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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,


I was considering possibly moving my Integra DTR 40.2 for an audio setup in the downstairs living room and "upgrading" to a newer model for the main media room. My media room is 17'x14' and I sit approx. 11ft from my mains and 9ft from the center speaker in a 5.1 setup consisting of PSB Image T6s, an Image C5 center, and Image B5 rear surrounds. I have no plans to ever go to a 7.1 setup or add a second sub. My ideal range is around 1k for a receiver.


Anthem MRX 310/510: Got a chance to audition this setup at a local audio store. I brought a demo recording with me and listened to each one. The 310 seemed to perform quite well, but the 510 had a more defined mid-range at much higher volumes (too high for me personally) on the same speakers. Both amps were not calibrated in the room as they often switch between multiple speakers.


Pros: I'm sure the 310 has enough power for my room size. I am very fascinated by the ARC speaker calibration which would give me lots of options. I currently use the Audyssey MultiEq on my Integra and found that it helped a lot with the sound quality in my room, which has hardwood floors and 8' ceiling that slopes inwards with the roof-line. Perhaps later, I could add a separate power amp for more "juice" for the 310. Not sure if the 510 is really worth stretching my budget for.


Cons: ARC software is PC dependent. Not sure if they would support newer OSs that come out in the future if I wanted to keep my MRX 310 for up to 10 years or so.


NAD T758: Haven't heard this receiver yet but a dealer that I have known since my early audio days really likes the NAD sound quality a lot. I've heard similar NAD receivers and I do like their smooth sound quality. The dealer is now a 2 hour drive away. Very little information or reviews on forums or websites though.


Pros: Very simple interface and easy to configure. Seems to pack a good power punch for 2 channel (majority of my listening) and seems to have more than enough for a 5 speaker setup. Modular construction.


Cons: Very basic Audyssey setup (if it even works based on some reviews I've read) and limited EQ options. I'm ok with manual setups anyways as I have done that many times before.


Thanks in advance for any opinions or advice!
 

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Can you try the Anthem in your home? If so try that first. Dealers only with that brand. The NAD T758 is available from Crutchfield. You can try it by ordering from them. Excellent vendor with a good return policy. Only way to make a good choice. Either are excellent choices IMO.
 

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I would go with Anthem. ARC, Dolby Volume, Anthem's participation on forums, excellent customer service are some of the reasons I went with the Anthem myself. ARC is PC dependent, but that's also it's strength as it calculates very quickly and you don't have to re-measure unless you change equipment; you can always re-upload your EQ file to the receiver. ARC will also stop during a measurement if it detects unusual sound like a phone ringing. This is great because I can't tell you how many times I've had to start over because of something I didn't anticipate while taking measurements using Audyssey and other RC systems.
 

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Fyi, the NAD T758 can have the AM 200 mdc card fitted which gives it MultiEQ XT, dynamic eq/volume. In aus this brings the price of the T758 up to about the same as the Anthem mrx-510.


I'm very interested in your observations as I'm considering these 2 along with the Denon x4000, but I'm yet to have a listen.


Ben
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the advice. I have been considering Crutchfield as well for the NAD receiver. I picked up the C5 and B5 speakers from them. Very fast, helpful, and friendly. I would hate having to buy it and then send it back if I am not impressed with the product, but it is the only way to really test it out. The same goes with the Anthem. I would have to buy it and they would allow me to use their demo model. If I liked it, I could exchange it back for a brand new model.


I read up on the NAD T758 a few weeks ago regarding the updated card with the higher version of Audyssey. I also talked with the NAD tech support regarding updating the firmware on the unit if one were necessary. My Integra has a really simple via the internet interface to update. The NAD has an RS-232 port in the back. They also recommended bringing it in for service if a firmware update is needed, but I'm sure it isn't too terrible for a tech savy person to update. With how basic the receiver's options are, I would hope it wouldn't need an update at all.


The Anthem unit seemed to have a better approach, but still not ideal (in my opinion) via USB with firmware. Hopefully, they will eventually move to a network firmware update model in the future though. I think the ARC calibration would make my wife happy as it drove her crazy with me spending time calibrating my Integra and having to redo it due to random noises such as a jet flying overhead (I live near an airport, but it is not very busy).


It will probably be a few weeks until I have time to order a receiver and set one up for a solid listen. I'd like to give the NAD a try at home first.
 

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I, too, have been considering changing out my Denon X1000 for a NAD or Anthem. I live in an apartment so Ive been doing a bit of reading on the NAD T748v2 as it provides more than enough power for my Definitive PM1000/PC2000 setup. In my opinion my Denon is just not quite makin my Definitives "shine" so to speak. I've heard that NAD sound is in a league of its own. If i do decide to bite the bullet & go for the NAD i'll definitely pick it up from Crutchfield as their policy is outstanding (60 day trial in home). The only disconcerting comments i read on a few different user boards was that NAD tech support leaves much to be desired....but, then again, with Crutchfield's stellar support i don't think i'd have to worry about anything too much....


Well just my 2 cents guys.....

Carmine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just ordered the NAD T758. I should have my initial opinion sometime after the weekend. I'll see what my wife thinks about it as well as I would consider her the most unbiased reviewer on receivers (they all look like boxes to her anyways). I also contacted Anthem regarding questions concerning the MRX 310/510 series. They seemed to recommend the 510. I've always been an Integra/Onkyo person since my teenage years, so I will compare the NAD to the Integra initially. I have yet to try the Anthem at home, but I will see how the NAD works out first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I hooked up the NAD T758 today. Presently, I have only auditioned the NAD T758 at home and listened to the MRX310 & MRX510 at a dealer on some midrange Klipsch speakers (can’t remember the model # of the speakers).

First Impressions:

Out of the box, you can definitely tell there is a lot of weight towards the power supply portion of the receiver. I definitely don't judge a receiver by weight, but it seems well built with a clean & understated look. It offers more than enough inputs for what I have connected to it (PS3 & a PC) and would suit the needs of a typical home theater. If you have multiple gaming systems or digital devices, the 4 HDMI inputs may not be enough for you. I'm not really a fan of the vertical arrangement of the HDMI inputs either, but I'm guessing that is due to the modular design setup.

Initial Setup:

Setup took about 30 minutes for me. After plugging in my 5 speakers and subwoofer, I decided to try the basic Audyssey interface out to see how well it would configure my system. As I mentioned before, I am using the PSB Image T6 for mains, Image C5 center, and Image B5 for surrounds. I also am using a Sunfire Super Junior subwoofer. Audyssey worked, for the most part, setting levels and distances. The anomalies I noticed were that it set the center channel distance to 1ft and the subwoofer to 28ft. I expected the subwoofer distance to be off but I was surprised by the erroneous center channel measurement. My Integra DTR 40.2 unit never ran into an issue with the center channel and always relayed an accurate 9ft distance. I decided to run it again and this time it set it to a distance of 0ft. Evidently, I have the center channel on my lap when watching movies.... I performed a manual override on the center & sub settings though.

Performance:

Overall, performance was very good. Judging sound quality is very subjective, but I will do my best to describe my experience in this area. Initially, I noticed a decrease in bass as compared to my Integra unit, but I went back to the setup and noticed my PSB T6 speakers were set to large. I set them to small and got more performance out of my subwoofer afterwards. With its default EQ set (treble & bass set to 0), the NAD is noticeably warmer than the Integra 40.2 that I've had for a few years. The Integra would almost make my ears bleed with its default tone settings and Audyssey MultEQ helped to make it more enjoyable. I bumped the treble down on the NAD to -4dB as the receiver was a bit livelier in my room than what I'd like.

Music performance was very good with a well-defined soundstage and it easily handled my most dynamic recordings via my PC. I didn't notice any gaps between songs and it "locked on" much faster than my Integra when starting a song. I felt it had tighter, more defined bass than my Integra. As far as movies go, it seemed to be more reserved in performance, but the vocals seemed clear and crisp with good detail. I also felt that I had a little better immersion through the rear speakers with the NAD T758.

Video performance was very good via HDMI as I prefer little to no video processing anyways. I game on my PC and my Integra would sometimes get in the way with older games with lower resolutions.

My Verdict:

The NAD T758 is a very capable receiver that offers good performance, but I wasn't really "wowed" by it. I don’t think it would be worth moving my Integra “flagship” receiver over to the downstairs room for this NAD unit. I'm glad I got the chance to try it out, but I now realize that I would like more options on controlling the sound and for addressing my room acoustics. If you are a person that favors simplicity, this is the type of receiver for you. I prefer just a few more "bells & whistles" than what this receiver has to offer.

Wife's Verdict:

She didn't really recognize a great difference either. Regarding the appearance of the receiver, it still looks like a box to her with a different color volume knob.


Hope this helps!
 

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Thanks for your impression of the NAD. It's one on the AVRs I would consider getting if mine ever dies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Picked up the MRX 510 by Anthem last weekend and here are my thoughts:

First Impressions:

Build quality is very good with an understated look. I like the overall looks of this receiver a little better than the NAD. It has more than enough HDMI inputs for my devices & the one in the front is especially convenient.

Initial Setup:

Setup was about the same compared to the NAD unit. I manually set speaker levels & distances. I liked the menu much better on the Anthem than the NAD, but overall they were both fine for my tastes. No glitches or errors noted during the manual setup.

Performance:

I'm going with the usual disclaimer that sound is subjective. Out of the box with no ARC correction, I noticed the sound was very crisp & detailed. Sound quality was very similar to the NAD unit. It was just a bit more "laid back" when compared to the NAD, but I heard details in certain music recordings that I have not heard before. The bass out of my subwoofer was about the same among all three receivers (my existing Integra, the NAD T758, & now the Anthem MRX 510).

After playing music & movies without ARC correction, I decided to try out the ARC software on my HTPC. Software installation was easy on Windows 8.1. I ran into a snag running the program at first. DO NOT try to use a PC connected directly to the receiver via HDMI. It will freeze up your PC & the receiver. I powered off the router and the receiver exited out of the ARC setup and the PC recovered as well. As a workaround, I bypassed the receiver and connected the HDMI cable directly to my TV. The ARC software ran just fine afterwards and I was done in about 15 minutes. According to Anthem, it is intended to be used with a laptop.

The sound quality after ARC was more noticeable on movies. For movies, it really tamed the "bass bloat" on my subwoofer and the center channel had much more clarity & less brightness. This receiver is used in a media room, so adding bass traps and other expensive room treatments is not exactly "wife friendly" in my opinion. For music via my PC, my bass basically disappeared with ARC so I will need to try a different profile configuration for that. There is also no reason to install a separate amplifier for my room size as this unit offers plenty of volume & power that I need. I guess a separate amp could possibly add more LED lights in my room though….. :)

My Verdict:

I decided to purchase the MRX 510 over the 310. I will possibly add a zone 2 in the future and I have that flexibility with the Anthem 510 unit. I like the ARC software and having more options to tweak & configure the sound to my liking is a plus, which was the big selling point for me. I looked into upgrading the NAD T758 with the AM200 module with Audyssey MultEQ XT and I didn’t see any value in going that route. $600 + any possible dealer installation fees did not seem like a good deal to me. I would get a better deal going with a larger volume manufacturer to get equivalent features and possibly the better Audyssey MultEQ XT32 variant. The MRX 510 is the most expensive receiver that I have ever purchased and the first non Onkyo or Integra receiver as well. I had honestly not heard of Anthem until about a year ago. The 510 would be the top limit on what I would spend on a receiver, but it is one of the best sounding receivers that I have owned due, in part, to the ARC software. I will be jumping over to the Anthem owners thread to ask more experienced users about the ARC software and other tweaking options.

I hope this helps anyone out there looking for a receiver!
 

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I have been trying to decide on the NAD T758 and the Anthem MRX-310 as well! My problem is, I own a NAD T743 and I run an Adcom GFA-555 external amp. The external amp is very neutral, what goes in, the same sound goes out. I had an expensive Onkyo with the Adcom and the Onkyo sounded TERRIBLE. The NAD is the best receiver I've ever heard in my life when you hit the sweet sound spot on the volume. But that was before Audyssey, my NAD just had the good old bass and treble controls. I am confused by Audyssey and I only care about 2 channel audio for music anyways and Audyssey is for movies. But a couple weeks ago my NAD got hit by lightning. Now the NAD receivers have Audyssey so I'm not sure I'll get that wonderful sweet spot. My external amp got fried as well but I plan to replace with the same. The Anthem MRX-310 would be all I need since I have the external amp and don't care about surround sound. I do like that it has more HDMI inputs. I am confused by the ARC microphone. I thought it plugged into the back of the receiver's cat5 jack and the results showed up on TV and then you saved them. If not, what is the cat 5 jack for? I do have a laptop running Windows 7, I hate Windows 8.1. Will Arc work on Windows 7? And I planned to stay with windows 7 as long as I can and when this laptop dies, I want to get a MacBook Pro which I've been told ARC doesn't work on. This is such a hard decision! But thank you for your thread. Glad you didn't pick out the Denon!! Yuck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Hi Ted,


Overall, both receivers are pretty good. I actually tested out the NAD T758 a little longer to see how it performed:

Positives:

Very simple and very basic interface. Sound quality is very good even with the basic setup (speaker levels, crossover, distance). You get the basic treble & bass controls. It should drive any average efficiency speakers well (I'm using PSB Image T6 towers, C5 center, and B5 surrounds for 5.1). The receiver runs cool and is very quiet. It held its own when playing anything I threw at it. If you like simple and no frills, this is a model to look in to.

NAD is offering a discount on the future 4K HDMI board upgrade when purchasing the NAD T758. Link:

http://hometheaterreview.com/nad-announces-4k-ready-mdc-program/

Cons:

The Audyssey setup was buggy (just set it up manually). I had issues with HDMI drop outs with my PCs & my PS3 frequently. There was a firmware fix to resolve that problem when I contacted a local dealer. I had some HDMI scaling weirdness between a 720p LG TV and another PC with the NAD between the chain. I ended up bypassing the receiver and using the TV's optical out to fix the problem.

Anthem MRX 510

Positives:

The ARC software does work well and is the best of the bunch in my opinion, although I only EQ the lower frequencies (500Hz and lower). I found that the sound was harsh and my ears were hurting when I took the default 5kHz setting. No more "bass bloat." The Anthem official thread is very active with lots of people offering support. I use a very cheap AMD E series Windows PC to run ARC and it does fine. HDMI video handshaking has been flawless for me with my PCs. I really like the menu and customization options that the receiver provides. It has a much more "higher tech" feeling than the NAD with regards to the user interface.

Cons:

The fan noise is quite annoying on the Anthem when listening to anything particularly demanding. Be sure to give it good ventilation. An external amp would help in this case to take the load off the receiver and reduce heat output of the receiver. If you have a media rack in a separate closet or in another room, it wouldn't be a problem at all. If you find that you don't like the ARC software, I think there are more affordable receivers out there that would offer equivalent performance at a lower price.
 

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Hi Ted,


Overall, both receivers are pretty good. I actually tested out the NAD T758 a little longer to see how it performed:

Positives:

Very simple and very basic interface. Sound quality is very good even with the basic setup (speaker levels, crossover, distance). You get the basic treble & bass controls. It should drive any average efficiency speakers well (I'm using PSB Image T6 towers, C5 center, and B5 surrounds for 5.1). The receiver runs cool and is very quiet. It held its own when playing anything I threw at it. If you like simple and no frills, this is a model to look in to.

NAD is offering a discount on the future 4K HDMI board upgrade when purchasing the NAD T758. Link:

http://hometheaterreview.com/nad-announces-4k-ready-mdc-program/

Cons:

The Audyssey setup was buggy (just set it up manually). I had issues with HDMI drop outs with my PCs & my PS3 frequently. There was a firmware fix to resolve that problem when I contacted a local dealer. I had some HDMI scaling weirdness between a 720p LG TV and another PC with the NAD between the chain. I ended up bypassing the receiver and using the TV's optical out to fix the problem.

Anthem MRX 510

Positives:

The ARC software does work well and is the best of the bunch in my opinion, although I only EQ the lower frequencies (500Hz and lower). I found that the sound was harsh and my ears were hurting when I took the default 5kHz setting. No more "bass bloat." The Anthem official thread is very active with lots of people offering support. I use a very cheap AMD E series Windows PC to run ARC and it does fine. HDMI video handshaking has been flawless for me with my PCs. I really like the menu and customization options that the receiver provides. It has a much more "higher tech" feeling than the NAD with regards to the user interface.

Cons:

The fan noise is quite annoying on the Anthem when listening to anything particularly demanding. Be sure to give it good ventilation. An external amp would help in this case to take the load off the receiver and reduce heat output of the receiver. If you have a media rack in a separate closet or in another room, it wouldn't be a problem at all. If you find that you don't like the ARC software, I think there are more affordable receivers out there that would offer equivalent performance at a lower price.
I also like the Anthem as well. I got one a month ago, my first non 2-channel system.

I set my maximum EQ frequency to 1500 Hz (with my speakers there was a bit of a hump around 1000 Hz I wanted to tame), seemed to sound more natural than default of 5000 Hz.

Also it might mean that the filter DSP can focus more on the lower frequency regions where it is a clear benefit vs a trade-off. At higher frqequencies I hear some deletion of 'naturalness', maybe phase or group delay alterations?

Also the Anthem-specific sound processing modes sound better (less processed) than Dolby or Neo:6.

Anyway from the reviews that I read, nearly everybody likes ARC's algorithm.
 

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I also like the Anthem as well. I got one a month ago, my first non 2-channel system.

I set my maximum EQ frequency to 1500 Hz (with my speakers there was a bit of a hump around 1000 Hz I wanted to tame), seemed to sound more natural than default of 5000 Hz.

Also it might mean that the filter DSP can focus more on the lower frequency regions where it is a clear benefit vs a trade-off. At higher frqequencies I hear some deletion of 'naturalness', maybe phase or group delay alterations?

Also the Anthem-specific sound processing modes sound better (less processed) than Dolby or Neo:6.

Anyway from the reviews that I read, nearly everybody likes ARC's algorithm.
Hi Guys. Since I didn't need the power since I have an external amp I went with a NAD T748V2. It worked good for setup and sound but it kept not wanting to turn on all the time and I had to manually unplug the receiver just to get it to power on again. So it was immediately swapped for another one. The second one, when I turned it on, emitted a MASSIVE amount of bass throughout all my powered subs and front speakers. It would not allow me to turn it down or turn it off until it said PWR PROTECTION - OVERLOAD. So that one was returned as well. I was sent a third NAD T748V2 and this one worked but then had the same problem of not turning on when I hit the power button so I was done with NAD, PLUS the 2nd one blew up my M&K powered subwoofer's driver during the power overload right out of the box and NAD said they didn't care.

So I went to the closest Anthem dealer and when auditioning the Anthem I noticed how dark the display was and I asked the guy if he could turn up the dimmer on the display and he did and they were already up yet dark. They had just the 310 and 510 on display, but the salesman hit his hand on the shelving unit and the both of the Anthem's display units started flickering. For one I was already half turned off before auditioning the Anthem because you have to use a computer as the screen to calibrate the mic and Anthem receivers which depend on a computer are not compatible with my MacBook Pro! I asked the salesman why they couldn't just use the main TV on HDMI for the display like most other receivers and he didn't know. He said they sound good but they have a high rate of return. I personally liked the looks of the Anthem but the display of the NAD was much better.

Finally the manager got involved and asked me to do a blind audition compared to the Anthem and NAD and I agreed and the third receiver was by far, not by a little but by far, the best sounding receiver for music and for theater. I care about music the most. I said, ok, what is it? He said "It's a Sony!" I started laughing but it was true. It was Sony's new Sony ES unit. It is fully 4K future proof with HDCP 2.2 built right in so that worked out well with my 4K TV at home. The model is STR-ZA3000ES. It offers HALF the features of their $500 receiver and they are asking a grand more for it. On the ES models, they are like NAD, less is better. The price for the Sony ES was $1699 but after research and shopping I got a brand new one for $775. Also, the Sony ES comes with a 5 year warranty which beats NAD and Anthem. It has it's own Mic Calibration which is speedy and awesome. So easy to use and the results are accurate unlike NAD. The menu is a joy to use. Where most receivers you are scared to enter the onscreen menu, this receiver you are eager to try new things. I had to get the 3000ES instead of the 2000 or 1000ES because the 3000ES is the only receiver that Sony even makes that has PRE OUT jacks for my external amp to use.

But in the end, the Sony ES STR-ZA3000ES compared to the Anthem or NAD wins in all categories that counted for me. It's looks are the best. Brushed aluminum with magnetic removable front panel to hide all the buttons and a very crisp display. 110WPC but that is rated conservatively unlike their regular models. It is a beast and the inside of it is artwork. The remote is cheap but so was the Anthem one and the NAD remote wasn't much better. But, the Sony's remote was the most useful and user friendly. And the Sony is the only model out of the three that is 4K future proof, not needing any expensive add on card like the NAD and the Anthem will never even be 4K compatible until they come up with a new model. So factoring all of that in, when you consider the price of an Anthem 510 and the fact that it needs a PC to calibrate and is already outdated with no 4K support, and no big warranty like Sony's 5 year warranty, all of the sudden the Sony ES, even at full price, is worth it. So if any of you are struggling like I was, give it a try through Crutchfield because you have nothing to lose. And then if you like it, shop around and get a good deal on one.
 

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Hi Guys. Since I didn't need the power since I have an external amp I went with a NAD T748V2. It worked good for setup and sound but it kept not wanting to turn on all the time and I had to manually unplug the receiver just to get it to power on again. So it was immediately swapped for another one. The second one, when I turned it on, emitted a MASSIVE amount of bass throughout all my powered subs and front speakers. It would not allow me to turn it down or turn it off until it said PWR PROTECTION - OVERLOAD. So that one was returned as well. I was sent a third NAD T748V2 and this one worked but then had the same problem of not turning on when I hit the power button so I was done with NAD, PLUS the 2nd one blew up my M&K powered subwoofer's driver during the power overload right out of the box and NAD said they didn't care.

So I went to the closest Anthem dealer and when auditioning the Anthem I noticed how dark the display was and I asked the guy if he could turn up the dimmer on the display and he did and they were already up yet dark. They had just the 310 and 510 on display, but the salesman hit his hand on the shelving unit and the both of the Anthem's display units started flickering. For one I was already half turned off before auditioning the Anthem because you have to use a computer as the screen to calibrate the mic and Anthem receivers which depend on a computer are not compatible with my MacBook Pro! I asked the salesman why they couldn't just use the main TV on HDMI for the display like most other receivers and he didn't know. He said they sound good but they have a high rate of return. I personally liked the looks of the Anthem but the display of the NAD was much better.

Finally the manager got involved and asked me to do a blind audition compared to the Anthem and NAD and I agreed and the third receiver was by far, not by a little but by far, the best sounding receiver for music and for theater. I care about music the most. I said, ok, what is it? He said "It's a Sony!" I started laughing but it was true. It was Sony's new Sony ES unit. It is fully 4K future proof with HDCP 2.2 built right in so that worked out well with my 4K TV at home. The model is STR-ZA3000ES. It offers HALF the features of their $500 receiver and they are asking a grand more for it. On the ES models, they are like NAD, less is better. The price for the Sony ES was $1699 but after research and shopping I got a brand new one for $775. Also, the Sony ES comes with a 5 year warranty which beats NAD and Anthem. It has it's own Mic Calibration which is speedy and awesome. So easy to use and the results are accurate unlike NAD. The menu is a joy to use. Where most receivers you are scared to enter the onscreen menu, this receiver you are eager to try new things. I had to get the 3000ES instead of the 2000 or 1000ES because the 3000ES is the only receiver that Sony even makes that has PRE OUT jacks for my external amp to use.

But in the end, the Sony ES STR-ZA3000ES compared to the Anthem or NAD wins in all categories that counted for me. It's looks are the best. Brushed aluminum with magnetic removable front panel to hide all the buttons and a very crisp display. 110WPC but that is rated conservatively unlike their regular models. It is a beast and the inside of it is artwork. The remote is cheap but so was the Anthem one and the NAD remote wasn't much better. But, the Sony's remote was the most useful and user friendly. And the Sony is the only model out of the three that is 4K future proof, not needing any expensive add on card like the NAD and the Anthem will never even be 4K compatible until they come up with a new model. So factoring all of that in, when you consider the price of an Anthem 510 and the fact that it needs a PC to calibrate and is already outdated with no 4K support, and no big warranty like Sony's 5 year warranty, all of the sudden the Sony ES, even at full price, is worth it. So if any of you are struggling like I was, give it a try through Crutchfield because you have nothing to lose. And then if you like it, shop around and get a good deal on one.
Does the Sony support an app to control it like a remote? Don't see any mention of one and in this day, almost all receivers have one. Like to turn on the receiver while upstairs with my iPad. Thanks
 
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