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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
how much power is being saved when the amp dose not have to produce the low frequencies through bass management 50-Hz cross over point
 

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The Village Idiot
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And more than likely minuscule at best unless you tend to run low frequency test tones all the time.
 

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It's also going to depend on the relative efficiency of the amp in the subwoofer.


All other things being equal, you need to produce the same audio power in the room to get the same low frequency sound level whether the sound is coming from the main speakers or from the sub. (All other things are not actually equal, though. The placement of the speaker which is producing the low frequency sounds also makes a big difference in the sound level that you hear.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
interesting so the question of weather bass management is a advantage when running full range speakers. if it dos ant allow a amp to run more efficiently and allowing the speakers to be driven to a higher Laval without the amp clipping when running less efficient speakers say 4-6 ohm what would be the advantage

it seams that the main selling point for manufactures to bass management is greater headroom i interpret this to mean louder for more demanding programs

am i correct. even through the various audio press they all seem to want us to use the bass management even with full range speakers take a look at my gear should i cross the speakers over or run them full range to get the most out of the system. then to through in another wrench adding a higher power amp to the system


the equipment i am running

Integra DTR 40.1

Quad 22L2 these are 6 ohm

velodyne dd-10
 

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The Village Idiot
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Your original question wasn't clear to me - I see what you were asking now.

The higher crossover you use for your speakers the more power that is available to them for the higher frequencies. The lower the frequency range a speaker is asked to produce the more power is required to maintain the same SPL.


By shunting the low frequencies off to a sub - which generally have more powerful amps - the more power is available to reproduce the rest of the frequency range. The higher one crosses over the full range speakers the more power that is left in reserve - or what is commonly called headroom.


The best way to set things up is to let your ears be your guide.
 

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Many inexpensive receivers have limited power supplies and simply cannot drive "full range" average speakers to a loud volume in a large room. If you try, they'll "clip", causing distortion and possibly damaging the tweeters in the speakers.


A crossover which diverts the low frequencies to a subwoofer reduces the need for the receiver to provide the power needed to drive low frequencies, making more power available for the upper frequencies, thus reducing the likelihood of clipping.


Of course, most inexpensive speakers simply are not full-range and you need to specify a relatively high crossover frequency to divert the lower frequencies to the subwoofer in order get any kind of reasonable sound.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I find that price dose not always dictate quality.

my first speakers were Magnepan 1.6 at at $1600 not the most expensive but one of the finest in sound until they died,yet they were lucky if they could produce 50Hz

when i tried to cross those over at at 80Hz you could definately here a gap between the sub and speakers.

i replaced the Mages with the Quads again at $1600 a better blend with the Velodyne .

It is just hard to tell if crossing the system over lead much advantage,

so i guess the next question adding a more powerful amp to a receiver and how much power is really needed as to not tax the system in any meaningful way

the room which the system is in over 9700 cubic ft I think thats right 25x13x15x 2rooms
 
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