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Could someone explain to me what "back lighting" is, and why it is important. I've read some stuff on it, but it doesn't entirely make sense to me. Just to take an example, I don't quite understand what is meant by things like 6500k lights. Is that 6500 degrees kelvin? Wouldn't that cause my apartment to instantaneously burst into flames?


I'm interested in purchasing a GWII, and someone said that "back lighting" helps with black level issues, so I wanted to find out what it all means. Any explanation would be much appreciated.


Thanks.
 

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Oh come on. Somebody has to know the answer to this question. Could someone please just take the five minutes it would take to post a response?
 

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6500K Yes it does mean Kelvin the higher the K the more blue is in the color of the bulb!


No it woun't hurt anything just make sure the light has a UV filter glass on the Pendant (Housing of the Bulb). Reason being is that it can hurt your eyes etc.


All it does is adds fill into the spectrum to the viewing of your black levels with the GWXBR.


Hope this helps a bit
 

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It does not make sense to me that the quality of the back light would matter. This light (I think) is used to keep a background light source that is constant to relieve the eyes from fatigue caused by the constant adjustment to light level changes. I can not watch direct view television with all room lighting off as it kills my eyes and I think the backlight is a fancy way to overcome this - gives no screen reflections. I just don't see how the light output range would make any difference as you are watching the output of the television.

Pete in Louisiana
 

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The reason for the 6500k is the need for a balanced light. You wouldn't want an orange or green or blue light around the TV as it would tend to alter the perception of color on the set. The same goes for the color of the wall which the light is shining on. I have mine painted a neutral gray (grey for you canucks :) ) and I am pleased with it.


I paid $15 for my light at Menards. An under cabinet light for 7 and a 6500k bulb for 8. It's a cheap way to see if you like it.


Some use the Optilight which is available from Office Depot for $50.


I don't think it's just for LCD sets either.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by gpflepsen
The reason for the 6500k is the need for a balanced light. You wouldn't want an orange or green or blue light around the TV as it would tend to alter the perception of color on the set. The same goes for the color of the wall which the light is shining on. I have mine painted a neutral gray (grey for you canucks :) ) and I am pleased with it.


I paid $15 for my light at Menards. An under cabinet light for 7 and a 6500k bulb for 8. It's a cheap way to see if you like it.


Some use the Optilight which is available from Office Depot for $50.


I don't think it's just for LCD sets either.
The Ott-lite which costs a pretty penny ($50 at Office Depot) -- non-standard socket, too -- is 5900K color temperature with a 91 CRI or 93 CRI.


Westinghouse has newly-released a 6500K 98 CRI fluorescent in 18", 24" and 48". It's called Real-Lite or something like that -- and Angelo (Angelo Brothers?) is the distributor for Westinghouse light bulbs -- call them for a local dealer.


6500K is the light temperature. It is what all TV broadcasts are standardized to, and movies, too, I believe. It's the color temperature when you're outside on a bright, clear sunny day from 10 am to 2 pm.


CRI refers to how accurately a light bulb renders the colors of the object it illuminates. 98 CRI means that the colors the bulb is lighting (wall, floor, ceiling, etc.) are 98% accurate in terms of how the light causes you to see these colors. Most "full spectrum" bulbs are 5000K with 90-93 CRI. Thus, the Westinghouse bulb is a great improvement over these -- and also quite a bit cheaper than the $60+ (I believe) Ideal-lume bulbs which have the same color temperature (K) and CRI.


The perfect setup for a home theater would be to have your TV calibrated or adjusted so it tracks the grayscale perfectly at 6500 K. Then, backlight or sidelight or otherwise softly illuminate your viewing room (if you want or need incidental lighting) with a 6500K fluorescent bulb with close to 100 CRI, making sure that the walls or floors or ceilings the light is reflecting/shining on are colorless white or colorless black so that the roomlight "glow" does not (dis)color or "taint" the light coming from your 6500K bulb(s).
 
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