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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
when i last shopped for a tv, i rarely saw 60hz tv's for sale that did 1080p, most of the tv's were either 720p 60hz or 1080p 120hz... im now seeing new tv's that are 1080p @ 60hz and 120hz, however there is usually a $100 difference.


are there any reasons why the new tv's are coming back to 60hz? cheaper to produce? "technically" the same? most people wont notice?


im looking for a new 1080p 120hz tv in the 600-700 range, however most of the TVs in this range are only 60hz....
 

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What you saw before was that almost all 60Hz 1080p TVs would not accept 1080p as an input resoluition since there was not sources of 1080p content, Their video receiver chips would only accept 480i. 480p, 720p, or 1080i. With the intoduction of Blu-Ray DVD players the receiver chips have been upgraded to also accept 1080p/60 or 1080p/24. Also prior to the introduction of the 2008 models there were very few 120Hz TV models available other then with 3D capable DLP RPTVs.
 

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Everything indicates that at some point, will stop issuing resolution HDTV 720p (not know, maybe 2 or 3 years) or at least, 720p leaving for the lesser of 32 "(applied in HDTV, PC monitors do not), , insurance is cheaper for the manufacturer let alone its assembly line for HDTV 1080p and this have influenced what the potential buyer in the advertising, expos or general info on the internet, sure there will be fewer buyers asking their 720p.



maybe the same thing happens in the future with the 60Hz vs 120/240Hz, say time puts everything in place, spend the years and the most basic tv more features are added that before were only high-end.



which TV did you see?, what size?, shop online or physically?



With a 60hz equally enjoy your TV, but if you're interested in what 120hz, will pay the bid price or wait for some 2009 model with % discount.


 

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As mentioned in an earlier thread, virtually all LCD tv's prior to 2009 were either 720p/1080i/1080p/60Hz. LCD was first to offer 1080p and it proved a strong selling point. Plasma manufacturers stepped up to 1080p in 2008 and began pushing 600Hz refresh rate as selling point, as well as deep blacks, etc. LCD manufacturers have had difficulty in producing deep blacks due to the black light requirement, so multiple Hz refresh rates were introduced as selling feature to address motion flow and jaggies. Initially 120Hz, and now 240Hz. (LED sets are latest sets to addres backlight issue). Increasing the refresh rate requires additional signal processing. To perform this properly becomes more expensive. The higher tier sets do a better job. A website which provides reviews which include motionflow is

http://www.televisioninfo.com/d/reviews.htm
 

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As pointed out in another thread 720P will be around for several more years at least since it is 1366x768 720p panels that are used for the heavy duty commercial monitor displays since they are easily programed. A higher resolutions is not required or desired for commercial use.
 

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As mentioned in an earlier thread, virtually all LCD tv's prior to 2009 were either 720p/1080i/1080p/60Hz. LCD was first to offer 1080p and it proved a strong selling point. Plasma manufacturers stepped up to 1080p in 2008 and began pushing 600Hz refresh rate as selling point, as well as deep blacks, etc. LCD manufacturers have had difficulty in producing deep blacks due to the black light requirement, so multiple Hz refresh rates were introduced as selling feature to address motion flow and jaggies. Initially 120Hz, and now 240Hz. (LED sets are latest sets to addres backlight issue). Increasing the refresh rate requires additional signal processing. To perform this properly becomes more expensive. The higher tier sets do a better job.


As far as how well higher refresh rates rank, the hierarchy is this:


1) True 240 hz

2) Quasi 240, which is 120 Hz with a scanning back-light

3) 120 Hz

4) 60 Hz


Even so, the degree of motion blur reduction has a whole lot to do with how well implemented the higher frame rate is.


There are 120 Hz sets that do no better with motion blur reduction than 60 hz sets. Also, we don't yet know how the forthcoming 480 Hz sets are going to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
thx for the replies, im looking for a 40 or 42 inch for my room, with a 12' viewing distance.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by yukon04 /forum/post/18182043


As mentioned in an earlier thread, virtually all LCD tv's prior to 2009 were either 720p/1080i/1080p/60Hz. LCD was first to offer 1080p and it proved a strong selling point. Plasma manufacturers stepped up to 1080p in 2008 and began pushing 600Hz refresh rate as selling point, as well as deep blacks, etc.

Time flies when you're having fun. You better check those dates again.


I'm holding a "Holiday" (December 2007) Crutchfield catalog and looking at the Flat Panel LCD statistics page.


120Hz refresh rate native 1080p LCD HDTVs listed with 1080p compatible HDMI input;


Mitsubishi LT-xx144 series

Samsung LN-Txx71F series

Sony XBR4 & XBR5 40" or larger

Toshiba Cinema xxLX177 series


Of the 60 LCD HDTV models/sizes shown in that Crutchfield catalog,

42 of them are native 1080p with 1080p compatible input, and 17 of those 42 are 120Hz.


And in plasma, Panasonic TH-xxPZ700U and Samsung FP-Txx84 had 1080p sets.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by xbbdc /forum/post/18180428


when i last shopped for a tv, i rarely saw 60hz tv's for sale that did 1080p, most of the tv's were either 720p 60hz or 1080p 120hz... im now seeing new tv's that are 1080p @ 60hz and 120hz, however there is usually a $100 difference.


are there any reasons why the new tv's are coming back to 60hz? cheaper to produce? "technically" the same? most people wont notice?


im looking for a new 1080p 120hz tv in the 600-700 range, however most of the TVs in this range are only 60hz....

You may be seeing more 60Hz models because there are many more manufacturers and models of LCD HDTVs available then in the past.


It all has to do with marketing the latest improvement to technology targeted at the higher price units, and then trickling down.

720p panels are being phased out for LCD HDTV use, so 1080p panels first used on higher price units is becoming more common regardless of the refresh rate.


Now, lower (advertised) pixel response times and higher refresh rates are the marketing ploy to get a consumer to move up to a higher priced model.


In the price range/size that you specified, finding 1080p and 120Hz in a moderate to good quality brand may be limited to open box or closeouts.


If you aren't a fanatic about motion blur and a little film judder in movies doesn't bother you, 60Hz will suffice.

Only if you are sure that you will never want to take advantage of 120Hz motion enhancements, would I recommend a 60Hz set.


However, if you can afford the small price difference, buying a model with the 120hz motion features whether you choose to use them or not would be my recommendation.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by walford /forum/post/18183066


There are some reviews that state that the use of scanning Backlight or the insertion of blank frames for a 200 or 240 Hz LCD may produce an image with less motion blur then a "true 200 or 240Hz" implementation does.

See the following link from an Austraslian review:

http://www.bigbrownbox.com.au/lg-37l...37-full-hd-lcd

In the Consumer Reports test of the LG55LH90 (with TruMotion 240 hz) it discusses the fact that this is a "quasi 240" design. In other words, it is a 120 Hz with a scanning back-light.


This is what CR had to say about motion blur reduction in the 55LH90.


"Has LG's TruMotion 240 technology that combines a 120Hz refresh rate with a scanning (flashing) backlight to create a 240Hz-like effect - we found it very effectively reduced motion blur, just short of the best models.


According to CR, the Sony 52XBR9 (which is a true 240Hz) did a better job of reducing motion blur than any model with a "quasi 240" design.


Please feel free to believe anything you want to from some Australian web site...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by spyboy /forum/post/18184081


"Has LG's TruMotion 240 technology that combines a 120Hz refresh rate with a scanning (flashing) backlight to create a 240Hz-like effect - we found it very effectively reduced motion blur, just short of the best models.
Just short of introducing 240Hz interpolation artifacts.


Doesn't CNET still claim that they can't tell the difference between 60Hz/120Hz/240Hz even when viewing fast action sports?

Quote:
Originally Posted by spyboy /forum/post/18184081


Please feel free to believe anything you want to from some Australian web site...

The Australian model introduces a black frame with the following text in white?


BUY A PLASMA
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beeper /forum/post/18184175

Just short of introducing interpolation artifacts.


Doesn't CNET still claim that they can't tell the difference between 60Hz/120Hz/240Hz even when viewing fast action sports?




The Australian model introduces a black frame with the following text in white?


BUY A PLASMA

CNET isn't the only source that can't tell the difference, you might as well cite DisplayMate...


Believe anything you want to with regards to motion blur reduction...


"Keen eyed viewers might notice softening of textures or edges in sports, action movies, and video games, or in a moving text ticker. But they might see little if any difference between the best and blurriest sets in sitcoms, dramas, and news stories."
 

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They'll have to pry my 240Hz LCD out of my cold, dead hands.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sharkcohen /forum/post/18184524


They'll have to pry my 240Hz LCD out of my cold, dead hands.

Won't 480Hz relax your muscles?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beeper /forum/post/18184587


Won't 480Hz relax your muscles?

Nah, I'm happy with my 52B750. I'm not going to be making another TV purchase for a while.
 
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