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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So video cameras have a BNC video connector and then a seperate power connector.


What do you do when you want to wire up all your video cameras with a single run of CAT5 to each camera? Can you use one of the wire pairs for the power? If so, then what is the best way to wire it up at the source? Like if you have 4 or more cameras?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by IVB /forum/post/15420467


I use an Elk PD9 power distro for the power to each camera.

What cable do you run to each camera, from that distro unit? 2 conductor, 22 AWG? Do CCTV camera have screw terminals for power?


Thanks, IVB.


BTW, every time I see your signature, I read 'Intro to Headache' as I'm most familiar with that abbreviation.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad /forum/post/15426316


What cable do you run to each camera, from that distro unit? 2 conductor, 22 AWG? Do CCTV camera have screw terminals for power?


Thanks, IVB.

Nowadays I run 1 CAT5 for video signal and a 22/2 for power. I use these cheap ($17 each) baluns so that I can use one of the CAT5 pairs for video signal. The cameras don't have screw terminals for power rather the plug-in dealios, so I find the RatShack connector that'll fit into that, which have a plug-in connector on one side and 2 wires on the other. I use a multimeter to figure out how to connect wires so it's center-positive (which is what cameras use), then i'm good to go.

Quote:
BTW, every time I see your signature, I read 'Intro to Headache' as I'm most familiar with that abbreviation.

Ask me in 2 days after I try getting my Aprilaire to work with my automation system again; i may be pounding my head against the same wall.
 

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I'm a real noob when it comes to baluns, but isn't this just an adapter, and not a 'bal-un'?


Disclaimer: I've never touched a balun.


I just finished Lampen's 'Cable Installer's Pocket Guide' for the third time in a month (I'm a slow learner, dense material). Great read, cover to cover. Not a pocket reference guide, as marketed. Covers all the bases for A/V cable, geared toward the professional installer. Highly recommended.


I'm pretty sure there is no balanced signal involved in your CCTV setup. The manufacturer of that 'balun' tacked on another $10 with that descriptor.



Regardless, that's awesome.
 

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If you haven't locked yourself into a specific security camera yet, I would consider getting IP based security cameras which support PoE (power over Ethernet.) All you have to do is run a single Cat5/5e/6 cable to each camera which will provide both network connectivity and power on a single cable. All you need on the network side is a switch or router which has PoE support. You just have to make sure you don't exceed the power capacity of the switch or router when you sum up the total draw of all the cameras. If you don't want to spend for a new switch or router, you can buy individual pairs of PoE power injectors.


I purchased my network backbone switch with doing this in mind.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad /forum/post/15429251


I'm a real noob when it comes to baluns, but isn't this just an adapter, and not a 'bal-un'?


Disclaimer: I've never touched a balun.


I just finished Lampen's 'Cable Installer's Pocket Guide' for the third time in a month (I'm a slow learner, dense material). Great read, cover to cover. Not a pocket reference guide, as marketed. Covers all the bases for A/V cable, geared toward the professional installer. Highly recommended.


I'm pretty sure there is no balanced signal involved in your CCTV setup. The manufacturer of that 'balun' tacked on another $10 with that descriptor.



Regardless, that's awesome.

Yep, you're right, I just copied what the product was branded. I was actually torn about whether to copy over that inaccurate product name or not, but figured i'd go with consistency.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WonHung /forum/post/15429798


If you haven't locked yourself into a specific security camera yet, I would consider getting IP based security cameras which support PoE (power over Ethernet.) All you have to do is run a single Cat5/5e/6 cable to each camera which will provide both network connectivity and power on a single cable. All you need on the network side is a switch or router which has PoE support. You just have to make sure you don't exceed the power capacity of the switch or router when you sum up the total draw of all the cameras. If you don't want to spend for a new switch or router, you can buy individual pairs of PoE power injectors.


I purchased my network backbone switch with doing this in mind.

What I noticed is that IP based cameras are:

1) more expensive

2) fewer form factors available. A lot more selection in "standard" cameras.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by IVB /forum/post/15429206


Nowadays I run 1 CAT5 for video signal and a 22/2 for power. I use these cheap ($17 each) baluns so that I can use one of the CAT5 pairs for video signal.

There are some baluns that claim to do video, audio and power over one cat5e run. (see Ebay item 250328123965). $10 for a pair including shipping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by WonHung /forum/post/15429798


If you haven't locked yourself into a specific security camera yet, I would consider getting IP based security cameras which support PoE (power over Ethernet.) All you have to do is run a single Cat5/5e/6 cable to each camera which will provide both network connectivity and power on a single cable. All you need on the network side is a switch or router which has PoE support. You just have to make sure you don't exceed the power capacity of the switch or router when you sum up the total draw of all the cameras. If you don't want to spend for a new switch or router, you can buy individual pairs of PoE power injectors.


I purchased my network backbone switch with doing this in mind.


I hadn't considered that. Does the switch have to be on your LAN and connected to the router & a PC? Or can the switch just be connected to a bunch of video cameras only? I would feel weird about having my cameras "out there" where someone could hack into them.
 
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