AVS Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm looking to find a mid-range receiver and speakers for around $1000, and am somewhat overwhelmed when doing research. It seems like $1000 is not enough to get a decent set of equipment unless I go the HTIB route, so that's where I'd like some advice. I'm not an audiophile by any means, so the sound quality doesn't need to be perfect. I'd rather pay more for a better receiver now and get 5.1 channel speakers, than to get a crappy receiver now and more speakers. I've been eyeing the Onkyo TX-SR607, and saw it on Amazon for $388, so I was about to buy it. However, finding separate speakers seems to be somewhat of a challenge to keep it under $600 for those. Does anyone have any reccomendations? It's going to be in a somewhat small room, about 14'x12', so 7 speakers is most likely too many for now. Any insight would be appreciated, thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I put together my first "above average" setup last year, which consisted of a Denon AVR-789 with (5) B&W M1 speakers and a Premier Acoustic PA-120. I've since started upgrading, but only because this setup was previously in my living room and I'm now putting together a full-blown theater room (the living room will no longer have any AV gear in it).


I believe the entire setup cost me right around $1100 after getting a good deal on the receiver online, picking up the B&Ws used and using Bing.com to score the sub for right around $200 shipped.


Good luck finding an HTiB that sounds this good for the $$.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
490 Posts
You could always start with a 2.1 or 3.1 and add the rears later. Cheaper rears could also be used.


You could get two Paradigm SE1's with a refurbed Onkyo 507 or 607 from accessories4less and a $300 sub to start. Very nice setup, especially in a small room and it should be right around $1000. Then you could add the center and rears later for as cheap as $400-500.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,995 Posts
Hey Shak, don't get discouraged.....$1k is enough for a respectable 5.1 system and you're already putting in the work needed to put things together. The 607 is a good mid-level AVR and the price you found helps with allowing for more $$$ towards the speakers. You're right at the correct ratio of 2:1 cost Speakers to AVR. Now you've mentioned your room size and what you want from the system which is a great first step. Now on to some important things to consider......


The room itself and correct placement of the speakers is just as important as the speakers themselves, if not more. Unless the room is void of furnishings, a large floorstanding speaker isn't for you. A stand mounted monitor style speaker fits the bill in such a space, or should i say bill$. No need for something big as you're going to send the low frequency content to a subwoofer whose larger diameter driver is more adept at the task. Let the monitors play in the range intended of midbass through to 20khz. Place your monitors on stands with at least 1 ft of space behind and 2ft to the side walls to avoid early reflections. Assure that the 'point source' part of the speaker is at ear level to the listener on the horizontal plain. If these basic measures are followed, an inexpensive monitor speaker with somewhat low distortion and a moderately flat frequency response will sound like 10X the cost of a high end setup in and on the wrong space. If possible, and it's usually not the case, move the listening position off of a rear wall if it is so. This will decrease the rear wall reflections and the bass muddiness that develops behing the listeners. In the case of surround it also gives the rear channel info a chance to 'develop' and react with the room.


Now....an ugly truth. A acceptable performing subwoofer is going to eat up near HALF of your remaining budget! and rightfully so. You're paying for an amplifier, a large diameter driver and what should be a resonant free enclosure......paramount importance when considering low frequency reproduction. Spend wisely as it's the cornerstone of any respectable system.


So.....the next step is shopping of course. In your price point IMO it's better to trade away some things for a good closeout deal. There's a lot of speaker(s) out there selling for a fraction of what the MSRP is simply due to the poor economy and the trend towards HTIB for casual users who like the simpler option. Supply and demand rules the day here. Some will say go out and audition or listen to some systems but truth be told, there's no value in that unless you can listen to them at home as the acoustics of the listening environment will have a profound effect on the soundfield. When you find a speaker you like on sight, un-listened...search it here on the forums for real world users comments....or send a PM asking what they liked or disliked. Also don't be afraid of used from audio specialty sites classifieds such as Audiogon and the like. These guys are always looking for Nirvana from their speakers and buying and selling all the time. They're usually fanatical about their gear and honest when listing the description and condition.


Good luck on your quest and yes, it's doable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,832 Posts
For a grand you want to buy a $300 receiver like santapimp suggested, either a onkyo or marantz. And then the rest on some floorstanders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
Hey,


You can follow my lead on this and check out how I'm doing this. I got to hear three different receiver's auto-tune. The Denon's Audyssey, Harman Kardon's and Pioneer's MCACC. It was pretty clear to me that the MCACC blew the others away in clarity, imaging and tonality in the highs. The Denon and HK were very similar sounding and when switched on seemed like a heavy cloth was thrown over the speakers. Now, the thing that kicks me in the butt is the Pioneer receiver he got is the 919 model. It's not "THX" nor is it anything special and costs just $400.


The MCACC made things sound more alive and gave a better sense of being surrounded. My brother's speakers weren't the greatest in the world, just standard/cheap Polk speakers but the MCACC helped them sound as good as they could sound in my opinion. Before my brother bought the Pioneer receiver, he had a Harkman Kardon (I think the model was the avr225) but he sent it back to HK for a refund after comparing Pioneer's MCACC to it in a direct matchup (and Pioneer's amp has been bench tested to be less powerful than Harman's, yet Pioneer's receiver sounds clearly better when both auto-tunes are applied and comparted head to head).


I have also heard a standard Denon receiver's Audyssey on my older brother's system and it sounded worse turned on than it did shut off.



So, it's pretty safe to say I'm ordering the Pioneer 919 model receiver for $400.


My speakers are going to be my own frankenstein hogepodge. I bought a used Cambridge Soundworks PSW1 subwoofer. I am going to buy and try out some old/used but still good condition Optimus LX5 speakers and wall-mount them for my surrounds (because they have dipole tweeters). I haven't quite decided on my front speakers but I'm leaning toward three Fluance center channels set on pedestals standing upright (for their limited vertical yet wide horizontal dispersion).


This setup will come in under $1000 for the audio portion. Plus, don't forget accessories!


Receiver = $400

Sub = $180

Fronts = $250 - $300

Surrounds = $100

100-feet 16awg Speaker wire = $13


Total = $943 - $993
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Speaker suggestion:


Paradigm Cinema 70. It's $650, and you get a full 5.1 system that will sound better than anything else in the price range. It's small and stylish, so you can put them anywhere too.


And then just find the AVR of choice (I'd agree on the Pioneer 919) and you've got yourself and amazing $1000 system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,285 Posts
Not a fan boy of the speakers or the seller. Just passing on information. Recieved a Crutchfield catalog today. They have the Infinity Primus speakers on sale, as well as some Polks. Either of these are a great starting point and can be done in your budget.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
I think buying used off ebay and craigslist will get you more bang for your buck on speakers. The technology on speakers is the same now as it was 10 years ago. Nothing has changed. The manufacturers swap around different specs and make the enclosures look different but you still have the same science of sound at work. If anything revolutionary happened with home audio speakers today it would follow car audio's lead where they have fully active digital crossovers and compact, high efficiency amps with lots of power to fit in small places.


Until that starts to happen, used speakers will put you a whole other price level above your budget. If your budget is $500, buying used will get you quality on the $1000 budget level. However, it will be a pain in the booty to be patient and wait for the right deals to come along.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
over the course of a week, went between Craigslist and Ebay and picked up a Pioneer Elite VSX92txh, a pair of Boston Acoustics VR960's (w/ built in powered subs) for front mains, VR940's for full sized surrounds, VR10 Center. Total came to $980.....sooo very worth the hassle of looking around
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
You could get the SVS SBS-01 system with a decent receiver for $300 but that would put you at $1300+ Marlin had a good suggestion with Paradigm or you could go with a Definitive system like the Cinema 60 or 80 and a decent receiver for around $1000 ...all of these would be much better than a HTIB...imo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I'm in a similar situation as the OP. I actually currently have a very cheap HTiB system but I'm looking to upgrade. My biggest hinderance is I could easily but a couple bookshelves and a nice center in the front but I don't really have a good spot to put rears that are much bigger than satellite type speakers. How importance is balance between the rears and the front? Will I notice the drop in quality that much if I spend my money on nice front speakers as opposed to a moderate 5.1 system like the ones suggested here?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,040 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Timothy91 /forum/post/18316203


I think buying used off ebay and craigslist will get you more bang for your buck on speakers.

I've heard that white vans are great for buying speakers. It takes some patience but man it's worth it.
Quote:
The technology on speakers is the same now as it was 10 years ago. Nothing has changed. The manufacturers swap around different specs and make the enclosures look different but you still have the same science of sound at work.

No doubt! Nothing else has changed in 10 years why should speakers be any different!
Quote:
If anything revolutionary happened with home audio speakers today it would follow car audio's lead where they have fully active digital crossovers and compact, high efficiency amps with lots of power to fit in small places.

I've always thought that car audio is the bleeding edge. Technologically speaking of course.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
When faced with this same dilemma several years ago I went with clearance Infinity Primus 5.0 setup with an Onkyo 604. Given it to do over again I'd go with phantom center and buy an 8xx series with more power and the ability to do pre-amp output because low end centers generally suck and I would have been setup to power my next set of speakers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for all the information, I really appreciate it. I think I'll look on ebay and craigslist for speakers right now, but get the receiver new. So the pioneer 919 is better than the Onkyo 607? I noticed they're the same price.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top