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I've lurked this forum for a long time, and used it as a great resource, but finally I was unable to use the search to find an answer.


I pulled down a ceiling fan and put in an outlet box, so that my IN72 now plugs into that box. That outlet box is now on a switch, that used to turn the Fan on/off. Is it bad for the projector to use that switch to cut the projector off?


I know some projector's run their fans after you power them down in order to continue cooling the bulb.


Appreciate any input, and thanks.
 

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If you turn off the switch before the cool down cycle or while it is on, it is not all that helpful nor all the damaging. You could buy one of those safety devices that screw over the switch to keep it in the on position. If no kids to be flippin switch on your, I would not be to worried about it. You can probably save about 12 watts of power consumption by turning off the switch. Others will argue the switch is a bad idea, but my projector gets unplugged and moved to a shelf after every use.. sometime I forget and power down the UPS before the fan stops.. no big deal, just turn it back on.. I have over 1600 hours on my lamp and no issues..
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by brodus /forum/post/20901639


I know some projector's run their fans after you power them down in order to continue cooling the bulb.

There are a number of reasons to run the fan until the projector cools down a bit, but bulb life per se is not one of them. Removing power before cool down is complete once in a while will have no significant effect on the life of projector components if you aren't moving it. Doing it consistently may shorten projector life a bit because of the thermal effects on components other than the bulb.


FWIW one of the reasons for the cool down cycle is so that the bulb cools down before you move the projector. The bulb is extremely fragile when hot, less so when it has cooled down some. Not an issue if you aren't moving the projector.
 

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Yeah, I'd cover the switch with one of the safety devices - more for accidental use while looking for the light switch... Also, you could just pull the switch out, tie the wires together (correctly) and replace the switch plate with a blank (so you can un-do this later).


Jeff
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor /forum/post/20902159


...replace the switch plate with a blank (so you can un-do this later).

Not just so that you can undo it in the future. Your local electrical code probably requires that the connection inside the box remain accessible. IOW you cannot just cover it up as part of the wall.
 

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The cool down fan removes the residual heat after the bulb is shut down. If you cut the fan that residual heat cooks the inside of your projector and it can get hotter than when it was running. Depending on the make and model of your projector this may be a bad idea. Play it safe, twist the wires together in the box and cover with a blank plate.


Carrying this one step further some guys install a dedicated projector UPS for the cool down cycle in case of power failure. I'm one.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/20902364


...that residual heat cooks the inside of your projector...

That's why it probably isn't a good idea to pull the plug during the cool down cycle on a regular basis.
Quote:
...some guys install a dedicated projector UPS for the cool down cycle in case of power failure.

Most of them think it is to protect the bulb, which doesn't need it, unless you are going to move the projector right away In any case, unless you have regular power failures, the impact on the other components shouldn't be an issue. It is a cumulative issue. I cannot count how many power failures due to utility problems or people kicking cords I have had, and never had a failure or noticeably reduced life of any component in a projector.


Note that the projector manufacturers, who tell you to let the cool down cycle complete in their manuals, do not tell you a UPS is needed to ensure that it happens even if there is a power failure.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Colm
That's why it probably isn't a good idea to pull the plug during the cool down cycle on a regular basis.


Most of them think it is to protect the bulb, which doesn't need it, unless you are going to move the projector right away In any case, unless you have regular power failures, the impact on the other components shouldn't be an issue. It is a cumulative issue. I cannot count how many power failures due to utility problems or people kicking cords I have had, and never had a failure or noticeably reduced life of any component in a projector.


Note that the projector manufacturers, who tell you to let the cool down cycle complete in their manuals, do not tell you a UPS is needed to ensure that it happens even if there is a power failure.
One real reason to have a ups is that once the power drops and comes back on, at lest with my projector, you have to wait for it to go through an extended cool down.. so you miss the movie or show for an extended time.. UPS keeps it on for the blip.. I even run my receiver and cable box with the UPS so no loss of picture or sound when the power drops for a couple of seconds...
 

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Yet more reasons for a UPS that has nothing to do with bulb life. Most projectors except some of the most recent have trouble restarting a hot bulb. And of course, if one simply must not miss a few minutes of programming, a UPS is a must, and not just for the projector. Some folks have one to keep their DVR running so they don't miss a second of their favorite programming.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by airscapes /forum/post/20903524


One real reason to have a ups is that once the power drops and comes back on, at lest with my projector, you have to wait for it to go through an extended cool down.. so you miss the movie or show for an extended time.. UPS keeps it on for the blip.. I even run my receiver and cable box with the UPS so no loss of picture or sound when the power drops for a couple of seconds...

I considered that, but in my darkened theater, running a movie, I felt I might not ever notice the power failure until the battery died. What's the point of having a UPS used that way, except for short term flickers?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jayn_j /forum/post/20907846


I considered that, but in my darkened theater, running a movie, I felt I might not ever notice the power failure until the battery died. What's the point of having a UPS used that way, except for short term flickers?

You will know the power is out, the UPS sounds an alarm. The 3 points are:

1. Short drops no interruption.

2. After a few minutes when you know it is off for good, you can power down just like you would with a computer on a UPS

3. If you buy a decent UPS it will also do power filtering and line voltage adjustment.


Or you can skip the UPS, they are not required..
 

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Currently I just have my Projector on a UPS. I'm thinking of getting one for my DirecTV DVR. It is a real pain to sit through a re-boot every time there is a momentary outage and I've had a least 6 this year while I was watching something.
 
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