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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I thought I was set on getting a DLP projector. Then I thought about a 60 inch LED. Then I realized I shouldn't spend as much as either of those would cost, so I thought I'd look at a 47 inch or 50 inch 3D LED/Plasma set....And then I came across a boat load of Mitsubishi DLP tvs. I will admit my total arrogance - I thought for the longest time they were using older technology at the start of 1080p imaging and as such didn't look all that great compared to tvs of today. Then I realized that's silly. Movie theaters use DLP projectors. So my question: Would a 2010 model, such as the WD-65638 look good by todays standards? Is there much improvement between a 2010 set and a 2012 set? I know my 3 or 4 year old LED looks just as good as the ones today in the same price range so I imagine it's the same with DLPs. I'm almost certain I would like the DLP image as I'm always trying to get my LED to look as close to theater like as possible and prefer plasmas for that very reason.


So I guess for those that found this rather long winded: Am I right in assuming DLP tvs deliver great image, just as good as any other 1080p set, just a different*kind* of image? And should I love the theater look, I will quite enjoy the image displayed on a rear projection tv?
 

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Well, if you like the theatre look you will LOVE a DLP set, or really any rear projection in general. I love my SXRD, I have a real hard time watching anything else now. It's the most theatrical look you can get a consumer device. If I was you I'd go look at some DLP sets, and see what you think. I think you will like what you see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Audiophyle  /t/1468068/question-about-rptvs#post_23201340


Well, if you like the theatre look you will LOVE a DLP set, or really any rear projection in general. I love my SXRD, I have a real hard time watching anything else now. It's the most theatrical look you can get a consumer device. If I was you I'd go look at some DLP sets, and see what you think. I think you will like what you see.

Yeah I'm really close to pulling the trigger on one. It seems most of the ones for sale are 2010 models which...I'm sure still look really awesome. And it's the closest thing I can get to total immersion without a projector. I guess I have to get the idea out of my head that $$ spent= quality since I can pick up a 60, 65 or even 73 inch 3D ready DLP for 500 bucks.
 

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That's funny you say that because I really had to go through the same thing. It's easy to look at a bigger, slightly older RP TV and think to yourself, it's big, its cheap, its bulky, clearly it's inferior. But really, what they are is about the best way to watch movies if you can't fit a projector into your life at the moment. It's having the projector and the screen built together in one housing. It's just that people value thin and light now, and yes when I look at my 60" 60XBR1 it is quite large, but it doesn't even weight a hundred pounds. Its easy as hell to move around with two people, changing bulbs is easy, and it still has the best PQ of any TV I've personally been able to sample, except for maybe the Qualia 006 I almost bought. It's a thing of beauty. You just don't get the same immersion that you want with an LCD. If you're not scared of the OB problems that Sonys had, you can always look for those too. Dirt cheap now, and many of them have been repaired so they are good for years. And replacing the OB from what I hear isn't too hard, and isn't prohibitively expensive. And they have what might be considered as the best picture almost ever for a consumer display device.
 

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Main things to think about when thinking about a DLP RPTV is the higher maintenance cost vs. LCD and Plasma. You'll certainly have the cost of replacement lamps every couple of years and those go for about $70. You'll most-likely have to replace the DMD ( mirror chip ) after about 8000 to 10000 hours. That requires at least some skill swapping out a CPU in a computer and a relatively dust-free environment. The DMD runs about $160. The alternative is to buy an LCD or Plasma. Something goes wrong with these sets and it is most-likely going to be tossed in the trash. Parts can be replaced in LCD and Plasma but that generally costs a lot more than $200.


The only real PQ drawback as far as DLP goes is that the image is enlarged using mirrors and is projected through what is basically a plastic window. I have a semi-gloss plastic shield and that produces some " shimmering " in areas of high-contrast, like white backgrounds. The highly-reflective screens are much better but then you have the problem of reflections from lighting that is behind the seating area. Most Plasma and LCD will have glossy screens and reflection is going to be a problem.


LCD and Plasma images will dim over time and will generally lose half of their light output after 20,000 or 30,000 hours, which is a long, long time. The electronics will die long before the panel dims. Lamp-driven DLP will start to dim after about 2000 to 3000 hours and flickering will be a warning before the lamp dies completely. Replacing the lamp will result in an image that is as good as it was when the set was brand new. I check calibration with a DVE HD Blu-ray or the AVS ITU-R BT.709 calibration disc and red, blue, green filters once every 6 months and do a thorough calibration with EyeOne and CalMan when I change lamps.


The best PQ is going to be a DLP projector in a light-controlled room.


I think LCD and Plasma are fine for computer use but seem to be to " harsh " for movies, with LCD being more harsh than Plasma. Image burn-in is STILL a problem with Plasma, especially if left on news channels with tickers or hooked to a computer. My friend bought a plasma and has it hooked to a computer about 70% of the time and, even with pixel-shifting, it had issues with burn-in. The burn-in elimination routine in the set worked OK but it did not get rid of it completely.


I've had my DLP since mid-2007 and have replaced two lamps and the DMD. My lamps lasted about 4800 hours each and the DMD lasted 10400 hours. I will probably have to replace the fans and possibly the color wheel within the next two years. That will be less than $100 total. I already have two extra lamps as backups. It is a good idea to keep a spare lamp on hand just in case.


No one makes DLP RPTVs, so what is out there now is all there will be. Parts will become harder and harder to find, especially after the mandatory 3 year parts stock runs out.


I'm good with electronics and building computers, so having a DLP and doing the maintenance is extremely easy for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Wow thank you for all the informative replies! I'm almost leaning towards a plasma. Not because of a dislike of DLPTVs but the more I read about them and what I read here, I don't know if my living room set up would allow for it. I have this entertainment unit: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004B1C32W/ref=oh_details_o09_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 which does not allow my center channel to sit anywhere but the top shelf, which means I need to wall mount my TV. And I also don't know if I need a special stand for DLPTVs and I really don't want to replace my current one as I love it's look and I just got it in January. So DLPTVs can't be wall mounted from what I read.


I've built my own PC builds for the past 15 years or so and I definitely feel comfortable messing around inside electronics so that part I'd be fine with. The other thing is the fact that DLPs are no longer being produced so I don't know how scarce parts will become.


I almost bought one the other day. I was so close but something stopped me and as much as I would love a 73 inch TV with theater quality image, I don't think my living room set up allows for it no matter how much I want it to.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lethean  /t/1468068/question-about-rptvs#post_23212162


Wow thank you for all the informative replies! I'm almost leaning towards a plasma. Not because of a dislike of DLPTVs but the more I read about them and what I read here, I don't know if my living room set up would allow for it. I have this entertainment unit: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004B1C32W/ref=oh_details_o09_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 which does not allow my center channel to sit anywhere but the top shelf, which means I need to wall mount my TV. And I also don't know if I need a special stand for DLPTVs and I really don't want to replace my current one as I love it's look and I just got it in January. So DLPTVs can't be wall mounted from what I read.


I've built my own PC builds for the past 15 years or so and I definitely feel comfortable messing around inside electronics so that part I'd be fine with. The other thing is the fact that DLPs are no longer being produced so I don't know how scarce parts will become.


I almost bought one the other day. I was so close but something stopped me and as much as I would love a 73 inch TV with theater quality image, I don't think my living room set up allows for it no matter how much I want it to.

That's the main thing. You have to work within the constraints of your room. Most folks with DLP RPTV will sometimes build a false wall to give the illusion of a wall-mounted TV. That works if you also have non-ported, direct-radiating speakers that can also be "recessed" into the fake wall.


Plasmas are OK. They are just heavy and consume about as much power as a DLP set. They aren't that hard to fix unless the panel itself fails and those cost $300 to $500 depending on the size. The other formatter boards and such usually run $70 to $200 and there can be several of these boards in the set. Some sets are divided up into 9 sections, so 9 small boards about the size of PC memory but twice as long. I've worked with a lot of plasma displays in a video production setting. They are basically on 24/7 and none have lasted longer than 4 years before the panel failed. ALL TV's are pretty-much disposable items these days. The main this is getting one that can be easily repaired.
 
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