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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings Everyone!


I'm new to this and so incredibly grateful that I stumbled upon this site. The passion and generosity of forum members is truly impressive! Several days ago, MM asked for words of encouragement, please accept my honest gratitude. MM and all of the gurus here provide a fantastic public service for people like me who like theater, like to tinker, and like to hold on to as much of our $$ as possible



I've leaned much already via countless hours of reading, have already made several purchases and am about ready to roll, but I wanted to check my fact before starting:

Background

Location: Utah (hot and dry right now, intend to spray outside)

Room: 16' L and 10' W

Pain: Dark Gray Walls, Lighter Gray ceiling (WAF) --both flat

Light Control: good to excellent

Viewing: 90% movies (DVDs) with 10% games


PJ: Epson 8350

Mounting Distance: Currently 14.5'
Question: This requires some lateral correction, so I've been considering buying a ceiling mount and am willing to do so. This would allow me to mount in the center of the screen and move closer for the extra FLs. Recommended?


Screen Size: The viewing wall has a door in one corner, which means that my absolute maximum screen size is 100" (16X9), obviously going with a 98" screen is not a big deal to get increases substrate options.

Project Info

- Already purchased the inexpensive paint gun recommended here

- Ready order black velvet for the frame (Wife has even agreed to the the wrappin')
Question: Is there a need to make sure that the longer (width) sections are wrapped with a single piece?


Planning to Purchase the following at Home Depot later this week:

- TWH cut to 85"
Questions: Does this sound like a good choice give my size limitations? Does this require priming? Does it need to be mounted onto another medium or will it maintain its shape?

- 6' 1X3 poplar for creating frame mounting blocks

- 8' Poplar 2X4 for French Cleat Mounts
Question": Is this the right size? I seem to remember someone suggesting another alternative, but I couldn't find the thread again.

- 3/4" MDF Edging for the Frame


I've already got most of the other tools and materials that I might need (I think).


Now, the obligatory newbie question:


What color? I plan to spray this coming weekend, so I need to order quickly if outsourcing will be necessary.

FYI - We've got an Hobby Lobby and Michael's if this helps, otherwise I have note on internet sources for most of the brews that you all have cooked up!


Thanks in advance for any advice or input that you all can provide. I've been projecting onto a free 74" screen that a buddy gave me (he got it free with an old projector), so I'm looking forward to "stepping up".


Cheers!
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StreamLover  /t/1417325/ready-to-roll-just-checkin-to-make-sure-that-i-got-it-right#post_22163268


Greetings Everyone!

I'm new to this and so incredibly grateful that I stumbled upon this site. The passion and generosity of forum members is truly impressive! Several days ago, MM asked for words of encouragement, please accept my honest gratitude. MM and all of the gurus here provide a fantastic public service for people like me who like theater, like to tinker, and like to hold on to as much of our $$ as possible


I've leaned much already via countless hours of reading, have already made several purchases and am about ready to roll, but I wanted to check my fact before starting:

Welcome to AVS's DIY Screen Forum!


Thanks for the Plug...
...but what I really asked for was for those who have done projects to come back and encourage others. It all about the end results...I just try to keep the fuses lit under all ya all.

Quote:
Background

Location: Utah (hot and dry right now, intend to spray outside)

No Gnats? Well, under direct Sunlight and hot, dry temps, Duster Coats will dry in 20 minutes to touch, and be repaint-able in 30-40 minutes. But don't whine to me if a lizard crawls across you screen.

Quote:
Room: 16' L and 10' W

Pain: Dark Gray Walls, Lighter Gray ceiling (WAF) --both flat

Light Control: good to excellent

Viewing: 90% movies (DVDs) with 10% games

PJ: Epson 8350

Mounting Distance: Currently 14.5'
Question: This requires some lateral correction, so I've been considering buying a ceiling mount and am willing to do so. This would allow me to mount in the center of the screen and move closer for the extra FLs. Recommended?

Without reservation, absolutely. To within 10% of your minimum available Throw Distance for the desired Screen size below


Screen Size: The viewing wall has a door in one corner, which means that my absolute maximum screen size is 100" (16X9), obviously going with a 98" screen is not a big deal to get increases substrate options.[/quote]


You got it easy!
Quote:
Project Info

- Already purchased the inexpensive paint gun recommended here

- Ready order black velvet for the frame (Wife has even agreed to the the wrappin')
http://www.syfabrics.com/View.aspx/Plush-Triple-Velvet/Black-Plush-Triple-Velvet/681/264
Quote:
Question: Is there a need to make sure that the longer (width) sections are wrapped with a single piece?

Yep. You'll need 3 yards. It's cheap enough.....and you'll get "ripped" doing it. Really. And that's a good thing in this instance.

Quote:
Planning to Purchase the following at Home Depot later this week:

- TWH cut to 85"
Questions: Does this sound like a good choice give my size limitations? Does this require priming? Does it need to be mounted onto another medium or will it maintain its shape?

- 6' 1X3 poplar for creating frame mounting blocks

- 8' Poplar 2X4 for French Cleat Mounts
Question": Is this the right size? I seem to remember someone suggesting another alternative, but I couldn't find the thread again.

- 3/4" MDF Edging for the Frame

Lots to possibly change.


Trim is 1/2" x 3.25" MDF Base Board (Primed)


Can you mount the TWH directly to the wall using a Flexible Adhesive? This would be your best option...more below.


If your needing a easily removable Frame, then you need 1" x 6" Poplar. 3" of wood to support the TWH around it's perimeter, and the remaining 2.5" of wood for a Nail backing for the Trim.


By ripping one edge of the Top Frame, and the leading edge of a single piece of 6' x 1' x 3" you can create an integrated French Cleat that will make the Screen be a lot less "High Profile" off the wall (2.5" vs 5/8")
Quote:
I've already got most of the other tools and materials that I might need (I think).


Now, the obligatory newbie question:


What color? I plan to spray this coming weekend, so I need to order quickly if outsourcing will be necessary.

FYI - We've got an Hobby Lobby and Michael's if this helps, otherwise I have note on internet sources for most of the brews that you all have cooked up!

Thanks in advance for any advice or input that you all can provide. I've been projecting onto a free 74" screen that a buddy gave me (he got it free with an old projector), so I'm looking forward to "stepping up".

Cheers!

For the best results without going into anything too dark, I'd suggest RS-MaxxMudd Standard. That's a quick, easily assembled Brew, and will allow "Low Lamp" running on that smallish screen, enhancing Black levels while doing so.


Get'er Dun....but always ask a question first before moving ahead. Corrections as to materials and technique are somewhat easier to answer (...or correct...) before the fact.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Many, Many thanks MMan!


I had a l---o----n---g day at the office, but am back on it. I'm sourcing the ingredients for the RS-MM-Std, ordering the velvet, ordering a PJ calibraton Blu-ray (Disney version, at least at first), and trying to track down a good PJ mount tonight. My hope is to get much of this done this weekend. I've even taken Friday off to give myself an extra day.


Even the gnats stay inside when it is this hot! Nonetheless, I'll make sure the screen is somewhat protected while it's drying. I've got several cats to keep the lizards at bay.


Seriously, I love how you don't take this too seriously. This is supposed to be fun right?


I think I need to make the screen removable for several reasons:

1) We've nicknamed our beautiful children "Dennis and the Diva" and I'm a little concerned about "Dennis" trying to "help me" make my screen a little better


2) You folks seem to always be improving screen treatments and PJs seem to change as well, so I figure a removable screen will be easier to upgrade should this bug strike

3) If there is something that we want to teak, based on our personal preferences, then we can easily repaint. Not that I'm guessing that this will be the case, but hey I'm a scientist and not at all opposed to a little experimentation if needed

3) Most importantly, my fantastic and beautiful wife has a "hang up" up permanently hanging up our screen



Anyhow...I love your mounting idea! It took me a minute to understand what you were thinking, but this is MUCH more elegant than what I had envisioned. Two birds, one stone. Love it!


Looking forward to getting ripped while wrapping the frame. Given the season, I'm thinking mojitos as opposed to single malt, but I'm open to suggestions on this as well



I'm so glad I went the PJ route as opposed to a flat screen, this is so much more fun. I love cooking and always say that the most important ingredient is love. It is pretty cool to have a personal involvement in my AV experience as well!


Anyhow, thanks again. I'll be sure to keep posting as the project commences.


Ciao, for now.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I just realized that I probably should have titled my first post "ready to spray", especially given my intent. My bad.


Oh, and thanks for the warm welcome!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by StreamLover  /t/1417325/ready-to-roll-just-checkin-to-make-sure-that-i-got-it-right#post_22166861


I just realized that I probably should have titled my first post "ready to spray", especially given my intent. My bad.

Oh, and thanks for the warm welcome!

Your welcome.


Get a Chief RPA 168 Dedicated Mount w/Peerless Acc570 Ceiling Plate. Connect the two with a 1.5" Threaded Pipe ...called a Nipple if under 6"... and the Wires will all run hidden inside the Pipe.


Call Projector People...ask for Ext. 2002. Accept no other Rep as he knows exactly what you need for the 8350. Just tell him I sent you AND I SAID TO "BEST PRICE" ya!.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You caught me just in time. Lucky for the projector people folks that I'm dealing with professional crises
Lucky for myself that I didn't rely on my initial Google search. Subsequent reviews and research post your comment, has convinced me that that your advise is sound.


Thanks dude, you rock!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well, my spraying was delayed until this Thursday due to my failure to plan ahead with regard to the Rustoleum paint.



I've got the rest of the gear though, so today I'm going to make the screen backing that will serve as a mounting surface for my frame and as a french cleat for mounting.


This will allow me to put the screen up while I'm mounting my new Chief ceiling mount. This was I can make sure that I've got everything working before I actually spray. Plus, I can put up a temporary mounting cleat on my paper covered garage wall to make for a convenient way to hold the screen at a comfortable height when I spray later this week.


I'll be sure to take some photos as I go, which I'll post here as I go.


Thanks again!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Oh, I forgot to mention that I'll mount the backing frame to the Thrifty White Hardboard (TWH) using wood glue, clamps, and several screws (through countersunk pre-drilled holes) for good measure.


I still haven't completely figured out how I'm going to hold the ceiling mount up, but I figure that I can figure this out once I determine, with certainty, what my mounting constraints are.


As I recall there is no need prime the TWH, however is there anything to be gained by doing this? I do, after all, have a little extra time.
 

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DIY Granddad (w/help)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StreamLover  /t/1417325/ready-to-roll-just-checkin-to-make-sure-that-i-got-it-right#post_22180599


Oh, I forgot to mention that I'll mount the backing frame to the Thrifty White Hardboard (TWH) using wood glue, clamps, and several screws (through countersunk pre-drilled holes) for good measure.

I still haven't completely figured out how I'm going to hold the ceiling mount up, but I figure that I can figure this out once I determine, with certainty, what my mounting constraints are.

Post here or send me a PM with your details and limitations. I might be able to suggest a viable course of action as I always strive to make the mounting option look as good as possible user all circumstances, and I've encountered a LOT of circumstances.
Quote:
As I recall there is no need prime the TWH, however is there anything to be gained by doing this? I do, after all, have a little extra time.

It can only help...if it's applied correctly and sanded lightly afteward to a ultra smooth state. Use Glidden "Gripper Primer".
 

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Discussion Starter #10
One tiny mistake...


Thanks again. I "Did it Myself" and followed the advise that you've provided to myself and others.


The project went pretty well. I've been keeping careful notes. taking pictures, etc. and will compile them in another thread once I get home this evening. My hope is to repay you for your kindness, in some small way, by creating a "build a vinyl panel screen for dummies" thread with details. While everyone's circumstances are unique, my notes may help by providing the fresh eye perspective of a newbie.


Overall, the frame came out swimmingly, it is square and rock-solid in construction. The French Cleat look like they'll work great too.


My only mistake was not using some cardboard to protect the screen from the clamps. The really stupid thing was that this was in my plans (I'm ADD and big maker-o-lists), but I took a short cut because the clamps I was using have rubber protectors and I assumed that this would be enough. In most cases this was true, but in several places the vinyl "squished" into "craters" where the clamp was in contact with the screen.



At first glance, it looks like the surface is still "true" and that I can simply sand these down and prime, but it may involve some Spackle work. Is this something you've encountered before? If so, any "fix it" advise?
 

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Post a picture (Macro) of the offensive areas.


Using a thick material Like Artist Gesso that you have mixed in your screen paint with can be used to "fill what is a slight depression, then you simply roll / spray over the area to completely blend it in. Always make the "repair" be mixed so as to be ever so slightly lighter than the actual Screen color, lest you wind up with a darker area instead of a blended colorization.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Here is a photo of the mistake. The more I look at it, the more I'm convinced that it is a problem of the surrounding area being pushed up, as opposed to the underlying substrate being pressed in.
What happen with agressive clamping.JPG 1702k .JPG file
 

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Thanks for the input. I guess there is no harm in trying to fix it. Can't hurt, might help. So I'm thinking of removing the pressed up portions with a razor blade, carefully filling in any indentations, then priming the entire screen for uniform color. One thought that I've had is that if the indentations are not too deep, i could roll on "Blank it" primer from Porter paints. I'm not sure if you have experience with this paint, but it is REALLY thick stuff. Painters use it to get top grade wall finishes because it fills in minor imperfections, especially with a quick sand after applications (restoration of old house speaking). I think I'll try this in the am, them report back on the efficacy of the...well...ficacy



Worse case scenario, I guess I could remove the sheet, sand off the residual glue, then cover the frame with a new sheet. Not a big deal...a couple of hours of work and $20...


Bummer, but hey I'll get to try out all of my woulda', shouldas from my first attempt



Which leads me to my next observation...My substrate may not be what I thought it was



I'll post the Home Depot link in the screen construction thread that I started.


Cool snapping turtle pic BTW.


On my way to watch fireworks now with the kids...I know...small town and it turns out that it is much cheaper to higher folks the day before...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Sanded, primed, sanded, primed...good news, it worked!



I'd post a picture, but...well...you can't tell it was ever there so there isn't much to see.


I'm actually really glad I went through the process because it forced me to focus, in great detail, on the screen surface. One thing I've learned from every painting job--from homes to cars--is the final result only looks as good as your prep.


Speaking of painting cars...most here use wet sanding blocks, but if I already have quality wet sand paper is there any reason this won't work? It's now sanded down with 220, but I have 400 & 600 wet sand paper that I could use if I wanted to go further.
 

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That all sounds good.


BTW, even though we prescribe the use of Sanding Sponges, seldom are they ever "wet'ted", but rather used dry and with an extremely light touch. The best sponge to use is found in the Drywall Supply section at Home Depot as a "Fine Grit LARGE (1" x 3" x 8") Sanding Sponge.


If you have sanded the surface down using 220, your smoother that is really required. If all the painting goes as hoped, at best you might wind up very lightly sanding the 3rd Duster coat prior to adding the final coat. Using the soft sanding sponge just makes the job easier and go more quickly, but if your used to using 220 Grit Sand Paper correctly, then I'm sure you can go on ahead with what your comfortable with.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Painting today! Quick question...


As you can see from the attached macro, I think I did a pretty good job getting the board prepared. You can see small pores--the nature of primer (I think)--the board is otherwise pretty smooth.



As soon as the UPS guy gets here, I'm going to start spraying. So If I'm putting on dusters every 45-60 minutes (we're at about 80-85 degrees and 30% humidity), what do I need to do with the gun between coats? How full should I fill the reservoir in the HPLV gun (how often does the pint need to be mixed between coats)?


I'll keep looking in the forum, but I haven't seen these questions addressed.


Thanks. I sure hope this works.


 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by StreamLover  /t/1417325/ready-to-roll-just-checkin-to-make-sure-that-i-got-it-right#post_22195331


Painting today! Quick question...

As you can see from the attached macro, I think I did a pretty good job getting the board prepared. You can see small pores--the nature of primer (I think)--the board is otherwise pretty smooth.


As soon as the UPS guy gets here, I'm going to start spraying. So If I'm putting on dusters every 45-60 minutes (we're at about 80-85 degrees and 30% humidity), what do I need to do with the gun between coats? How full should I fill the reservoir in the HPLV gun (how often does the pint need to be mixed between coats)?

I'll keep looking in the forum, but I haven't seen these questions addressed.

Thanks. I sure hope this works.


Fill the Cup up at least to within 1" from the start of the neck.

The Squirrel Cage Mixer separates to provide a "Quart Sized" mixer, and if the paint has already been strained, then just give it a little slow speed mixing before each coat.

As for the Gun itself, you can leave it alone between coats if you absolutely feel the need to, but be advised that cleaning it after each coating is only a 5 minute job at most and keeps things working perfect. Make sure everything is tightened down securely. Run the Gun at full output. Are you down with what to look for to confirm how thin the paint needs to be ( Sock Filter "flow through" test? )


More Tips for you.....


Always strain paint before it's added to, or at the same time it's added to the Cup.

Maintain the Duster technique (speed and distance) and never....NEVER slow down or stop in the middle of a row.
DO NOT attempt to go back to fill in any weaker areas you might see. Wait until the next coat.

Be very careful not to step on the Air Hose, lest the Gun cough up some globules of paint. If that does happen, simply take a dry cotton cloth and dab away the splotch. I always drape the Hose across my back and hold the Hose extended outward with my free hand.

Overlap at least 60% (70% is best) That means start and finish each coat at least 60% off (above & below) the actual Screen surface.

Run out (off) the edges at each side at least 4" before dropping your 30-40% and heading back....while keeping the trigger engaged.


If you run into anything too daunting or crazy, look to your PM for my number, and DO NOT hesitate to call for real time advice. I ate the Turtle.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!


It all went swimmingly. I erred on the side of going too light with my spraying, while still trying to make sure I was spraying evenly, with proper overlap. Thisvmeant that I needed over 12 coats before getting good coverage, but with only 30 minutes between coats this wasn't a big deal.


Similarly, I erred on the paint being thin, although based on the video I think I got this about right on my third attempt.


I had a compilation of advise from my weeks of reading here.


Anyhow, bottom line...I brought it in last night and even with it leaning against the wall the picture was absolutely stunning! We had some house guests and everyone was blown away.
. Once I got the hang of things, this was quite fun!


Anyhow, we're hosting a big party tonight, so my day will be spent with another hobby--cooking--so I won't be able to complete the project (mounting, frame wrapping') until tomorrow.


I promise to post more details later. I'll hold off on screen shots until I calibrate after the paint has about a week to cure.


Thanks again! I could not be happier with how it turned out!
 
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