet (I think that's the name) from PS Audio is a good one that isn't too expensive. Then you could get a UPS for your source devices since the Outlet only has two sockets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
kirknelson:

I should have stated that my monitor is a Samsung HLM 507W DLP. As far as I know, this does not have anywhere near the power demand of a CRT. So for me the uninterruptable power box (UPC) may still be a good option...
 

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mnilan, I think you mean UPS, not UPC. A UPC is the barcode on the back of packaging.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes! UPS is the correct acronym :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Folks:

I talked to a computer techie last night about this idea and his comment was that another advantage is that you could watch TV during a power outage ;) He also said that a UPS has to be replaced every two to three years. Anybody used one for that long to confirm? Of course, I am still looking for validation of the idea of using a UPS in place of a power conditionner and surge suppressor anyway...
 

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A sufficiently large, and expensive, "Smart"UPS that is line interactive (passes power while keeping batteries charged) and true sine wave output on batts, at the 2200VA range CAN work.

HERE is a 3-page AVS thread on this from August.


Be advised that UPS units are primarily for quite temporary power backup, and built-in surge suppression is secondary (they are smaller in protection levels than dedicated surge protectors). Since battery output is measured in mere minutes, SmartUPS are valuable not to keep HT watchable, but to have time to shut down the HT system, and also protect any set values in the tv monitor service menu should power failure reset them to factory default.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
norcalbill:

Thanks, an informative discussion. Any ideas about the durability of the UPS boxes?
 

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Batteries may have to be replaced as often every couple years. I installed some APC Smart UPSs 7 years ago. They're on the original batteries and are still running strong. The Smart UPS series will warn you if the batteries have problems (PC required for this feature).


Unless you go for lots of extra batteries or a large UPS run time on batteries isn't very long. TVs/projectors eat up a lot of watts as will large amplifiers.


During our first storm the power went out for a couple hours. I wasn't at home at the time. When I got home the Tivo was recording. A few minutes later the power came back on. Didn't miss a thing. :D
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by kirknelson
I too had this idea several months ago and asked about it.


What I was told (and have since confirmed) was that the signal would be clean and offer great surge protection because it is being feed from a battery rather than directly from the outlet. However, while this helps on these two aspects it isn't practical for home theater because batteries can not respond quickly (or at all) to the high/low current demands or fluctuation involved. Batteries have a more or less set discharge rate and con not provide anywhere near the current an AC outlet can.

Keep in mind that there are two types of UPS. A lot of the cheap UPS systems actually run your components directly off the AC line, and switch to battery a few milliseconds after a power fault. The other, more expensive type runs your components off the battery while constantly charging the battery simultaneously.
 

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I've had a UPS for my computer for about 6 years now. Don't know if I can change the battery or not. I have noticed that the battery seems to output less and less each year. I don't have it hooked up to the main computer I use anymore. Now it is connected to a backup computer in the middle of being rebuilt and to my alarm clock. I got tired of buying batteries for the alarm clock for when the power goes out. ;) Anyway, when the power goes out for a while, the clock will be off so I assume my battery is really worn out.


An old friend found and old expensive UPS sitting out in the hall on his way back to his apartment. He asked the guy who used to own it and the guy was throwing it out cause it didn't work anymore. My friend took it and bought a new battery for it ($50?) and it works great.
 

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as i recall the question was power conditioning or surge suppression. there were many responses for battery back up or UPS (some switch in nanoseconds others are always on the batters so to speak) devices. whatever these are 3 different animals (to confuse you abit some manufactures integrate these products. ex: some ups may have power conditioning and some power conditioner may offer surge) to choose from based on need.


anyway back to the question. a surge protector does just what the name says. it keeps surges from getting to your components. howerver most inject "noise" in the ac line, usually picked up in the neutral to ground. a power conditioner does just as its name implies. it "conditions" power. in other words it filters this ground noise some call common mode noise and provides mild surge protection. then of course there are power regulators which i think is what the monster and other products do. they filter power, protect against surges and reproduce a constant 120 at a set amperage to your equipment. these can be very expensive depending on the load.


it has been my best results going with power conditioners since power "quality" is more of a long term concern and most conditioners have some sort of surge protection. just have "replacement cost" insurance when lightning strikes... hehehehehehe.


later,

mike
 
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