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I was over my friends house last night for dinner, then after dinner the men folk went upstairs to play Xbox and hang out. So we start playing and Matt (my friend ) tells me about a warning that he read in the instruction manual of the game stating " how it could be dangerous to play video games on an RPTV" now my question is why . I know about burn in but I thought that burn in only happend on tube type TV's because of the how the pixel was projected in the tube. Seeing that the guns (red blue and green) are the tools doing the projection and not one but all three are need to do the work how is this possible. I mean if you have a CRT front projector and a wall and leave something up for a long time it doesn't burn into the wall. or does it burn into the lamp? I'm not sure how this works someone please help.. I have a 51" Hitachi that I play Videos games on all the time.. don't want burn in.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by John_danek
I was over my friends house last night for dinner, then after dinner the men folk went upstairs to play Xbox and hang out. So we start playing and Matt (my friend ) tells me about a warning that he read in the instruction manual of the game stating " how it could be dangerous to play video games on an RPTV" now my question is why . I know about burn in but I thought that burn in only happend on tube type TV's because of the how the pixel was projected in the tube. Seeing that the guns (red blue and green) are the tools doing the projection and not one but all three are need to do the work how is this possible. I mean if you have a CRT front projector and a wall and leave something up for a long time it doesn't burn into the wall. or does it burn into the lamp? I'm not sure how this works someone please help.. I have a 51" Hitachi that I play Videos games on all the time.. don't want burn in.
John the question you are asking is answered in a sticky note at the top of this forum. But in short:


Burn in can occur from prolonged periods of viewing the same image or portion of an image. If you play 5 hours of a racing game, the speedometer graphic and other items are constantly displayed. That 'burns' in that part of the screen faster than a constantly moving image. The same can happen from the 'black bars' at the top/bottom if they are left on constantly. Never leave your RPTV on unattened with a video screen on, or a movie paused for prolonged periods of time.


That answer may not be 100% accurate , you can find more detail in the sticky note or do a search on burn in at the top of the forum.
 

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Unless you have a LCD RPTV (possibly DLP as well).


With CRT RPTV's you still have the CRT which still gets the burn in .
 

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It's not the wall that gets burned in (in the case of your projector), but the phosphors in the CRT guns that get burned (or worn unevenly). Projectors are even more prone to burning due to the fact they are driven much harder than in a traditional CRT television.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by jfischer
It's not the wall that gets burned in (in the case of your projector), but the phosphors in the CRT guns that get burned (or worn unevenly). Projectors are even more prone to burning due to the fact they are driven much harder than in a traditional CRT television.


Yes. The phoshors on the face of the CRTs inside a CRT based RPTV are what get bombarded by the electrons, and ANY fixed image left up there for any length of time will eventually burn itself into that set of phosphors prematurely.


The actual definition of screenburn is uneven phosphor aging/wear. A fixed image gets constantly bombarded in the same place consistently, eventually wearing away its phosphors, and sometimes this is only on one particular color, of the 3 CRTs that are in your Hitachi. Or not wearing them away as fast as the surrounding areas, as in the case of a blank, black PIP box left up there.


If you want to see screenburn really bad, go to any arcade and find the CRT based games which leave the passive entry graphics up there interminably, waiting for someone to come play...


DLP, LCOS and LCD will not screenburn, and are preferable over CRT technology as the family babysitter.


However, none of those formats has superceded CRT technology for the ultimate in high resolution. For actual breathtaking home theater performance, nothing beats CRT.


I still prefer fully calibrated CRT technology, some of which you can see as the front cover of my website, if you want to see some finely calibrated CRT work.



Mr Bob
 
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