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Folks,


I am trying to decide on one of two receivers for my HT system: Pioneer VSX-D912 ($300) and Denon 2803 ($550), both in the 90-100 WPS range. The Pioneer (validated by Pioneer Cust Serv.) has a single freq. range for the sub, 100hz. The Denon has several (not sure, but I think they are 60, 80, 100, etc.). The question is, How much will it effect my movie/music listening to always have below 100hz played by my sub? I ordered a sub for the first time (never had one before) and I think its a nice one (HSU) and want to make the most out of it. I know I can set the sub, but if for instance I set the sub to pick-up anything below 80hz, and the receiver sends
 

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Not an easy answer for you because of so many other variables - your speakers for instance, and your room's reflections/resonances. Anyway, unless you have one of the older models, the HSU should allow you to send it a LFE signal from the receiver sub-out so that it will bypass the sub's internal crossover. Then the sub will see only the low-passed frequencies as you set it in the receiver. If you send the sub 100 Hz. The THX standard is 80 Hz crossover, and that's what I use for movies, but not everyone agrees and many with big front speakers like to play with separate crossovers for different speakers. Here is a good article you may find helpful on sub settings:

http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volum...rs-9-2002.html


The Denon will definitely give you more flexibility. As for the Pioneer's automatic room setup I don't know how well it works with room correction. But for setting speaker levels I doubt that it will do anything you can't do as well or better yourself with a Radio Shack SPL meter and a little judicious speaker placement.


Dsmith
 

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DSmith,


Thanks for the response.

Quote:
If you send the sub 100 Hz.
Yes, but what will my 'Mains' play...my guess is >100hz, just like the surrounds, right?


I read the article you suggested, and saved it. Great article, even though a lot of it was over my head. Seemed to say at one point that there are advantages to having your sub play up to 100HZ, in that it takes the burden off the rest of the speakers.


The HSU I bought (VTF-2) has received great reviews. One of the interesting things about it, is that it had two modes: maximum extension, and maximum output, whcih are changed by filling one or more ports with a foam peice they give you (actually, I have not opened the box yet...still painting). I want to take advantage of the sub's capabilities, which is why I asked the Q in the first place. Seems like the Denon might allow more flexibility to do so.


Frank
 

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I thought the 912 let you set 3 levels, 80, 100, or 120. You can download the manual from the Pioneer site. I looked at the 912 and bought a Kenwood VR 7070 for the same $ because I thought quality was better (but it only has a 80 HZ crossover per THX requirements).
 

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The point of the article was that global settings (all speakers crossed over at the same point) was least likely to cause problems. Some receivers and pre/pros allow you to set the main speakers to full-range (large) when in 2 channel (direct) mode. My Citation 7.0 does that, as does my H/K AVR520. For HT surround soundtracks I think most of us are best off using a global crossover of 80 Hz per the THX standard. I do that on movies using a SVS sub and it sounds great. My music, OTOH, is all analog and all speakers are full-range (large) without a sub through the Citation.


Dsmith
 
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