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Would someone please explain the difference (other than price) between (1) an impact punchdown tool and (2) a manual punchdown tool? Is it worth spending the money on the impact punch down tool? Will it be easier for a newbie?


Thanks in advance.
 

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Personally I'm not a fan of the impact punch downs. All they do additionally is cut the wire as you push it down. You can't use them on electronic boards or anything fragile.


I instead use a manual punch down then waste a few more seconds using a small snipper to cut the wire.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete_P /forum/post/14263734


Personally I'm not a fan of the impact punch downs. All they do additionally is cut the wire as you push it down. You can't use them on electronic boards or anything fragile.


I instead use a manual punch down then waste a few more seconds using a small snipper to cut the wire.

Just make sure and use cutters that cut the wire flat against the body. A piece of wire hanging out could cause grief.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by egnlsn /forum/post/14264816


Just make sure and use cutters that cut the wire flat against the body. A piece of wire hanging out could cause grief.

Good point. The cutters I use get the wire cut flush so I have never encountered any problems with my method and would not have thought of that.
 

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Or buy a good quality adjustable impact tool, such as those made by Harris. Set the impact so its just enough for the job.


They even make one that comes with two blades - a 110 and a 66 blade, and each blade is double sided - one end with a side that cuts, and the other end which does not cut. The unused blade stores in a cutout on the rear end of the handle, and is locked into place, so it won't get lost.


I've used the Harris impact on many installations, even circuit-board mounted 110 terminations, and never have a problem. Perfect connection, and a nice clean cut all in one step.


As with any other tools, you get what you pay for. The aforementioned tool runs around $100 or so.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete_P /forum/post/14264912


Good point. The cutters I use get the wire cut flush so I have never encountered any problems with my method and would not have thought of that.

I used to do the same as you with Lucent jacks. I don't remember what it was about them that made me not want to use my punchdown tool, but that was some time ago. I once had a foreman throw a fit because I didn't punch them down, until he looked closely at the termination.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by botcher /forum/post/14265128


Or buy a good quality adjustable impact tool, such as those made by Harris. Set the impact so its just enough for the job.


They even make one that comes with two blades - a 110 and a 66 blade, and each blade is double sided - one end with a side that cuts, and the other end which does not cut. The unused blade stores in a cutout on the rear end of the handle, and is locked into place, so it won't get lost.


I've used the Harris impact on many installations, even circuit-board mounted 110 terminations, and never have a problem. Perfect connection, and a nice clean cut all in one step.


As with any other tools, you get what you pay for. The aforementioned tool runs around $100 or so.

The Harris is an excellent tool. Even has a little spudger in the side so you can pick out wires if needed. As long as the blade is sharp, you can keep it on the low impact setting and everything stays happy.
 

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Use an impact tool unless you want to worry about intermittent and non-terminated wires. If you do a lot of jacks and other devices with 110 blocks, there really is no other way to do the job well in my opinion. The wire needs to be cut off exactly at the IDC (to eliminate possible shorts) and pushed down into the IDC far enough so that the insulation of the wire is cut into from both sides and firmly touching the IDC.


IDC = Insulation Displacement Connector (the V-shaped metal connector inside a 110-style block)


Carl
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fedders /forum/post/14265310


The wire needs to be cut off exactly at the IDC (to eliminate possible shorts)...


IDC = Insulation Displacement Connector (the V-shaped metal connector inside a 110-style block)


Carl

And minimize (or eliminate) reflections.
 
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