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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Another tip: Try to watch no 4:3 material (i.e., zoom/stretch it) during the first couple of months that you have the set, or at least very little. The reason is that the phosphors do alot of aging right at the beginning, before their output levels off. It is important that they age evenly during this period. After a few months it's not quite as important.


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OK, I've been doing some more research before I take the plunge into a 16:9 RP set. Recently, I've been trying to understand the problem with "burn-in". Here's what I know so far:


- watching alot of 4:3 content on a 16:9 RP set can cause burn-in. Typically, this is reduced by using grey bars on the side as opposed to black bars.

- avoid watching channels that feature stationary objects on the screen - logos, tickers, etc.

- reduce the contrast of the set to 50% or less.


So, a few questions remain:

- can burn-in result from watching anamorphic DVDs? After all, there will be black bars on the top and bottom...so do you need grey bars to eliminate this possibility?

- Toshiba has a new feature on their new sets called Orbital Movement, that "imperceptibly" moves a widescreen image (with black bars on top and bottom) to reduce burn-in. Anyone know anything about this and how well it works?


Thanks,

Andrew
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by achalupka:
can burn-in result from watching anamorphic DVDs? After all, there will be black bars on the top and bottom...so do you need grey bars to eliminate this possibility?


Whether the DVD is Anamorphic or not has nothing to do with burn-in or the black bars you see. It's the Aspect Ratio of the film. A film with an aspect ratio of 2.35:1 will give you black bars on top and bottom of the screen. 1.85:1 will fill your screen. I think grey bars in lieu of black is suppose to reduce the amount of burn in but not eliminate it. Your best bet against burn in would be to vary your viewing habits.

 

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Quote:
Originally posted by BarryO:
Another tip: Try to watch no 4:3 material (i.e., zoom/stretch it) during the first couple of months that you have the set, or at least very little. The reason is that the phosphors do alot of aging right at the beginning, before their output levels off. It is important that they age evenly during this period. After a few months it's not quite as important.

What about widescreen DVDs (i.e. 1.85:1 and 2.35:1 material)? If I watch these exclusively, will this also cause burn-in? There's not much interesting HD content round these parts yet, so DVDs are the only real source of widescreen material.


Andrew

 

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Hi achalupka!


Well you pose a very interesting question, which I don't think anyone has yet precisely addressed although they did answer some portions of your questions. What I interpret you to be asking is . . . if you purchase a 16:9 set and watch primarily 2.35:1 content (which will definitely have black bars on the top and bottom), won't this create an eventual burn-in condition in those black bar sections?


I would have to say that eventually it probably would in theory. However, the best way to really avoid or seriously minimize burn-in in any aspect ratio set with any formatted material is to simply turn down the contrast! A ridiculously high contrast level is the true boggy-man in burn-in. If those levels are high it doesn't matter what color bars you display on any set, the result will be burn-in.
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[This message has been edited by Dark Cobra (edited 08-21-2001).]
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by eujin:
If you watch DVDs exclusively, why not just buy a 16:9 set?
That's what I'm talking about - on a 16:9 set, there will be black bars on the top and bottom of the image while watching widescreen DVDs. Will this cause burn-in?

 

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yes, it will, to some extent. few/no DVD's out there come in exactly 16:9 aspect ratio. all will have black bars.


"burn in" is uneven wear of the phosphors. If you watch lots of DVD's with similar aspect ratios (such as 1.85:1 or 2.35:1), the phosphor on the top and bottom (where the black bars are) will wear differently then the phosphor in the middle (where changing, colorful pixels are displayed).


Basically, burn in will be a problem for anyone who doesn't buy a 4:3 set and watch 4:3 material exlusively.


How do you minimize burn-in? Follow the advice given above:


* Turn down your contrast

* Try to watch sources with varying aspect ratios, especially full screen sources which will have no bars, especially in the first months of ownership


If you follow these two pieces of advice, especially the first one, you should find on a well-made set that you'll never notice any burn-in effects.


dinesh



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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
For 1.85 DVDs, there won't be any black bars. 1.85 is so close to 1.78, that the overscan of the set will make the black bars not visible.


It's imprtant to keep the contrast turned down. Which basically means you should have good light control (I have mine in a basement room). IMHO, an RPTV in a room will a wall full of windows is asking for trouble.


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You have a right to install OTA and dish antennas on property under your control.


See http://www.fcc.gov/csb/facts/otard.html
 
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