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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is a little background of what I wanted to do:


I installed 2 6 1/2" in wall speakers from Monoprice in my bedroom and the speakers wire is running from each speaker directly into my receiver. Now in the bathroom, I installed 1 6 1/2" 3 Way speaker and the speaker wire (2sets) is going from speaker to a volume control and then from the volume control to the same receiver as the bedroom. The receiver is a Sherwood RX-4105 2-Channel 100-Watt Stereo Receiver (Can control 2 sets of speakers).


Here is my problem,


I can put the bedroom speakers up to any volume without a problem. When I switch over to the bathroom side, at or around half volume the receiver shuts off (safety?).


The volume control is a Monoprice Speaker Volume Controller RMS 100W - Rotary Type
http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...seq=1&format=2


What did I do wrong or how can I fix this?
 

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I'd hazard a guess that running 2 pairs of wires to the same speaker in an attempt to make stereo into mono might be the problem. I'm no electronics whiz, but I haven't heard of anyone doing this before. It sounds like you are essentially bi-wiring or bi-amping a speaker that isn't designed for it, with a receiver that isn't designed for it. By putting both L and R amps' output into the same load instead of identical dual loads, you may be inadvertently reducing the impedance they are driving into and forcing the receiver to work much harder. This could put it into protect mode and cause it to shut down.


IMHO, you should be looking for something that will convert stereo to true mono and use that to feed your bathroom speaker.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rolls-Royce /forum/post/19640168


I'd hazard a guess that running 2 pairs of wires to the same speaker in an attempt to make stereo into mono might be the problem. I'm no electronics whiz, but I haven't heard of anyone doing this before. It sounds like you are essentially bi-wiring or bi-amping a speaker that isn't designed for it, with a receiver that isn't designed for it. By putting both L and R amps' output into the same load instead of identical dual loads, you may be inadvertently reducing the impedance they are driving into and forcing the receiver to work much harder. This could put it into protect mode and cause it to shut down.

The speaker is a three way speaker designed to take 2 inputs (it has 2 tweeters). Is this incorrect?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrted46 /forum/post/19640239


The speaker is a three way speaker designed to take 2 inputs (it has 2 tweeters). Is this incorrect?

How many pairs of binding posts or wire clips does it have?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rolls-Royce /forum/post/19640363


How many pairs of binding posts or wire clips does it have?

4 (2 for L and 2 for R). This is the only reason I went with a 3 way speaker rather than a "standard" 2 way in bathroom.
 

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Unless that speaker's owner's manual specifically says L and R, they are really for low and high frequencies. These types of speakers also have a metal bridging plate(s) between the terminals that must be removed when they are not being driven by a single amp. The issue with driving a speaker like this with separate L/R channels, even when it works, is that you are sending the left channel signal to only the low-frequency side and the right channel signal to only the high-frequency side. Or vice-versa. You aren't hearing everything from either channel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rolls-Royce /forum/post/19640585


Unless that speaker's owner's manual specifically says L and R, they are really for low and high frequencies. These types of speakers also have a metal bridging plate(s) between the terminals that must be removed when they are not being driven by a single amp. The issue with driving a speaker like this with separate L/R channels, even when it works, is that you are sending the left channel signal to only the low-frequency side and the right channel signal to only the high-frequency side. Or vice-versa. You aren't hearing everything from either channel.

Here is a blurp from the description:

The speaker comes with two sets of speaker wire terminals for wiring in two channels to achieve a stereo effect from a single speaker by pivoting the tweeters towards different points in the room and using accoustic reflection.


Also here is the wiring guide
http://www.monoprice.com/bbs/files/H...stallation.pdf


I do not think it is for seperating high and low frequencies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The wiring guide that came with this speaker, specifically says:

How To Guide for installing 6‐1/2 Inches Glass Composite 3‐

Way, Dual Voice Coil, Stereo In‐Ceiling Speaker

Option 1: Stereo Sound From 1 Speaker (2 channels per speaker)


If you are running a stereo signal to the speaker (like right and left), then hook up each set of speaker

wires to a separate terminal on the back of the speaker. So both terminals will be used. Keep the jumper

cable set at standard single speaker stereo. On one of the speaker terminals only reverse the positive

and negative wires, so your positive speaker wire will go to black and your negative will go to red. This

will make sure you don't have phase cancellation problems.



Is this not true?
 

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OK, it does say L & R. This way of using a speaker is new to me. If you have your speaker wires installed as shown in Fig 1, you should be good. There are some other things that can be causing the problem, among them the volume control. It may be presenting too low a load to the receiver. Or there is an impedance mismatch between the bedroom and bathroom speakers, with the bathroom lower. In that case, I'd set the receiver to the lower impedance if possible. Check all the wiring out to the bathroom speakers. Perhaps a strand of wire is bridging somewhere in the chain. Are you running the bedroom and bathroom speakers at the same time (A+B)? Your receiver may not like to do this even though it's capable, especially if there's a chance of mismatched impedances.


BTW, are the impedance selector jumpers on that volume control correctly set for the speaker's impedance? Monoprice's website specifically mentions that there are some.
 

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Hard to believe the volume control is causing a low impance, unless it's acting as a short. I would have assumed, in the wost case scenario, it act like a straight wire, and the impedance seen by the receiver would be the speaker's impedance.


Did you try bypassing the volume control to rule it out?


The bathroom speaker itself could have an issue. I had a damaged speaker once which would act as if it was a short, when I turned the volume up high enough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelJHuman /forum/post/19641410


Hard to believe the volume control is causing a low impance, unless it's acting as a short. I would have assumed, in the wost case scenario, it act like a straight wire, and the impedance seen by the receiver would be the speaker's impedance.


Did you try bypassing the volume control to rule it out?


The bathroom speaker itself could have an issue. I had a damaged speaker once which would act as if it was a short, when I turned the volume up high enough.

I will try to bypass the volume control to see if this is an issue.


The volume control is in a tight space, maybe it is possible a strand is hitting somewhere causing a short? I will take a look. I did not think this is possible because at moderate volume it sounds perfect. When you crank it, it turns off (bathroom speaker only).
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rolls-Royce /forum/post/19641366


OK, it does say L & R. This way of using a speaker is new to me. If you have your speaker wires installed as shown in Fig 1, you should be good. There are some other things that can be causing the problem, among them the volume control. It may be presenting too low a load to the receiver. Or there is an impedance mismatch between the bedroom and bathroom speakers, with the bathroom lower. In that case, I'd set the receiver to the lower impedance if possible. Check all the wiring out to the bathroom speakers. Perhaps a strand of wire is bridging somewhere in the chain. Are you running the bedroom and bathroom speakers at the same time (A+B)? Your receiver may not like to do this even though it's capable, especially if there's a chance of mismatched impedances.


BTW, are the impedance selector jumpers on that volume control correctly set for the speaker's impedance? Monoprice's website specifically mentions that there are some.

Wether I run the speakers at the same time, seperate (even removing the bedroom speakers from the system), I get the same results. It is always at the same volume level also. For example, if I put the volume control at half way and then hit 51 on the receiver it will shut off. Or if I lower the volume control and then go to, lets say 71 on receiver it will always shut off at the same point.


I will double check the impedance jumpers thanx for that.
 
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