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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to go w/ as large a screen as my room will allow. It's under construction (15' x 26' usable space). It will be a 100%, light controlled, dedicated theater room.


Being that I want to go w/ a 2.35:1 ratio, and don't want to spend the extra money on a lens, I was looking at the Panny, and use a 158" 1.0 gain screen.


My question, is will the Panny do good at this size (or as this entirely too large)? Will it be bright enough to look good, and will it support 3D at this size?


If not, is there another projector under $4k that would work?


I'm willing to pair something w/ the Lumagen Mini 3d if needed.


Thanks!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by readthis13  /t/1522805/pt-ae8000u-w-158-1-0-gain-2-35-1-ratio-a-good-idea#post_24489468


I want to go w/ as large a screen as my room will allow. It's under construction (15' x 26' usable space). It will be a 100%, light controlled, dedicated theater room.


Being that I want to go w/ a 2.35:1 ratio, and don't want to spend the extra money on a lens, I was looking at the Panny, and use a 158" 1.0 gain screen.


My question, is will the Panny do good at this size (or as this entirely too large)? Will it be bright enough to look good, and will it support 3D at this size?


If not, is there another projector under $4k that would work?


I'm willing to pair something w/ the Lumagen Mini 3d if needed.


Thanks!

You may want to try your question in the Official Owners' Thread, Panasonic PT-AE8000U (US version) PT-AT6000E (European version)
 

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You definitely will want to check with the owners to see how large they have gone.


By the numbers, you are way off of what should yield good results.


A 158" 2.35 screen is about a 168" diagonal 16:9 screen which puts about 8 lumens per square foot onto the screen. That's about half of what most people would go with for standard 2D projection. With the serious zoom range of that model, you can move the projector to the front end of the zoom range and muster out about 14 lumens. Go with a minimal gain screen of about 1.4 or so, and you get back about 20 lumens per square foot. That MAY be acceptable for 3D, and it will be good for 2D viewing.


The issue, IMO, is that the AE8000 is just not considered a very bright projector overall. It's good for home theater, but only for average sized screens and setups the need the flexibility of the lens. Working the front end of the zoom range and a minimal gain screen, then about 133" diagonal would be the largest size I would probably recommend if 3D were important. You could probably go to about a 180" diagonal if only 2D viewing were important.

http://www.projectorcentral.com/Panasonic-PT-AE8000-projection-calculator-pro.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by AV_Integrated  /t/1522805/pt-ae8000u-w-158-1-0-gain-2-35-1-ratio-a-good-idea#post_24493705


You definitely will want to check with the owners to see how large they have gone.


By the numbers, you are way off of what should yield good results.


A 158" 2.35 screen is about a 168" diagonal 16:9 screen which puts about 8 lumens per square foot onto the screen. That's about half of what most people would go with for standard 2D projection. With the serious zoom range of that model, you can move the projector to the front end of the zoom range and muster out about 14 lumens. Go with a minimal gain screen of about 1.4 or so, and you get back about 20 lumens per square foot. That MAY be acceptable for 3D, and it will be good for 2D viewing.


The issue, IMO, is that the AE8000 is just not considered a very bright projector overall. It's good for home theater, but only for average sized screens and setups the need the flexibility of the lens. Working the front end of the zoom range and a minimal gain screen, then about 133" diagonal would be the largest size I would probably recommend if 3D were important. You could probably go to about a 180" diagonal if only 2D viewing were important.

http://www.projectorcentral.com/Panasonic-PT-AE8000-projection-calculator-pro.htm

Thanks for the response. Do you think that 14 lumens / ft is too low? (for 2D)
 

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Movie theaters are often below 14 l/ft, but the recommendation really is between 13 and 21 lumens in a good space. The better the room, the less lumens which are really needed for good results.


The BenQ W7500 may be one that you want on your list to consider.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by readthis13  /t/1522805/pt-ae8000u-w-158-1-0-gain-2-35-1-ratio-a-good-idea#post_24489468


I want to go w/ as large a screen as my room will allow. It's under construction (15' x 26' usable space). It will be a 100%, light controlled, dedicated theater room.


Being that I want to go w/ a 2.35:1 ratio, and don't want to spend the extra money on a lens, I was looking at the Panny, and use a 158" 1.0 gain screen.


My question, is will the Panny do good at this size (or as this entirely too large)? Will it be bright enough to look good, and will it support 3D at this size?


If not, is there another projector under $4k that would work?


I'm willing to pair something w/ the Lumagen Mini 3d if needed.


Thanks!

I'm using my AE8000U on an inexpensive Elite 150" with 1.0 gain and it looks fantastic - 2D and 3D.

Regarding 2:35 and 3D - Most 3D movies are only 1:85. Some are a mix of 2:35 and 1:85 - like Tron legacy - and you can have the Panny do an auto adjust and make the screen auto-fill when it detects a 2:35 scene. Perhaps this is not what you're looking for and you're looking to buy a dedicated 2:35 screen? And view 3D is 2:35? IDK about that, but 2:35 on my screen looks ok. I use my HTPC as a normal computer most of the time, so I wouldn't want my view to be diminished to 2:35, however, I was in the same boat as you when I was setting up my home theater. I wasn't sure which screen size, gain, etc. to buy, but pulled the trigger on this screen. It's perfect for my needs. My room is nearly 20 feet across and over 24 feet long.



Here's an old pic of my theater room. It's not light controlled at all and the ceiling is white. I have no issues when watching a movie at night. Daytime leaves something to be desired, but technically, this theater room is a "loft" so unless I completely seal it, there is no way I can block out the light -however, the Panny is performing admirably.

 

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If you are wanting to fill a very large screen and have plenty of brightness, even as the bulb ages and dim, maybe you should look at getting an Epson 5010/20/30 with the "Light Power Edition" filter. It allows you to use the projector in the brightest "Dynamic" mode, with image quality equal to, or better than, the dimmer "Cinema" mode. The filter does dim the picture a bit compared to the unfiltered Dynamic output, but If I recall correctly, you still end up with 1600 lumens for your "best" picture mode. That compares to about 800 lumens in the standard "Cinema" mode.


The tricky part would be finding the filter, but they show up on here or on eBay every once in a while. I just bought one a few weeks ago, just in case I need it in the future. I played with it a little bit (of course), and it works as advertised.


For my 133" scope screen and with low hours on my 5010's bulb, I have plenty of brightness, and I don't think I will ever lack for brightness even when my bulb ages. But the filter may be useful when I'm watching sports with some lights on, or if I go to a larger screen in the future (as I am tempted to do).
 
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