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I just have a quick question. I hope this is not off topic. But technically speaking can anyone explain what the difference is between movies broadcast on tv when compared to movies straight from a dvd.


I have a video processor and certain modes dont work well with dvd, yet they work fine with standard definition movies, or hd movies.


I am just wondering technically when it comes to deinterlacing/frame rate ect.. is their any difference between dvd vs a movie broadcast on tv. Im not talking made for tv movies, im speaking of theater released movies broadcast on tv.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murilo /forum/post/19506512


I just have a quick question. I hope this is not off topic. But technically speaking can anyone explain what the difference is between movies broadcast on tv when compared to movies straight from a dvd.


I have a video processor and certain modes dont work well with dvd, yet they work fine with standard definition movies, or hd movies.


I am just wondering technically when it comes to deinterlacing/frame rate ect.. is their any difference between dvd vs a movie broadcast on tv. Im not talking made for tv movies, im speaking of theater released movies broadcast on tv.

Well for starters a Blu-Ray is a true 1920x1080 progressive often MPEG4 or AVC encoded transfer. Nothing on TV is a true 1080p and MPEG4 transmission is still spotty. It depends on what modes you have and what they are doing exactly to the picture.


Theatrical features released on TV (apart from rarely being shown native aspect ratio if they are shot 2.35) are also going to be presented at 29.97 or at 59.94 frames per second with pulldown added. Blu-rays are natively 23.978 -- no one broadcasts 23.978. As as a result TV deliverables and home video deliverables are typically not struck from the same master. To be more accurate these days deliverables are struck for their respective purposes during the Digital Intermediate phase and necessary adjustments (like adding pulldown, frame repositioning, opening the matte for networks like HBO that don't like 2.35, and changing the colorspace from CineLog to either REC601 for SD or REC 709 for HD.) Also the different networks request deliverables on an innumerable number of different formats. Some are sent as files, some are DVCPROHD, some are D5, some are HDCAMSR, etc and each of these has its own inherrent way of managing and processing the image (color space and compression schemes are all over the map).
 

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Originally Posted by ABCTV99 /forum/post/19506592


Well for starters a Blu-Ray is a true 1920x1080 progressive often MPEG4 or AVC encoded transfer. Nothing on TV is a true 1080p and MPEG4 transmission is still spotty.

Some cable channels like HBO send movies 24 fps progressive with MPEG-2 telecine flags. Unfortunately no cable box I know of knows how to display the progressive frames, however most HDTV's sold these days will recognize telecined film content and will reconstruct the interlaced frames so you're effectively seeing progressive frames.
 
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