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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi:


I had the misfortune of having my entire basement including my home theater wrecked twice in 2004. I am finishing up my new basement and home theater.

I am in a new home and it is located in an area with high hydrostatic pressure. Sump pump runs frequently.


I have lived in my home for 5 years and I have had no water intrusions and it wasn't a big deal as the basement was unfinished.


To prevent water damage I repalced my 5 years old sump sump. I added a battery backup sump pump. I also wanted to add a water sump pump.

I live in MN and folks have power outages that go a day or more.

No battery can last that long so water sump pump was supposed to be my backup.


However there was not enough space in the sump pump pit for the water based sump pump.


I already have an alarm in my sump pump where my security company will notify us if the water level starts rising.


Lack of water sump pump, sitting on wet land and brand new basement is making me nervous.


My plumber recommended getting a generator. He told me that generator will have to be located out of the home. I will have to do some wiring to make this possible but I am willing to do this. I am trying to figure out if I can automatically start the generator if power goes out. Since the power might not go out the generator might sit there for a while. Can the gas become stale and lead to generator failure?

If generator is the answer what type and how much power should it have?


Let me know if you have any other suggestions to prevent water damage in a basement.


Thanks
 

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I understand your concern, my basement flooded in the past as well, but from a water heater leak.


Generator - great idea. Find a good installer, someone who does a lot of them.


From what I've read, the generator is often run automatically, maybe once a week, to reduce the likelihood of failure. And yes, the generator, I think, is usually set to kick in automatically.
 

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I can't say much about your options, but I can appreciate your apprehension after the rainy summer we've had.


As for sitting gas, yes. By itself it will go stale and lead to hard starting. Two things you can do, first get non-oxygenated, premium gas (without any ethanol.) You can usually find it around some gas stations, but it may be hard to find. You'll know it because there will be a sticker stating that it is non-oxygenated and that it is illegal to use it in your car (only to be used for small engines, motorcycles, snow mobiles, etc.) If nothing else, I know you can get it from the Marathon gas station down in Lakeville, because that is where I get it for my lawn mower.


Second, add a fuel stabilizer (like Sta-Bil) to the gas. With a good fuel stabilizer you can let gas sit for a year and still maintain good start-ability (You can leave the gas in over the winter months so it is ready in case we have a freak early spring.) For extra protection though, I would inquire with the gas station as to when they switch over from the winter gas blend to the summer gas blend and then refill the generator with a fresh mix of gas+stabilizer after they do.


-Suntan
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sands_at_Pier147 /forum/post/20779763


Do you have a gas line at the new house? If you are putting in a permanent generator (to start automatically) you can consider using NG or LPG instead of gasoline.

VERY good idea.
 

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I'm looking for auto-shutoff valves with water sensors on the floor. So if something fails, the water sensors trigger and an electric gate valve shuts. Some are super expensive, and then there's SmartHome . I'd like to think I could depend on the SmartHome, but not sure
 

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Water table that's higher than the basement + regular power outages = an awfully compelling case for a permanent, hard-wired generator that will auto-start when the power fails. I'm no expert but I thought this particular species of generator was always powered by NG/LPG.


It must be hard to avoid upgrade-itis when you're looking at this kind of an installation. "Maybe we should make the generator a little bigger so we can run the refrigerator ... and the deep freeze ... and a lighting circuit or two ... and wouldn't it be cool to have the theater up and running so all the neighbors could hang out with us ..."
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwightp /forum/post/20780625


I'm no expert but I thought this particular species of generator was always powered by NG/LPG.

Those are certainly two popular choices. Diesel is also used for standby generators, even in residential applications. Trifuel (LP/NG/Gasoline) are not as popular for standby applications, but available. I don't know if there are any purely gasoline standby generators.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwightp /forum/post/20780625



It must be hard to avoid upgrade-itis when you're looking at this kind of an installation. "Maybe we should make the generator a little bigger so we can run the refrigerator ... and the deep freeze ... and a lighting circuit or two ... and wouldn't it be cool to have the theater up and running so all the neighbors could hang out with us ..."

Difference between 10KW and 20KW is ~1600, 900 between 10KW and 17KW. 2800 to 4400 on the top end...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Standby Generator does sound interesting to me. I am going to research them and get one installed. If anyone has used one and has brand recommendation please share.



Thanks
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hehateme /forum/post/0


Hi:


I had the misfortune of having my entire basement including my home theater wrecked twice in 2004. I am finishing up my new basement and home theater.

I am in a new home and it is located in an area with high hydrostatic pressure. Sump pump runs frequently.


I have lived in my home for 5 years and I have had no water intrusions and it wasn't a big deal as the basement was unfinished.


To prevent water damage I repalced my 5 years old sump sump. I added a battery backup sump pump. I also wanted to add a water sump pump.

I live in MN and folks have power outages that go a day or more.

No battery can last that long so water sump pump was supposed to be my backup.


However there was not enough space in the sump pump pit for the water based sump pump.


I already have an alarm in my sump pump where my security company will notify us if the water level starts rising.


Lack of water sump pump, sitting on wet land and brand new basement is making me nervous.


My plumber recommended getting a generator. He told me that generator will have to be located out of the home. I will have to do some wiring to make this possible but I am willing to do this. I am trying to figure out if I can automatically start the generator if power goes out. Since the power might not go out the generator might sit there for a while. Can the gas become stale and lead to generator failure?

If generator is the answer what type and how much power should it have?


Let me know if you have any other suggestions to prevent water damage in a basement.


Thanks

Have you seen this? I am considering one of these as I am in the same boat as you:

http://www.basepump.com/Basepump.htm


My next door neighbors sump pump (5 years old) failed a few weeks ago during that brutal rain storm in Maple Grove. Of course they were out of town.. They had about 4 inches of water in their finished basement.
 
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