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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,


I recently bought a sound bar and realized a slight buzz coming from the sub. However, it would go away if I unplugged the sub and then plugged it back in, but, I have to do this every time I turn the sound bar on. I did some research and not only found out about interference but, the importance of a good surge protector/power center. I am currently using a cheap surge protector and I want to upgrade. The house I live in is also pretty old and probably has outdated electrical wiring, not sure though. I am almost positive that I need a power center. Here is what I want to plug in.


Panasonic TC-P42S1 Plasma HDTV

Samsung HT-WS1G Sound bar with wireless sub (Plug for receiver and sub.

Xbox 360

PS3


Could anyone make a suggestion on what to get? I would really just like to get rid of that buzz, have clean power, etc. I don't want to be cheap but, don't want to get ripped off either. I was in Bestbuy and it seems anything with Monster on it costs quite a bit. Thanks a lot.


Currently looking at the Tripp Lite TLP810NET, it is about $36 from Amazon. Thanks again for any help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I see, thank you. My biggest thing is understanding what I need. I've been doing a ton of research and I am still just flat out unsure. There are so many brands, types, etc.
 

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^^ .. good idea; i have a cheap RS laptop (imitation) surge "connector". it has two small 'green' lights, one of which 'suggest' proper grounding. that or some other device may be in order to check.


another thing i thought of is polarity of speaker connections; are they connected Red/Right speaker, White/Left speaker or something close. i thought if they were out of sequence, that could also cause feedback.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I did the test where I unplugged everything except the sub and the buzz is still there. Also, the power strip I have is showing the green light for grounded. Also, the buzz is pretty high pitched, which Ive read is more likely to be interference rather than the ground loop.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBA1989 /forum/post/18309750


My biggest thing is understanding what I need. I've been doing a ton of research and I am still just flat out unsure.

Noise it typically less than 1 volt. Surge protector ignore everything until voltages exceed 330 volts (a number right on its box). Why would anyone recommend a surge protector for a noise problem? Technical ignorance.


Noise problems start with the single point ground between all system components. To eliminate ground loops. Even the AC electric safety ground is not relevant. We typically connect that single point signal ground to safety ground so as to also have human safety.


Solution to ground loops is about how currents are looping through signal lines and amplifiers. Step one in that solution is to find the noise 'current' path. Current means it has both an incoming and outgoing path through the amplifier. Once both incoming and outgoing paths are defined, then later is the solution that breaks either the incoming or outgoing path.


And that is what single point signal ground does. If every component's ground only meets at a common point, then both an incoming and outgoing current path would not exist.


The answer is simple. Implementing it is the art. Finding that incoming and outgoing path (ie a ground loop) sometimes can be difficult. You do not ground away noise with a receptacle's safety ground. You redirect or stop that noise current from going through an amplifier. Terms such as galvanic isolation are relevant. No surge protector does that.


Anyone recommending a surge protector for noise - now you know who not to listen to. See that number - 330 volts. That means it does nothing - remains inert - until voltages exceed that number. Noise is currents that typically create less than 1 volt.
 

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You also need to ensure that you do not create a ground loop and then get the resultant 60Hz hum.


You can create a ground loop if one component is plugged into one outlet and another component is plugged into another outlet. If there is any electrical connection between them (e.g. HDMI, component video, etc.), you can create a ground loop.


Past experience: CRT front projector into 1 outlet. Subwoofer into another. A nice hum.

Grounds were linked through the various video upscalers, converters, etc.



If you do not know what a ground loop is, let me google that for you.




...karl
 

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A few years ago we had a problem with a hard to trace hum going through some pro equiptment, we used a device made by ebtech and it worked perfect no hum whatsoever. You may want to try the more consumer based version for your probem if you cant find a solution to it, but still feel it could be some kind of loop you can check out the following hum eliminator they really do work HERE
 
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