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Discussion Starter #1
how much on avg is a component prewire from plasma loc to under the tv or to the corner?


also is 50-60 per drop on cat5 and rg6 normal?


when they say drops do they refer to component as a drop? 5 drops?


any help is great, i am meeting with them soon.
 

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No clue. All I know is that running my own cable cost me $0.
 

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I'll see if I can find out for you from the one of the commercial installers I know. I believe it's $75 for CAT runs plus material. But that's in a commercial environment. A drop is a run, usually you can save by pulling multiple wires at the same time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
see i can have a buddy prewire with rg6, but thats it.


installer would do home network/ph wiring, and all hd locations and speaker locations...
 

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I won't get into the pricing issue; but, I would suggest you run CAT6 rather than Cat5e. You'll wish you did later; but, be very careful they run the CAT6 properly.
 

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Because it's new construction, is doing it yourself an option?


CATx and Coax are very easy to run yourself with the proper tools. All told, you may spend
 

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Do it yourself if you can and do conduit as well if you can. At least to areas where it wouldn't be easy to pull to later on if need be.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Erskine /forum/post/14308671


I won't get into the pricing issue; but, I would suggest you run CAT6 rather than Cat5e. You'll wish you did later; but, be very careful they run the CAT6 properly.

Being that I am getting ready to run Cat6, what is the proper way to run it?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by whumpf /forum/post/14310327


Being that I am getting ready to run Cat6, what is the proper way to run it?

Do you mean terminate it? I'm not sure I understand the question.


Actually all of this stuff is pretty easy to run yourself, especially if the walls are open. Even the larger-end connections like VGA or HDMI have 5-BNC breakouts, so you don't have to try to pull that huge connector though anything.


Like everybody else has said, take the amount of conduit you think you need, then double that. You'll be happy you did. Whatever you don't use you can terminate with a box and a blank plate...neat as you please.


Frank
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weasel9992 /forum/post/14310577


Do you mean terminate it? I'm not sure I understand the question.

A few posts back, Dennis said to be very careful that Cat6 is run properly, so I was just wondering if Cat6 needed any special handling. I've run plenty of coax, Cat5 and other cables, but never Cat6.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Erskine /forum/post/14308671


I won't get into the pricing issue; but, I would suggest you run CAT6 rather than Cat5e. You'll wish you did later; but, be very careful they run the CAT6 properly.

If you can afford it run cat6 for future proofing. If not then cat5e will be just fine.
 

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Some builders will let you do your own, but most will not as the GC will still be responsible...


The last person I helped out, I had them run conduit everywhere at a cost of 50$ per run instead of 75$ for just coax which baffled me, but a cost savings none the less.


I would have them run conduit and home-run it all to one location then you can run the cables later when you are ready and will have a nice tidy cable closet or junction point.


Since it is a new house, you will kick yourself later if you do not put conduit in
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by whumpf /forum/post/14310929


A few posts back, Dennis said to be very careful that Cat6 is run properly, so I was just wondering if Cat6 needed any special handling. I've run plenty of coax, Cat5 and other cables, but never Cat6.

I'm also puzzled. I've run plenty of Cat5...is there something else done with Cat6?


Frank
 

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------------------------------------------

Taken from: http://www.cat-5-cable-company.com/f...6-v-cat5e.html


[Q] What is the difference between CAT 6 and CAT 5e cable?


[A] Currently there is a great deal of confusion among Ethernet cable buyers concerning whether to purchase Cat5e, or to use Cat6. Most of this confusion comes from a misunderstanding by the buyer that buying Cat6 cable will give them an "all gigabit" network. This is not the case. Unless every single component in the network is gigabit rated, then you will never have a gigabit network, because your network will always run at the speed of your slowest device. Cat5e cable of good quality can run near or at gigabit speeds, it just cannot be "certified" for this use. By comparison, Cat6 is designed especially for gigabit use, and is certified to operate at said speed. It becomes a matter of whether or not you want to pay all that extra money, for little or no noticeable improvement in the performance of you network. In most cases, it makes more sense to go with Cat5e. It is for this reason that most of your new installations in the private sector are going with Cat5e. It is more economical, performs well, and is readily available in many colors. Many IT professionals when asked about why they specified Cat6 for a specific job, often responded stated that they "wanted the best they could get." This is the line of thought behind many purchases of cable. The average consumer often times is not aware that there is no real benefit to them to use Cat6, so they let someone talk them in to buying it. CAT 5 Cable Company is committed to helping people make good decisions about cable purchases and we are always standing by to help you.


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I might have missed it in the earlier threads, but where are yo9u located? There may be an AVSer near who is willing to help.


-Forseti
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Forseti /forum/post/14320683


------------------------------------------

Taken from: http://www.cat-5-cable-company.com/f...6-v-cat5e.html


[Q] What is the difference between CAT 6 and CAT 5e cable?


[A] Currently there is a great deal of confusion among Ethernet cable buyers concerning whether to purchase Cat5e, or to use Cat6. Most of this confusion comes from a misunderstanding by the buyer that buying Cat6 cable will give them an "all gigabit" network. This is not the case. Unless every single component in the network is gigabit rated, then you will never have a gigabit network, because your network will always run at the speed of your slowest device. Cat5e cable of good quality can run near or at gigabit speeds, it just cannot be "certified" for this use. By comparison, Cat6 is designed especially for gigabit use, and is certified to operate at said speed. It becomes a matter of whether or not you want to pay all that extra money, for little or no noticeable improvement in the performance of you network. In most cases, it makes more sense to go with Cat5e. It is for this reason that most of your new installations in the private sector are going with Cat5e. It is more economical, performs well, and is readily available in many colors. Many IT professionals when asked about why they specified Cat6 for a specific job, often responded stated that they "wanted the best they could get." This is the line of thought behind many purchases of cable. The average consumer often times is not aware that there is no real benefit to them to use Cat6, so they let someone talk them in to buying it. CAT 5 Cable Company is committed to helping people make good decisions about cable purchases and we are always standing by to help you.

Great education. Thanks man.


Frank
 

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I am certainly not an expert in this subject, but if I am going to be burying cables in walls and don't want to to hassle with them for the longest possible time, I am going to choose the most current standard, and right now that seems to be Cat6. A few extra dollars in cable could save many dollars in installation charges - or time if DIY.
 

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The "cat5" cable people are speaking the truth ... for ethernet IT networks. What they say, however, doesn't apply to audio & video (HDMI) over category rated wires. When it comes to transmitting high levels of bandwidth, CAT-6 is far superior to CAT-5 and when HDMI is the subject, high bandwidth is the basic requirement.


Cat6 wiring correctly means: you don't apply a pulling tension of greater than 25 lbs (no yanking on the wires); do not staple or dent the cable nor over tighten with wire ties; do not run it parallel to power cables; do not untwist pairs more than 1/4" when terminating into RJ45 connectors; do not knot or kink the cable; do not use couplers or splice the cable (HDMI is extremely sensitve to very small variations in impedance); make certhan the two wires in each pair are terminated to exactly the same length; do not use shielded cat6, no bend radii less than 1.25", use CAT6 RJ45 push through connectors; use strain relieve at the connector.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dennis Erskine /forum/post/14327216


The "cat5" cable people are speaking the truth ... for ethernet IT networks. What they say, however, doesn't apply to audio & video (HDMI) over category rated wires. When it comes to transmitting high levels of bandwidth, CAT-6 is far superior to CAT-5 and when HDMI is the subject, high bandwidth is the basic requirement.


Cat6 wiring correctly means: you don't apply a pulling tension of greater than 25 lbs (no yanking on the wires); do not staple or dent the cable nor over tighten with wire ties; do not run it parallel to power cables; do not untwist pairs more than 1/4" when terminating into RJ45 connectors; do not knot or kink the cable; do not use couplers or splice the cable (HDMI is extremely sensitve to very small variations in impedance); make certhan the two wires in each pair are terminated to exactly the same length; do not use shielded cat6, no bend radii less than 1.25", use CAT6 RJ45 push through connectors; use strain relieve at the connector.

Thanks Dennis!


Frank
 
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