AVS Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

Hi,

 

     I hope I am posting this to the right forum. I would like to project images onto a storefront window, day and night. I have 4

 

windows and my budget is under $15,000. So far, we tried  an Optoma W306ST 3500 Lumen projector and some screen samples 

 

from prodisplay including sunscreens and high gain screens. I was surprised the high gain seemed to work better than the

 

sunscreen in the sun, even more surprisingly we tried just a regular can of spray on frosting and that seemed to work just as well. I

 

could see the image though the window in the day, but none of the results were as colorful or bright as I would like. My next step

 

might be to try this stuff Screen Goo. I don't exactly know what I am doing so I hope someone here can help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Yes, I want to project from the store onto the windows for advertising outside.  They are abut 5 feet high by 3' Wide. We want to

preserve as much natural light as possible inside the store and TVs don't have the look I'm going for. I don't even know if the technology is there, I only can find a few examples online, and they are mostly art projects. 
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,235 Posts
You are fighting physics on this. Rear projection requires that the projection space (the store) be as dark as possible, and still asks the external space to be as dark as possible for best results. Your situation basically shoots this in the foot and asks that physics be damned. Unfortunately, it just doesn't work that way.


Contrast is king in ANY projection setup. In a dark space, this is easy to achieve, but in a normally lit board room, where you are just competing with fluorescent lighting, about 80 advertised lumens per square foot of screen space are required to achieve about a 10:1 contrast ratio. That's not 100:1 or 1,000:1. - A TEN TO ONE contrast ratio.


In your setup, you may be competing against 30, 50, or a 100 (or more!) lumens per square foot so you will need to deliver ten times that level to the projection material to achieve a 10:1 minimum contrast ratio.


If I were you, I would take that 3,500 (rated) lumen projector, and move it closer and closer until you achieve the look you want.


This isn't going to happen by some screen magic, but I will say that you should check with Stewart Filmscreen for some of their better materials on this.


Yet, at the end of the day, what you want to do is not done with projection... ever. It is done with LED signage or on the cheaperish end, with daylight rated LCD flat panel displays. Keep in mind, when I say 'LED', I don't mean LED backlit LCD displays, I mean LED signage such as what is used in Times Square. It is one of the few truly 'bright' daylight viewable technologies.


If you were attempting to completely control light in the store, then I might be more on board with this, but years of seeing this question come up, and never hearing of any good results, leads me to a strong recommendation of taking a different course of action.


Projection requires dark - and everything you have been discussing fights it.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top