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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, does anyone make any highly flexible high speed hdmi cables, like with a soft silicone rubber shield, or possibly a cloth material -- rather than stiff plastic. If yes, I'll need some manufacturers names and any other pertinent information about them, model number, if you know. I did a search but didnt see anything obvious. Found a few cloth ones online, but wasnt sure how flexible they would be, being online with limited photos and description Thank you.
 

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I use Redmere high speed cables. They are active cables so the wire gauge is smaller than most so they are very flexible and don't put any stress on the HDMI inputs. However, like any cable, you have to be careful how far you "bend" them. What exactly are you trying to do?
 

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For 6' and shorter lengths, I strongly recommend the Parts Express Super Slim HDMI cables. They are inexpensive and work great.


http://www.parts-express.com/super-slim-high-speed-hdmi-cable-with-ethernet-6-ft-supports-3d-and-audio-return-(latest---180-688


Their price is significantly better than Redmere cables and they don't use active components which is a plus. About 1mm or so thicker than the Redmere cables, but a lightweight and very flexible cable.
 

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How long of a cable are you looking for ? cable thickness would effect flexibility...



 



Otto Pylot  is right Redmere cables will have smaller wire gauge, but may be expensive if you are looking for a 25ft + cable



 



why do you need, highly flexible cable.. how are you installing it ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ali 9to5Cables  /t/1520841/q-flexible-hs-hdmi-cables#post_24447100


How long of a cable are you looking for ? cable thickness would effect flexibility...



 



Otto Pylot  is right Redmere cables will have smaller wire gauge, but may be expensive if you are looking for a 25ft + cable



 



why do you need, highly flexible cable.. how are you installing it ?


I wanted to use some shorter flexible soft as possible cables where I am stacking my equipment: Receiver, Bluray, Line Conditioner, Cable Box. My best guess is to get one 12" then another 18" then 2 ft, and lastly to maybe 3 ft. I would then run one 12 ft, high speed HDMI [ARC] cable out to the tv. I'm putting the Receiver on the top for ventilation reasons. I estimate my stack equipment height to be approx 18" ( I included spacing between each piece ). I'm not putting these in a cabinet but looking to place them on an external small thin rack of sorts, again for ventilation reasons. An 18 x 18 x 18, rack should suffice. That is about as graphic as I can visualize it.


Thank you for yor time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Otto Pylot  /t/1520841/q-flexible-hs-hdmi-cables#post_24435580


I use Redmere high speed cables. They are active cables so the wire gauge is smaller than most so they are very flexible and don't put any stress on the HDMI inputs. However, like any cable, you have to be careful how far you "bend" them. What exactly a re you trying to do?[/quote


Nothing specai, I just like softer flexible cable if it is available. Dislike the sitff ones especially when I am working with short distances
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by diyer999  /t/1520841/q-flexible-hs-hdmi-cables#post_24474487


I wanted to use some shorter flexible soft as possible cables where I am stacking my equipment: Receiver, Bluray, Line Conditioner, Cable Box. My best guess is to get one 12" then another 18" then 2 ft, and lastly to maybe 3 ft. I would then run one 12 ft, high speed HDMI [ARC] cable out to the tv. I'm putting the Receiver on the top for ventilation reasons. I estimate my stack equipment height to be approx 18" ( I included spacing between each piece ). I'm not putting these in a cabinet but looking to place them on an external small thin rack of sorts, again for ventilation reasons. An 18 x 18 x 18, rack should suffice. That is about as graphic as I can visualize it.
The Parts Express ones I linked above are excellent for this type of work. Unfortunately, they don't have the super short ones, but they have 18" and 3' which are excellent for in-rack jumpers. They are about the thickness of a typical iPhone charging cable if you have one of those around. Maybe a bit thicker, but certainly very slim and I have tested about 40 of them to be fully compliant with 1080p/60 content using testing equipment without any failures... So, for around $5 a cable, it's a phenomenal solution. For your 12' run, pick up a Redmere cable from Monoprice and call it a day. You must be able to replace any installed Redmere cables, so don't put it behind drywall unless you can pull it out easily and replace it. Some people have damaged the electronics built into Redmere cables and then the cable does not work at all.


So, some of these:
1-Foot HDMI Cable
3-Foot HDMI Cable

and one of these:
15 Foot Redmere Cable
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by AV_Integrated  /t/1520841/q-flexible-hs-hdmi-cables#post_24483154


" . . . For your 12' run, pick up a Redmere cable from Monoprice and call it a day . . . . "


At first I thought the recommendation for Redmere was just a brand choice. Of course, now I see it is a type of cable with components inside. What is the benefit of this type of cable since you recommended a 15ft Redmere? (I'm not running anything thru drywall).



Btw, are the cloth covered HDMI cables any more flexible than the thin plastic ones you recommended, the Parts Express Super Slims ? The closest thing I could find for cloth were two brands named Twisted Veins and Aurum. But even though they looked flexible and soft, I figured that could just be the product photos.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by diyer999  /t/1520841/q-flexible-hs-hdmi-cables#post_24486916


At first I thought the recommendation for Redmere was just a brand choice. Of course, now I see it is a type of cable with components inside. What is the benefit of this type of cable since you recommended a 15ft Redmere? (I'm not running anything thru drywall).



Btw, are the cloth covered HDMI cables any more flexible than the thin plastic ones you recommended, the Parts Express Super Slims ? The closest thing I could find for cloth were two brands named Twisted Veins and Aurum. But even though they looked flexible and soft, I figured that could just be the product photos.
Redmere cables allow for thinner wiring to be used inside the cable jacket. There is no HDMI cable that I have seen which is worth owning that has a cloth jacket. The rubber (not plastic) jacket on cables allows for very good flexibility, but you must observe a reasonable bend radius when using all HDMI cables.


So, with the 15' Redmere cable I linked to you get a cable about the width of your average iPhone charging cable which can handle 1080p and UHD resolutions. It's plenty flexible for most installations and gives you the distance you need from the A/V receiver to the display. There are 10' versions as well if that's all the distance you need.


The active adapters of Redmere re-balance the signal so you get a nice solid image and the thin cable at that distance which is just not possible with standard HDMI cables.


But, at 6' or less, you can get some non-Redmere cables which are not only a lot less money, but are about the same width and flexibility. I don't have any Redmere cables in my setup, but I have used them. I do have the Parts Express ones in my setup, and they have performed flawlessly for me. Considering the price, I would just pick a few up and try them out. The reviews on both sites support the quality.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by diyer999  /t/1520841/q-flexible-hs-hdmi-cables/0_20#post_24486916


At first I thought the recommendation for Redmere was just a brand choice. Of course, now I see it is a type of cable with components inside. What is the benefit of this type of cable since you recommended a 15ft Redmere? (I'm not running anything thru drywall).



Btw, are the cloth covered HDMI cables any more flexible than the thin plastic ones you recommended, the Parts Express Super Slims ? The closest thing I could find for cloth were two brands named Twisted Veins and Aurum. But even though they looked flexible and soft, I figured that could just be the product photos.

Redmere cables are active cables in that they draw a little power from the sink end (tv). That allows them to use smaller gauge wire which means thinner cables, hence the flexibility, while maintaining the HDMI high speed spec. Certified , passive, high speed HDMI cables are certified for up to 25'. But Redmere cables, because they are active cables, can have much longer lengths and still maintain the specs. The downside is that because they have a chipset in the sink end, they can fail over time like any electronic component. I would never put them in-wall unless you had a nice, wide conduit.


Bottom line is that Redmere are very flexible cables that put absolutely no strain on the inputs and can be run longer than 25' with no loss of HDMI specs. The downside is that they have a chipset that can fail like any other electronic device. I use 10' and 6' Redmere cables as my "last mile" to my components and they have worked flawlessly.
 

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Would the Parts Express ultra-slims work in an application where I go:

Receiver -> 3' -> Keystone Jack -> 3' -> Keystone Jack -> 1' -> TV?

The total distance would be 7' and across 2 keystone jacks.

If not, what would you recommend?
 

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Would the Parts Express ultra-slims work in an application where I go:

Receiver -> 3' -> Keystone Jack -> 3' -> Keystone Jack -> 1' -> TV?

The total distance would be 7' and across 2 keystone jacks.

If not, what would you recommend?
In my experience, yes. I've done very similar in some of my setups.

Monoprice now also has ultra-thin HDMI cables in one-foot increments up to 6' long, so if you really need 1.5', 4', and 1' you can get them there for similar reasonable Monoprice pricing.

http://www.monoprice.com/Category?c_id=102&cp_id=10240&cs_id=1024014
 

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Just considering flexibility other than signal Interference

I thought if you were considering to reduce signal interference,so you'd like to have all HDMI cables as flesible as they can.If you chose HDMI cable with ferrite cores,that would be fine.I found it here site:amazon.com/dp/B00V63JYAW:)
 

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Ferrite cores only help in certain cases, most of the time they are unnecessary. Thin cables are fine if you pay attention to distance. Larger gauge cables will work fine for longer distances but you will lose the flexibility, which is uch more important because of the stress on the inputs than interference. Redmere cables are the mid-point in that they are active cables so the cable can be very thin. The downside is because they are active (drawing a little power from the sink end with a chipset built-in to the cable connector end) they can fail over time like any other electronic device. Interference is usually not an issue.
 
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