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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This question may have been addressed previously on this site, but I'd appreciate any comments you may have.


First, I am under the impression (perhaps mistakenly so) that sound quality will be better--even if only incrimentally--if sources are connected to my receiver via optical cable versus component cable. If there is no difference, then I have no issues. Any thoughts on this?


Basis my belief in the above, herein lies the rub: I'm setting up a second home surround type set up in the basement and at this point have an older receiver to work with. This receiver has only one optical cable input. I'll be wanting to hook up two audio sources to this receiver via optical cable (from Blu-ray player and from HD cable box).


So, I'm thinking that I will need an optical cable switch or splitter to combine the two sources into one. I found one on Monoprice that will seem to do the trick:

http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...seq=1&format=2


However, I am not crazy about having to manually perform the "switch" every time I want to use the Blu-ray (plus getting my wife to understand this concept is a whole other issue!). Does anyone know of another optical switch/splitter that will solve combining two sources into one imput without the whole manual switching process? I've seen something like this:

http://www.redtag.com/products/a802848629.html


Which says it will automatically sense which source is powered on, and transmit that through to the receiver. However, what if they are BOTH powered on (again, wife issue)?


(Thanks in advance. First time poster long time reader. The knowledge on this site is pretty impressive)
 

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Quote:
First, I am under the impression (perhaps mistakenly so) that sound quality will be better--even if only incrimentally--if sources are connected to my receiver via optical cable versus component cable.

If by "component cable" you mean coax, then no, there is no difference in sound quality, both types of interface carry SPDIF
 

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First of all,you need to get your terminology correct.


Optical cable carries a digital audio signal.


Component cable carries an analog video signal.


Perhaps you meant optical cable and two-channel analog audio (left/right RCA connector type cables). Yes, there is a difference in quality. Optical cable will transmit legacy surround codecs (DD and DTS) up to 5.1 channels. Two-channel analog audio cable will transmit,well, two-channel analog audio.


Any kind on splitter/switch will require training for you wife. You may as well face up to that and just train her. I'm sure she can handle it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesky636 /forum/post/18100825


First of all,you need to get your terminology correct.


Optical cable carries a digital audio signal.


Component cable carries an analog video signal.


Perhaps you meant optical cable and two-channel analog audio (left/right RCA connector type cables). Yes, there is a difference in quality. Optical cable will transmit legacy surround codecs (DD and DTS) up to 5.1 channels. Two-channel analog audio cable will transmit,well, two-channel analog audio.


Any kind on splitter/switch will require training for you wife. You may as well face up to that and just train her. I'm sure she can handle it.

Yes, I did mean the analog audio L/R--thank you for correcting/clarifying. Okay, so I was correct on assumpiong optical (digital) cable would be better.


Now I just need to figure out the best splitter/switch for me.


LOL on training the wife--currently she is trying to DOWNGRADE her cell phone from a touch phone to an Amish model so it is easier to use/understand!
 

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does either of your sources (blu-ray or cable box) have a digital audio coaxial cable connection (typical screw type "F" connection, usually with a orange insulator around the center hole as a color designator) along with the Toslink optical connector ? Some devices have both outputs for digital audio and your receiver should have at least one audio coax connection along with the single optical input.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys. Upon further review, the Blu-ray does have a coax out for audio. When I was at the office yesterday I was thinking it did not for some reason. So, problem solved. Thanks for the input (and the chuckle).
 
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