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As i have been shopping around and learning what i need to learn to get what i want, i learnd about progressive scanning and line doubling. Mostly from here: http://www.cnet.com/electronics/0-32...9398-8-6226096


As it seemed to be explained to me there, Line doubling is when processors fill in one of the empty interlaced lines with info so that when it puts the frame on the screen it appears cleaner than just plain interlaced image.


Progressive scan is explained as when a processor draws the image one pixel at a time, left to right top to bottom until the frame is completely done and then puts it on the screen. Making for a seemingly vastly improved image.


What i dont get is how i keep seeing terms like: Progressive scan line doubling. How can a the processor do both..? Does it have to do with how the signal is received..? Is it impossible for some signals to be processed as completely progressive scan, and therefore they use some flashy improved version of Line Doubling..?


Also correct me if im wrong, but if as it says this is how puter monitors process their images, wouldnt this be a near requirement for anyone who plans to use theyre HDTV with theyre HTPC for mroe than just an MP3jukebox..? I cant see how you could do, say, PC gaming on an HDTV without this, if i undestand it correctly. These are the sorts of requirements of HDTV i think ive been waiting for. THat and my now contiuing discussion about DLP for RPTV


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Rama

"He who (BLEEPS) nuns, will later join the church "c> - Joe Strummer, The Clash
 

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Believe it can rapidly get very complex. For example, recall some early Toshiba TVs and Princeton monitors, well before ATSC HDTV, that were literally line doublers. That is, they simply swept each line twice, one below the other. Images looked a little 'smoother' than standard sets/monitors and you could view screens up close without noticing gaps between scan lines.


Therefore, with some, there's a preference for the term 'deinterlace'. For standard NTSC TV, the two 1/60 sec fields, normally presented in sequence and visually blended into 1/30-sec TV frames, are digitized into memory and the resulting frame displayed as a 1/60-sec progressive image. The numerous techniques or algorithms for manipulating and deinterlacing the fields fills textbooks. If you buy a Faroudja 5000 video processor, or have the right computer card and display, you can create progressive 1080-line HDTV by deinterlacing 1080i ATSC signals. -- John


[This message has been edited by John Mason (edited 08-13-2001).]
 
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