AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 104 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello there:


I've been reading about what type of studs should I use for drywall and most of articles I read says 24'' OC stud frames.


Can somebody tell me what does the 24'' OC means ?


Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,204 Posts
OC = On center. The measurement from the middle of one stud to the middle of the center of the next stud is 24 inches. Most homes are built 16" OC, but for sound proofing 24" is better when coupled with the other sound proofing construction techniques (decoupling, mass, dampening).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,780 Posts
If you had a single stud wall, then 25 ga. steel studs would be best. They are more resilient than wood studs.


24" on center spacing is better than 16" in a single stud (coupled) wall. This is true whether the studs are wood or steel.


In a decoupled scenario (staggered studs, double studs, clips & channel, etc) the stud spacing matters less. The stud material also is less of an issue. Could be wood or steel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well in my case my apartment has a common 6" concrete block wall (plastered and painted in both sides) with my neighbors so I'm planning to add a separate layer of drywal to this walll, I was considering using QuietRock 516 or 525 but still not sure if they worth the extra $$$.


Any suggestions on this matter??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmhc /forum/post/18182294


Well in my case my apartment has a common 6" concrete block wall (plastered and painted in both sides) with my neighbors so I'm planning to add a separate layer of drywal to this walll, I was considering using QuietRock 516 or 525 but still not sure if they worth the extra $$$.


Any suggestions on this matter??

You're adding a wall to an apartment?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Leifashley27 /forum/post/18182311


You're adding a wall to an apartment?

Yes, where I'm planning to build my HT room has the common wall with my neighbor, so I was thinking to build a room within a room in that space.
 

·
RETIRED theater builder
Joined
·
36,385 Posts
I think the question is do you own or rent. When people say apartment we normally think rental, Condo we think owned. If you build this stud wall be sure it is separated from the concrete wall by at least a 1/2 inch. That way you isolate any vibrations.
 

·
RETIRED theater builder
Joined
·
36,385 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmhc /forum/post/18182294


I was considering using QuietRock 516 or 525 but still not sure if they worth the extra $$$.

Any suggestions on this matter??


Using Quietrock or double drywall with Green Glue will both aid in reducing sound transfer. You should evaluate the overall cost of both systems and your ability work with the products.


Doing just the walls without addressing the floors, ceilings, and other issues may result in disappointing results.


Maybe there is a Link somewhere of a comparison of the two approaches.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,780 Posts
When comparing pre-damped drywall, consider the resulting weight of the wall. Mass is king and there is no substitute. I have seen pre-damped drywall companies marketing their low-weight board as a benefit... Nothing could be farther from the truth and they are relying on the fact that consumers just don't know any better.


Also, if there isn't a formal test report available for a product, there is something being hidden.


I can say this fairly categorically: There is no scenario where you will not get a better result by using more massive drywall locally ($6 a sheet) and damping this wall in the field. The results are much less cost, much higher performance, even considering the labor to install a second sheet.


Adding a 1/2" sheet of pre-damped drywall means you're spending a great deal for minimal results. Much, much better to use two sheets of 1/2", 3'8", 1/2" or 5/8" and damp yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/18182439


I think the question is do you own or rent. When people say apartment we normally think rental, Condo we think owned. If you build this stud wall be sure it is separated from the concrete wall by at least a 1/2 inch. That way you isolate any vibrations.

Yes I own it, what I'm planning to do is to use 2x2 wood or metal studs and add a layer of drywall or Quiet Rock, use Green Glue between studs and drywall and then add 2 or 3 inches of fiberglass, about the space i was planning to separate the wall about 1 inch from it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/18182472


Using Quietrock or double drywall with Green Glue will both aid in reducing sound transfer. You should evaluate the overall cost of both systems and your ability work with the products.


Doing just the walls without addressing the floors, ceilings, and other issues may result in disappointing results.


Maybe there is a Link somewhere of a comparison of the two approaches.

.


I was planning to insolate floor and ceiling too, but since they are made of solid concrete (about 8 inch) I guess don't need that much work on them, or do I??


Now here is where I'm undecided, Quiet Rock is more expensive than normal drywall, even the lowest models, so what I'm trying to know is if a single layer of Quiet Rock 516 or 510 does a much better job than a single layer of 5/8 drywall that they cost 300% or more per sheet??.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,974 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmhc /forum/post/18182704


Yes I own it, what I'm planning to do is to use 2x2 wood or metal studs and add a layer of drywall or Quiet Rock, use Green Glue between studs and drywall and then add 2 or 3 inches of fiberglass, about the space i was planning to separate the wall about 1 inch from it.


.

GG is to be used between two sheets of drywall or between a layer of OSB and drywall, with the first being the preferred method. Using GG between the studs and drywall will not do you much good and will be a waste of money.

Quote:
I was planning to insolate floor and ceiling too, but since they are made of solid concrete (about 8 inch) I guess don't need that much work on them, or do I??

Insulate or isolate? If you are trying to isolate then you need to work on a solution for all parts of the room, including the ceiling and floor.

Quote:
Now here is where I'm undecided, Quiet Rock is more expensive than normal drywall, even the lowest models, so what I'm trying to know is if a single layer of Quiet Rock 516 or 510 does a much better job than a single layer of 5/8 drywall that they cost 300% or more per sheet??.

See Ted's post above. Not worth it! Use 2 sheets of 5/8" and dampen yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,536 Posts
I found this site to be an educational read on this subject. From what i can tell, the things you are planning to do seem to not be in line with what they say is needed to get good sound isolation. Which leads me to believe you have a decent chance that the results of your plans and efforts will be disappointing / sub-optimal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by In2Photos /forum/post/18183015



Insulate or isolate? If you are trying to isolate then you need to work on a solution for all parts of the room, including the ceiling and floor.

What I meant was that I'm planning to apply some soundproof solution to floor and ceiling as well, just dont' know what exactly I'm I going to do with them yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,204 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gertjan /forum/post/18183265


I found this site to be an educational read on this subject. From what i can tell, the things you are planning to do seem to not be in line with what they say is needed to get good sound isolation. Which leads me to believe you have a decent chance that the results of your plans and efforts will be disappointing / sub-optimal.

Gertjan - Ted, who has been responding to the OP question, runs that company.
Just thought you should know.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,399 Posts
I read the title and half expected to see this photo:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,536 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathan /forum/post/18184092


Gertjan - Ted, who has been responding to the OP question, runs that company.
Just thought you should know.

Yeah, i didn't even notice that it was him who replied
Thanks for pointing it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gertjan /forum/post/18183265


I found this site to be an educational read on this subject. From what i can tell, the things you are planning to do seem to not be in line with what they say is needed to get good sound isolation. Which leads me to believe you have a decent chance that the results of your plans and efforts will be disappointing / sub-optimal.

Here is what I'm planning to do, with my wall.


With both sides plastered the concrete wall is about 8 inch tick, the picture says 6 inch because that's the non plastered block size. I'm also planning to treat both floor and ceiling, but not sure how I'm going to do it yet.




As far as I can see I'm covering the 4 aspects the article mentioned, decoupling, absorption, mass and damping.

Will that be a good soundproofing solution?? please let me know if there is something that I'm missing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,780 Posts
You're on the right track.


#1. If that air cavity could be deeper, that would shift the resonance point down a bit more. Better low frequency performance.


#2. Look at double 5/8" drywall. Mass is a big deal.


#3. 2x4 studs would be more stable and make for a higher performance deeper air cavity. Attach them 16" on center.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted White /forum/post/18188361


You're on the right track.


#1. If that air cavity could be deeper, that would shift the resonance point down a bit more. Better low frequency performance.


#2. Look at double 5/8" drywall. Mass is a big deal.


#3. 2x4 studs would be more stable and make for a higher performance deeper air cavity. Attach them 16" on center.

.



Thank you Ted, I'll see what I can do about the bigger studs, I don't think my space will alow me to do that but I'll check it out anyway.


One more question, is there a rule on the dampening thing I mean a guide for apllying Green Glue??.
 
1 - 20 of 104 Posts
Top