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im new to this ht stuff so please excusse my stupidy and mis spells i have a sharp xge1200u projector i have it wired right now with a cheep s video cable i bought off ebay its around 50 feet long im wondering if there is a better way to hook up this video feed on the projector there is only a weird coax type and s video hook up my picture is kinda poor the color mainly ive blew out thye inside with an air can that helped alot the bulb only has 700 hours so that shouldnt be the problem im just wondering if the cheap cable could be the probloem ive tried to hook up a coax cable with the weird end but got no picture is there a different setting i should use and if so how do i change the setting to accept coax ide rather use the s video cable but im pretty sure someone will say cheap cables are whats killing my picture if so i need to know where to buy a s video cable for a good price thats around 50 feet thats whats required to run from front where the equipment is located PLEASE HELP:confused: :confused:
 

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sometimes cables can be a bottleneck, but what is the actual source? Is it a high definition box? dvd player? regular analog cable? if your feeding it a weak signal, it will give you crappy picture quality. Also your extremely long run(50ft) isnt helping much either.
 

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First, before going to huge expense and trouble by throwing specialized cables at this problem, make sure that that is your problem. Use a high quality, very short S-video cable (

It looks like that projector has S-Video (as you know), composite (which you will likely find lower quality than S-Video), VGA, and RGBHV. The latter uses five 75 ohm coaxial cables to transfer RGB and two Sync channels (horizontal and vertical). All of the single coax connections on this machine use BNC connectors. I'm assuming that your source is a DVD player likely with Component outputs (YPbPr) along with the S-Video that you are using now. If you are using something like a satellite reciever as the source who's highest quality output is S-Video, you will have to approach this differently. If available, RGBHV, component, or VGA sources will provide the best color and picture, all other things being equal. The next in quality would be S-Video.


If you are wanting to watch DVD's, and possibly TV sources on this projector, you might want to consider using a PC for source. Hooking the PC up to this projector is easy...you could use the DB-15 input (regular VGA input, like a monitor), but for such a long run, you would likely be better off using a short VGA to RGBHV breakout cable from your PC and making the 50 foot run with a high quality RGBHV cable that terminates with BNC connectors. you could even make this fairly easily with RG6 or RG59 cable, but for one cable, having it made would prove more economical. These individual, high gauge, shielded coax cables will likely resist degredation of signal and interferance better than a super long VGA cable, or cheap S-Video cable for that matter. Even if you can't or don't want to use a PC for your source, you will still need to use either the S-Video input or RGBHV input (which, by the way, is the same type of input as the VGA input...just with different terminators). To use the RGBHV input with a cable as described above with a source that outputs Component (YPbPr), you will need a "Component to RGBHV" converter. Just search for that term on google, and you will find many sources. It will likely cost between $100 and $200 for this converter, though, NOT including the cable.


Finally, if you just want to stick with S-Video, there is still hope (assuming that your issues ARE caused by the cable). Buy a high quality, shielded S-Video cable. Again, you could make one using two 75 ohm coax cables and S-Video connections on each end, or just buy a heavy gauge S-video cable that is sheilded and intended for long runs.


Good luck. I hope it works out for you.
 

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A search for RG6 or RG59 and S-Video showed a few people doing it, but no detailed instructions. Try google. It can be as simple as buying two S-Video solder terminators from Radio Shack and two, two conductor 75 ohm cables (like RG59 or RG6 coax...RG59 is much easier to work with around corners and such and won't make a quality difference for your application) and soldering them to the terminators in the same pattern. There are likely crimp connectors as well out there that may provide a longer lasting cable. Here is probably your best option, though. Try to buy a high quality cable from a place like http://www.cablestogo.com . I can't vouch for any of this cable (I don't use S-Video that long), but places like this will likely have high grades of cable for long runs.


Before you do this, though, I again stress that you try it first by moving your equipment close for a test, and use a 1 or 2 meter, high quality S-Video cable to see if you achieve the picture you want. There are so many other things that could be wrong, you really should test this first. Happy cabling....
 

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Here's a source that I used for cables for my Sharp XG-E1200U and they work great. I am running 35' of cable from my PC (which acts as a DVD player and TV Tuner) using their VGA cables. I also have their 50' S-Video cable and 5 lengths of RG6Q running for use in the future. The picture is so good using the VGA cable, its actually better than connecting with a cheap 6' monitor cable that I had lying around. Good luck,

Bob

(oops, can't put in URL. Do a google search on Network Technologies Inc., or E-mail me for the URL)


BTW, prices are pretty good, too.
 
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