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I recently purchased a CS-1 to replace a Iscan Pro with my Sanyo XP21 projector. The CS-1 probably produces a better picture than the Iscan when fed with DISH or DVD sources but it utterly destroys LD and S-VHS sources producing unstable, completely unwatchable pictures. (The LD and S-VHS sources produce hardly great, but certainly stable, watchable pictures when fed directly to the projector or through the Iscan.)


When I contacted Focus Enhancements about this problem, they said that the CS-1 can't be used with LD and S-VHS and I'd have to purchase or upgrade to a CS-2.


I find this an intolerable situation. Nowhere in the CS-1 literature does it state it can't be used with LD and S-VHS sources. I spent a lot of money on the CS-1 and now Focus Enhancements wants to extract a lot more money to do what much less expensive products can do easily.


This whole situation is very surprising since the Iscan and CS-1 use simililar de-interlacing technology. Did the Focus engineers just screw up or is this really a plan to extract more money from customers?
 

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THis is off the Focus Web Site regarding VCR's


:When I use a VHS VCR I don't get any video or when I use FF, REW, slow motion on the VCR the picture goes away, why?



A: Most standard VCRs have unstable timing (aka poor time base) which causes this problem. The remedy is to purchase a VCR with a Time Base Corrector built in, add an external Time Base Corrector or use the CenterStage 2 model which has a built in Time Base Corrector.


I have a CS-1 and the problem with VCRS not having time base problems is fairly well known. Prior to my CS-1 I had an ISCAN and it did not work with my S-VCR.
 

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While the VCR instability problem is quite well known, I have to say that I'm a bit surprised that a CS-1 won't handle a laserdisc source. The output from most LD players is very stable and should present no problem. While it may not be quite as good as the output of a decent DVD player, it's not remotely in the same ballpark as a VCR.


The only problems I've ever seen with LD sources and iScans centered around peak white level problems, as many LD players put out a video signal that's too 'hot' - i.e., the white voltage level is significantly above the standard. This caused compression and loss of detail in very bright areas of the picture. This was only a problem on the first 2 iScan products and should not be an issue with the iScan Pro or Ultra.


- Dale Adams
 

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I have just "upgraded" from the IScan Pro to the CS-2. I thought at first the S-Video cable TV feed was inferior to the IScan Pro 480P output. After I have had some time to adjust the CS-2 and the NEC Plasma I think the CS-2 does every bit as good a job as the IScan Pro (the IScan Pro is a great product IMHO).


I did find one possible problem I wanted to go to 1365x768 the native resolution of my plasma. I contacted the CS-2 support folks and received a quick response that I might have to go to DVI rather than VGA-RGB to get the 1365x768 resolution. The NEC information says that the input resolution is 1024x768 so I guess the internal scaler is still having to do some work.


I think my other surprise was that the interlaced inputs will accept only 480i and the progressive input is 480p only.


The 16:9, 4:3, 16:9LB, and 4:3LB is a great feature of the CS-2. I have started using it a lot with Comcast DCT 5100 HDTV.


TBC - I have not put to use yet.
 
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