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When you guys wall mount do you just pass through the power cable into a wallplate behind the TV and out another wallplate near the bottom and into a existing receptacle or do you actually install and wire one of those countersunk receptacles behind the TV?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalart /forum/post/20771170


When you guys wall mount do you just pass through the power cable into a wallplate behind the TV and out another wallplate near the bottom and into a existing receptacle or do you actually install and wire one of those countersunk receptacles behind the TV?

Not at all legal or wise.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by olyteddy /forum/post/20772435


Not at all legal or wise.


Gee -are the police going to know on your door and arrest you if you drop the power cable inside the wall? Is there a Supreme Court ruling on that?


Only "legal" issue is if you had an inspector in the house for some reason, and all they would say is change that, and leave. In most cases, again I said most, it's non issue. Your house is not going to burn down because you fished a heavy double jacketed cable through some drywall. This discussion comes up every year or so and while it may be 'nice' to run Romex and install a recessed outlet behind the TV, I'd wager 90% of the population that cares if the cord is visible simply punch a hole and drop the cable down. I've seen many nice homes with a set of black cable running down the wall, no one seemed to care.
 

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out of curiosity, how many failed/sparking power cables have you guys seen? ive never seen a single faulty power cable.. by faulty i mean any damage at all along the whole cable (im talking detachable 3 wire power cables like for TV and monitors).. if we're talking vaccuum poewr cables then yes they fray a lot.


more importantly, how many times did u see damage along the actual cable from typical use, not counting the ends that wouldnt be in the wall anyways?
 

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Are u gonna do something illegal irfan?



This particular regulation am sure (if not it oughtta be) is designed so you don't run a "christmas tree" extension cable behind then plug like 10 things onto it. Also it's designed to idiot-proof, when u sell the house and you forget to pull the cable, the new owner drills into the wall and...


Correctness police need no comment on my reply.
 

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I used a product called Power Bridge ( http://www.powerbridgesolution.com/ )


It's similar in concept to the product from Panamax that is mentioned above. You can buy stuff direct from Power Bridge's web site, but various other places sell the same product. For that matter, I think Best Buy carries it, albeit at higher prices than online.


You basically have a reverse (male) power connector at the plate that is low down on the wall. Then you use normal Romex for the in-wall wiring between the two plates. At the plate behind the TV is a regular outlet. Power is brought to the lower plate by a normal extension cord (they provide a short one in the kit, since normally it will be either run directly to a nearby existing outlet, or possibly to a power-strip for lightning protection).


Because the wiring of the Power Bridge never involves live circuits, it gets around some of the legal restrictions on doing electrical wiring without permits or inspections. And I suppose it is somewhat safer during the installation process. If you live in an area that doesn't allow the use of normal in-wall Romex, you can use metal-sheath wiring.


The version that I bought has a second open cutout to pass other cables (as in the web link) - I have 3 HDMI cables routed to my TV (2 in use at the moment). Standard dimension "Decora" style wall-plate inserts (the ones that fit into basically a rectangle opening within the actual wall plate) can also be used at the "other wiring" cutout - I used an insert that has three HDMI connectors, for the end that is behind the TV. You don't have to buy the inserts from Power Bridge - any "Decora" format insert will fit. Home Depot carries a fair assortment, although they only had single and dual HDMI inserts, not the triple I was looking for. (So in summary I ran short HDMI cables from the TV to the wall plate insert behind it, and then have longer HDMI cables running through the wall to the lower plate. At the lower end, I have about 3 feet of the HDMI cables just coming out of the wall, to avoid a second set of connectors, but I could push those cable ends inside the wall and use a second 3xHDMI wall plate connector insert, if I wanted a slightly neater appearance.)


The length of Romex that comes with the Power Bridge kit is enough to go between a wall mount and a lower plate that is directly underneath. In my case I needed a longer length, as I was also moving laterally past two studs. If you are just dropping down vertically the installation is very simple - bypassing studs requires a bit more work, and or creativity....


One other tip is that in fishing the HDMI cables through the wall, I found it was better and easier to avoid higher-priced HDMI cables that are thicker. I needed 10-foot cables, and found some inexpensive high-speed cables at either Monoprice or Ram Electronics (online). I bought one supposedly "higher quality" cable, and two cheaper ones. All three work just fine, and in the end the cheaper, thinner ones were easier to fish. I DO think it is worthwhile to test-play a Blu-ray disk through each cable, after you fish them, but before buttoning everything up, just to make sure that the fishing process didn't harm anything.
 

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Run power to code for your area. If you had to put in a home insurance claim for whatever reason. Even totally unrelated to power and the adjuster saw something like a power cord run in the wall I can guarantee they would deny you faster than you could blink.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by valhalla
Run power to code for your area. If you had to put in a home insurance claim for whatever reason. Even totally unrelated to power and the adjuster saw something like a power cord run in the wall I can guarantee they would deny you faster than you could blink.
Don't go around making stuff up. There is nothing in your homeowner's insurance that says they will deny your claim because you didn't install a power cord to code. They can't legally deny your claim because a fire was started by it and certainly not just because it exists (and is not the cause of a fire).


HSAT, I would recommend that you install a new surge protected outlet behind the TV. You can buy them at Lowe's. A ten year old could do it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rschleicher
I used a product called Power Bridge ( http://www.powerbridgesolution.com/ )


It's similar in concept to the product from Panamax that is mentioned above. You can buy stuff direct from Power Bridge's web site, but various other places sell the same product. For that matter, I think Best Buy carries it, albeit at higher prices than online.


You basically have a reverse (male) power connector at the plate that is low down on the wall. Then you use normal Romex for the in-wall wiring between the two plates. At the plate behind the TV is a regular outlet. Power is brought to the lower plate by a normal extension cord (they provide a short one in the kit, since normally it will be either run directly to a nearby existing outlet, or possibly to a power-strip for lightning protection).


Because the wiring of the Power Bridge never involves live circuits, it gets around some of the legal restrictions on doing electrical wiring without permits or inspections. And I suppose it is somewhat safer during the installation process. If you live in an area that doesn't allow the use of normal in-wall Romex, you can use metal-sheath wiring.


The version that I bought has a second open cutout to pass other cables (as in the web link) - I have 3 HDMI cables routed to my TV (2 in use at the moment). Standard dimension "Decora" style wall-plate inserts (the ones that fit into basically a rectangle opening within the actual wall plate) can also be used at the "other wiring" cutout - I used an insert that has three HDMI connectors, for the end that is behind the TV. You don't have to buy the inserts from Power Bridge - any "Decora" format insert will fit. Home Depot carries a fair assortment, although they only had single and dual HDMI inserts, not the triple I was looking for. (So in summary I ran short HDMI cables from the TV to the wall plate insert behind it, and then have longer HDMI cables running through the wall to the lower plate. At the lower end, I have about 3 feet of the HDMI cables just coming out of the wall, to avoid a second set of connectors, but I could push those cable ends inside the wall and use a second 3xHDMI wall plate connector insert, if I wanted a slightly neater appearance.)


The length of Romex that comes with the Power Bridge kit is enough to go between a wall mount and a lower plate that is directly underneath. In my case I needed a longer length, as I was also moving laterally past two studs. If you are just dropping down vertically the installation is very simple - bypassing studs requires a bit more work, and or creativity....


One other tip is that in fishing the HDMI cables through the wall, I found it was better and easier to avoid higher-priced HDMI cables that are thicker. I needed 10-foot cables, and found some inexpensive high-speed cables at either Monoprice or Ram Electronics (online). I bought one supposedly "higher quality" cable, and two cheaper ones. All three work just fine, and in the end the cheaper, thinner ones were easier to fish. I DO think it is worthwhile to test-play a Blu-ray disk through each cable, after you fish them, but before buttoning everything up, just to make sure that the fishing process didn't harm anything.
I recommend Blue Jeans Cable, myself. They have quality cables that are thin and will advise you which cables to get for the distance. I use Blue Jean cables almost exclusively now.
 
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