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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I've read the other suggested threads, and I'm still puzzled. I have an old Optimus STAV-3580 receiver and a pair of Infinity SM-150's. The receiver is rated at 8 ohms, and so, too (I believe) are the speakers. There are no other speakers connected. I am running 12-gauge speaker wire. For YEARS I have spent dozens of hours each week playing RockBand at a very high volume, and I've NEVER had a problem with my receiver crapping out. However, the last two times I've had folks over to play RB, the receiver displays "overload" and powers itself down whenever it wants to. We'll sometimes make it through a few songs before it happens, but it seems to just do it at random times. I tried using some different speaker wire, and it still happened. I even hooked up a different receiver (also 8 ohms), and it happened with the other receiver. So, because it's just started happening recently, and because changing the speaker wire didn't help, and because switching receivers didn't help, I'm left thinking that something is going on with my Infinity's. Are there any experts that could shed some light on this? It's driving me crazy. Thanks in advance.



And btw, it never happens when using only headphones. So what has suddenly happened between my speakers and the receiver?


Jeremy
 

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I would agree that one of the drivers in one of your infinity speakers might be bad. I had this same problem with a Klipsch speaker.


You might have to hook up one speaker at a time to find out. I found a problem with a speaker before by using test tones (which you can download and burn to a CD if needed.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If I had a bad driver, would the speakers work sometimes and crap out at other times? Is a bad driver something that can be fixed easily? Also, could you please elaborate on the test tones? Thanks a bunch for the reply.
 

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The idea of using test tones is that you might hear something obviously wrong with certain tones if the driver was damaged. It's just a shot in the dark. I had a brand new speaker and I was getting buzzing or something with a simple sine wave test tone they had to fix or replace that speaker. So it's possible you would find out something that way.


Simpler maybe, to just hook one speaker at a time and then turn it up to see if the receiver shuts down.


As for whether it would work sometimes and not other times, I don't know. In my case, with my Klipsch, it would only work at low volume. So I assume there was a short in the voice coil assembly, and raising volume caused sufficient current draw to shut down the receiver.
 

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Measure the speakers with an ohmmeter. 8 ohm speakers usually read in the mid six ohms. Compare speaker pairs with the meter. You may not catch the problem if its dynamic in the drivers but usually some difference will show up.


Use some care when doing your troubleshooting. A defective speaker can blow a channel in the amp, you replace the speaker, the blown amp channel busts the new speaker, and so on. Been there. Try to do as much speaker checking powered down as you can.
 

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Excellent advice. I always forget the idea of using a multi-meter for testing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks to everybody for the advice. I think I'm gonna haul these speakers down to a local shop and have 'em tested. I may just wind up having to euthanize these favorite speakers of mine. I hope not, but it's not looking good. Thanks again.
 
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