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Discussion Starter #1
Hello

Not sure if this thread is in the correct place, but I'm quite newbie to the whole monitor calibration and color temperature affairs.

But lately I've found the colors way to saturated in my ASUS monitor (VH242H) and I've decided to mess around with the settings. I always heard that the color temperature should be close to 6500K (Usually the warm preset)

But when I messed around with my monitor HW settings, there was this option sRGB (Along with Warm, Cold, Normal, User Defined) which locked in place every other setting (Brightness, Contrast, etc) except for Sharpness.


And... well, it resembles something close to the theater mode, but colors seem true to themselves, but everything seems to be very grey now... but very easy on the eyes, colors are clearly differentiated, and I can see details I could not see before in images (Like different shades of black or grey). It both feels the colors are corrected and at the same time, I lost a lot of color and brightness.


So what I ask is... what the heck did I do? Is this optimal? Is this even close to what a calibrated screen should show?


I'm quite afraid of making this thread, I usually come to these forums to look for information regarding HTPCs and other hardware I obtain for me and my friends, but I never ever delved in color calibration. This forum should have a newbie section for us to make these stupid questions!


P.S Be gentle!
 

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sRGB is the standard for web and one of a few different ones for the PC, but it's one of the most agreed upon and utilized.


sRGB defines the color of red, green, blue a white and the way black ramps it's brightness towards white.


The mode on your monitor is likely the most accurate to the standard, but how accurate it actually is would require you to measure it.


The reason it looks dim is that sRGB mode typically targets ~100 cd/m^2 . cd/m^2 is candelas per square meter, the metric unit for an amount of light. Typically monitors can do 250-300 cd/m^2, some even more, so sRGB cuts way down on the amount of light the monitor is outputting. On the upside that should also give you much better blacks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Quote:
Originally Posted by sotti
sRGB is the standard for web and one of a few different ones for the PC, but it's one of the most agreed upon and utilized.


sRGB defines the color of red, green, blue a white and the way black ramps it's brightness towards white.


The mode on your monitor is likely the most accurate to the standard, but how accurate it actually is would require you to measure it.


The reason it looks dim is that sRGB mode typically targets ~100 cd/m^2 . cd/m^2 is candelas per square meter, the metric unit for an amount of light. Typically monitors can do 250-300 cd/m^2, some even more, so sRGB cuts way down on the amount of light the monitor is outputting. On the upside that should also give you much better blacks.
Hello!

Thanks for the reply


So sRGB is a standard? I'll research into it.


Yes one of the great improvements I've noticed is that the blacks are really blacks, or at least according to some .mp4 files I got here from AVS forums concerning screen calibrations. Just played one concerning Black clippings and I've noticed the black is really black where it's supposed to.


So, all I lose is indeed in brightness levels? Seems like a good tradeoff, other than the wow factor, big brightness levels all they do is hurt my eyes on extended use of the monitor.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkanius
Hello!

Thanks for the reply


So sRGB is a standard? I'll research into it.


Yes one of the great improvements I've noticed is that the blacks are really blacks, or at least according to some .mp4 files I got here from AVS forums concerning screen calibrations. Just played one concerning Black clippings and I've noticed the black is really black where it's supposed to.


So, all I lose is indeed in brightness levels? Seems like a good tradeoff, other than the wow factor, big brightness levels all they do is hurt my eyes on extended use of the monitor.
Here is a link to the sRGB spec: http://www.color.org/chardata/rgb/srgb.xalter


You are correct, very bright displays make them pop and helps sell them, but they make your eyes hurt and your blacks a little gray.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hello again!


So it's a standard or in my case, a default monitor configuration from ASUS so it respects the sRGB standard or at least, get close to it?


After a few hours of testing this, I find this setting to be very enjoyable, it's very easy on the eyes, and every colour is distinguishable and there is no over saturation anywhere


Sorry if I'm sounding repetitive but it's truly great! It's like I've rediscovered color monitors again.


Say, why don't most monitors/televisions come with such configuration? I know/heard that most brands try to get as many digital enhancements and shortcuts to raise the contrast ratio so the monitors/tvsets standout in the shops, but they should all have a "calibrated" setting most of the times. (Movie presets from most brands are usually very good, but always need adjustments)
 
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