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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Forgive me if this is a newbie question. I tried searching, but searching for 'proscenium' brings up about every single thread.:D


My question is this:


Many of the theaters I see on here utilize a proscenium/stage. What is typically the reason for this? Are there acoustical reasons or is it simply aesthetics(SP?)?


I can quite obviously see the aesthetics angle...but I am not really seeing the acoustical. Maybe it is something else entirely?


Your help in diffusing this topic for me is greatly appreciated.
 

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I think the main benefit is for appearance. Many people like the look of a stage. It defines the front of the room.


If the stage is big enough people can use it for musical performances.


Stages/prosceniums are usually filled with sand to absorb any sound that travels down into them. Some people fill them with insulation. Often the left and right speakers and subwoofer are placed on the stage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
cool...reinforces what I thought...but I was trying to figure out if there were any "scientific" (ha ha) reasons for having one.


Thanks for th explaination...
 

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Scientific? How about monetary. I built mine (just last weekend) in order to keep my 6 month old away from the RPTV :)


Plus I think it looks cool, especially with the rope lights under the lip!
 

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dictionary.com - proscenium


\\Pro*sce"ni*um\\, n.; pl. Proscenia. [L., fr. Gr. ?; ? before + ? a tent, a wooden stage, the stage. See Scene.] 1. (Anc. Theater) The part where the actors performed; the stage.


2. (Modern Theater) The part of the stage in front of the curtain; sometimes, the curtain and its framework.



My 2 cents; is that it, at some point in time, became a glorified "shadow box" to prevent stray or unwanted / reflected light paths. Not to mention, it gives the average Joe a place to hide speakers, tons of sand, electronics, and millions of tried that already holes, etc.

If done properly an inexpensive mdf or 2x stick built frame can be covered with very attractive, read - black fabric...


Here's one of my favorite construction pages from Buddy_Yaussy
http://webpages.charter.net/buddy3/ht/images/ht031.jpg
http://webpages.charter.net/buddy3/ht/ht.html



Scott
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by fv_viking
Scientific? How about monetary. I built mine (just last weekend) in order to keep my 6 month old away from the RPTV :)


Plus I think it looks cool, especially with the rope lights under the lip!
HA! That's a good one. That 6-month old is going to be walking soon and not too long after that is going to be looking for places to jump down from. That's the reason my wife gave me for NOT building one. I explained it would keep the kids from using the speakers as targets for their ride-on's. She said "I'm not going to have something that begs to be used as a diving platform and have to police it all the time when you're not here". Not worth the battle. I'd rather save the energy for the component selection budget hearings I'm going to have with her.


Your post was quite witty and did give me a chuckle. :)


Cheers!


- Ed.
 

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You cannot attach a blank screen to a wall and call it a private cinema. The proscenium is the magical frame around the screen. It's a place to hide drapery pockets and speakers. The sad, uneventful dreariness of the multiplex is partly caused by a lack of a proscenium.
 

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There is an acoustic benefit if you place speakers on the proscenium and it is filled with sand. The sand absorbs some of the sound especially the low frequencies which are hard to absorb. The result is to minimize the chance of the stage and subfloor structure from becoming a resonating chamber. Also if there is a room below, the sand helps reduce the sound which leaks into the room below. Of course the rest of the floor will have less protection.


If you use lots of sand, and your home theater room is not in the basement and not on a slab then you should consult a structural engineer to be sure you aren't overloaded the joists and other structure in the house.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by settopguy


If you use lots of sand, and your home theater room is not in the basement and not on a slab then you should consult a structural engineer to be sure you aren't overloaded the joists and other structure in the house.
Jeez... Can you imagine?!!!


"Uh, hello? Is this State Farm? Yeah, I want to report damage to my house. How did it happen? Uh... a freak sand storm... yeah, that's it! No, not the whole house, just a couple of rooms."


D'OH!


- Ed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
It's a good thing I work out of my home office...because I would get walked out of the regular office building for laughing so loud...


Good point about the structural engineer ...hate to see that call to statefarm...;)
 

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As I recall reading in some earlier posts, the Proscenium with an overhead soffit, can help eliminate the need to treat some of the uppper first order reflections. It's a way of breaking up symmetrical rooms and "bad" room dimensions.


I'm building mine with a curved soffit that matches the stage. I plan on treating the soffit with theatershield...I think.


BTW, I should have 100% of drywall hung tomorrow, and will have pics. 65 sheets of drywall and counting....


I'll be ready to start on my stage and riser!


Patrick
 
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