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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm about to buy an spl meter to try out a manual calibration (since its supposed to be more accurate). Ok so is an spl meter only used to calibrate the db level of each individual channel? Should the crossover settings, EQ and everything else be left up to the all mighty audyssey calibration on my denon 989?


If it is just for changing individual db levels, I know the target is 75 db for each channel, what about the sub, and what should the master volume on the receiver and sub line be set at? Do I just use the test tones on my Denon?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by samsam7 /forum/post/15530748


I'm about to buy an spl meter to try out a manual calibration (since its supposed to be more accurate). Ok so is an spl meter only used to calibrate the db level of each individual channel? Should the crossover settings, EQ and everything else be left up to the all mighty audyssey calibration on my denon 989?


If it is just for changing individual db levels, I know the target is 75 db for each channel, what about the sub, and what should the master volume on the receiver and sub line be set at? Do I just use the test tones on my Denon?

I would only use the SPL meter to trim the main channel levels and not the Subwoofer. Most of Audyssey's power is concretrated in the low frequencies so I would be very careful about fooling with the LFE's level.


More than likely you will have to check the crossover settings. Audyssey reports the -3dB points of each speaker to the AVR and the AVR then determines the crossover settings. Watch out here, most of the time the AVR will set a speaker pair to "large" when they should almost always be set to something more like 80Hz or just small if your AVR does not allow for specific crossover frequency settings.


As for you last set of questions, yes set the master volume control to "0", use the internal test tones, and set the speaker levels to 75dB at the main listening point. Again, I would not adjust the subwoofer level unless you really do not like the results after listening to your system. As you will see, when using the SPL meter the subwoofer measurements jump all over the place making it very difficult to get a good reading. Let Audyssey handle this one.


I highly recommend that you read the Setup Guide at the following link: http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...5#post14456895
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
another question, whats the more preferred spl meter. the RS digital meter or the RS analog meter?


and i assume the correction tables only apply for sub calibrations?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by samsam7 /forum/post/15530748


I'm about to buy an spl meter to try out a manual calibration (since its supposed to be more accurate). Ok so is an spl meter only used to calibrate the db level of each individual channel? Should the crossover settings, EQ and everything else be left up to the all mighty audyssey calibration on my denon 989?

I would not recommend you change anything based on the RS meter. If you run Audyssey correctly, it will be more accurate than the meter readings.
 

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Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson /forum/post/15536829


I would not recommend you change anything based on the RS meter. If you run Audyssey correctly, it will be more accurate than the meter readings.

I agree Kal, but one constantly read posts from people recommennding using a SPL meter to trim levels. I always wondered why folks think that a cheap SPL meter is more accurate than Audyssey. Oh well, guess it makes them feel better to actually "see" measurements.


OP, as for the meter, if you are going to buy one, either is OK. Most seem to prefer the analog version, however I have owned/used both and have the digital version now.
 

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If you look beyond trimming levels, an SPL will also let you map out freq. response of a room. Taming a room's natural response is better than trying to force a correction electronically.
 

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Originally Posted by iresq /forum/post/15541308


If you look beyond trimming levels, an SPL will also let you map out freq. response of a room. Taming a room's natural response is better than trying to force a correction electronically.

The SPL is a poor tool for this, especially in the bass where one wants to distinguish room modes from more trivial frequency variations. Also, even an RTA is much more convenient than an SPL meter that measures one signal at a time and requires you to write down the results.
 

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What ticks me off, and why I bought an SPL meter, is when I ran Audyysey, it set my fronts to full range, which they are not. If I then enable a crossover on the fronts, then the bass output gets dramatically reduced, so I have to bump up the subwoofer.


My receiver played pink noise, and I used that to set everything to 75 db, including the sub. It was a pain in the butt re-adjusting everything (I ended up just redoing all the channels), since I could get a 4db difference by moving 2 feet to the left or right, or how I was holding the meter.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by sparkysko /forum/post/15559732


What ticks me off, and why I bought an SPL meter, is when I ran Audyysey, it set my fronts to full range, which they are not. If I then enable a crossover on the fronts, then the bass output gets dramatically reduced, so I have to bump up the subwoofer.

I believe that you have a setup problem somewhere because what you are saying is not what should be happening. First, Audyssey only reports the -3dB points of each speaker to the AVR and then the AVR sets the crossover frequencies; large in your case. This is typical of most AVRs and is an issue with the manufacturer of the AVR not Audyssey.


After Audyssey has finished everyone has to check to make sure that the speaker sizes, or crossover frequences, are set correctly. That almost always means changing the speaker sizes to small, or a specific crossover frequency such as 80Hz. If the user has done everything properly, there will NOT be any reduction in bass, actually there should be an improvement.


Earlier in this thread, I posted a link to a very complete Audyssey Setup Guide. Everyone should use this guide; it is far better than anything else written about how to setup Audyssey. Bottom line as Kal mentioned, you should not need a SPL meter to setup your system.
 
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