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Just remember, with several inches of snow on your roof, the quality of your digital reception will go down. Just another hint to get your antenna outdoors and some 25-35 feet above ground level. There is no substitute for a good directional antenna mounted outdoors if you want top reception and no 'dropouts' or 'blocking' on your display. I would say this, generally, holds true for a distance of anything over 25 miles from antenna location to the transmitters. Of course, I am the first to admit, every reception situation is different.
 

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Around here we know from experience that snow buildup on rooftops can affect indoor TV reception, especially the thick, wet kind (moreso when frozen).


These wet layers reflect and attenuate UHF TV signals in unpredictable ways. (Due to their longer wavelengths, VHF TV signals seem less affected, except by very thick drifts or layers.)


This time every year we get complaints from some OTA viewers of our 5,000 KW analog UHF station, most of whom use indoor antennae (or none at all).


After big snowstorms we get calls like "your reception was fine and then got bad and all the other stations are still fine."


(In conversations with engineers at the other local stations, they say they hear the same thing, only it's their station that's bad with all the others still fine. :rolleyes: )


So yes, you can expect snow to affect indoor antennas for OTA TV reception.
 

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Snow definitely affects UHF.


Around here channel 57 is weak, and I normally get a -12 DBmv signal at my tuner. During a heavy snow storm the signal can drop to -25 DBmv easily and I lose all reception, and this is with an outdoor antenna. Then during other storms the signal is unaffected, so the size of the flakes or something affects it too. I can never predict which storms will wipe it out.


With my indoor attic antenna, I regularly lose around 3 to 6 DB of UHF signal from snow on the roof, and as mentioned above it is worse when heavy and wet.


But my biggest problem with snow is the stuff on the ground. It affects the ground reflections and causes all of my rotor stored settings to become useless, and I have to hunt for the best direction for each station. Once I get the aim, some stations come in better than normal, and others come in worse. And this problem lasts till the snow melts.
 
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