AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Newbie question here. I want to combine my PC and TV setup into a HT setup. So I'm trying to see what I can best re-use, if thats even possible. Now I know that this is not the best thing since Multimedia equipment is already powered. But I think I'm pretty content with the 6.5" Logitech sub I have (I assume that by 6.5", that is the diameter of the driver). I did have a 10" Telex Sub (also multimedia), but the system died out on me recently so I can't consider using it. I'm just trying a simple 2.1 setup for now. Just need recommendations for how I would be able to connect the receiver (I still haven't bought one yet) to drive speakers and the Sub. Any help would be great.

I'm thinking of getting the Onkyo TXLR-552S for the receiver. Any recommends for the speakers, though I'd prefer floor standing ones?? Any help would be great. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
From your post, it looks like you want to use your PC speakers for HT? If that's the case, I would just use them as designed, driven from your PC. Not sure how to connect them to a receiver, most PC speaker setups have proprietary connectors and are already self powered. You could get a receiver and a new set of speakers, then hook up your PC to the receiver with spdif coax or toslink, that's pretty easy. Look into the HTPC section of this forum for more help.


If I misunderstood you, please clarify what you would like to do so we can better help you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
The problem is that no one can tell you what you're going to like the sound of. Determine what your budget is, and then do the research - there is no way around it unless you want to abdicate your buying decisions (not recommended).


You will have no trouble finding both professional and consumer reviews on the web. Spend a few hours reading about receivers and speakers in your price range. Once you've identified some models of interest, do your best to locate places where you can listen to the gear in person.


If you're planning to use the PC as one of your sources (CD/DVD, etc.), you will likely need to buy some adaptors to connect the PC's outputs to the receiver's inputs - same deal as with the subwoofer.


One of the bitg gotchas is that no equipment will sound the same in your home as it does in the store. For this reason, it's strongly recommended that you buy from vendors who will allow you to return the gear in a reasonable amount of time (usually 30 days) on a satisfaction basis. This is how you avoid getting stuck with gear that may not be the best for your ears in your house on your budget.


Given that it looks like you'll be working on an entry-level budget, this is actually good news for you. Entry-level gear has come a long way in the last few years, and you can get pretty darn good performance for short dollars. The key is to not let the dollars burn a hole in your pocket and have the patience to audition lots of gear before buying.


Assuming your sub is powered, just about any receiver will drive it. Specifically, you want to be sure the receiver has a mono pre-amp out, sometimes labeled 'sub out'. You may need to use an adaptor as the Logitech likely has a 1/8" plug and your new receiver will have an RCA plug for the sub-out. These adaptors are dirt-cheap at Radio Shack (and elsewhere).


Any receiver will drive home speakers, so you don't need anything special there. As speakers tend to sound very, very different from model to model (even within the same brand/line), you'll want to spend much, much more time choosing the speakers than the receiver. Choose the receiver based on features and reviews. Choose the speakers based on how they sound connected to the receiver you plan to buy.


Good luck, and have fun!


-Tweak
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, that made a lot of sense. And after looking at the specs for the Subwoofer, I realized that you were right about needing an RCA to 1/8" plug to drive the Sub. But the subwoofer volume is handled by a single controller which also handles the speaker volume. I had problems with my Telex system, with something frying and not being able to power up either Sub or speakers, even though electrically it seemed quite fine. I don't want the same problem though I trust Logitech have better tech support. I just don't want to have to call them and explain what it was I was doing that is outside of their support boundary.


I'd prefer to get rid of the logitech system completely and start over with a new HT setup, but I don't want to blow too much of a whole in my pocket right now considering I'm still in school. I'm following this purely as a hobby, and as good as I've gotten with tweaking my PC, I'd love to figure this out as well. Entry level sounds good enough for me. I'm doing some research about speakers and receivers, and hopefully should be able to make some decisions. As you said, I'm looking at entry level and hopefully at the right price I should able to start investing in the right equipment. I don't want an HTIB, which is why I'd like to be sure that what I'm buying is well worth it. I don't consider myself an audiophile, but I hate buying something without knowing exactly what its good for either.


Any other advice would be great. The advice so far has been great :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Here you go:


If you have the budget for floorstanders, you may be able to find a pair that eliminate the need for the subwoofer. That way, your sub will be safe, and getting the bass to sound right will be a bit easier as you will have less potential phase issues (phase issues can occur when you have the same frequency coming out of multiple speakers at the same time, but those frequencies are reaching your ears at different times).


Thinking even more about this, whatever speakers you buy will very likely go much louder when driven by a receiver than the PC subwoofer is able to go, so the PC subwoofer would likely be useless at higher volumes in the new system any way. I would leave the sub out of the equation and find some floorstanders that have decent bass.


Also, the PC sub may depend on the PC speakers being connected in order to operate safely. If you still want to use the PC sub in the new system, I'd call Logitech and make sure it's safe for the sub.


-Tweak
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
294 Posts
To use your PC as a component, check out the Home Theater PC section of this forum, and questions regarding the use of an HTPC will be answered there. As far as connectors, that's determined by your soundcard. If you have your computer close to you new receiver, the you really can't beat the Chaintech AV710 for a soundcard. It is probably about $10 now, and have optical spdif out. Hook up a toslink cable between the two and you're laughing.


A word of caution, since you say your budget is tight. This hobby can be addictive!! Speakers are really the biggest part of the equation, however remember that your room will contribute a hell of a lot as well. Check out some posts on acoustically treatment, or check out the acoustics primer on Ethan Winer's website. http://www.ethanwiner.com/acoustics.html Proper room treatment will make "OK" speakers sound much much better, and can usually be done on quite a limited budget, as long as you don't mind doing a little work.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top