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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Yamaha RX-V1400 has a setting in the menu called Dynamic Range. Its options are MIN, STD, and MAX. The receiver defaults to MAX.


Can I get some recommendations on which setting is best and the relation considerations when choosing this setting?


When I switch from MAX to STD the volume gets a lot lower. Because of this it is hard to really A/B these settings to determine which I like better.


Under what conditions is one setting recommended over another? Thanks.
 

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Max is for normal listening. Min would be for night listening when everyone else is asleep. The volume differences between the loud and soft portions of movies is reduced.


On other receivers I think its called "night mode".
 

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If you have bad hearing like me from too much rock and roll, you might want to try min. The reason being that you can hear dialog better without turning up the volume. If you are constantly adjusting the volume up and down I would try min.
 

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Yamaha receivers have had it backwards in the past. MAX refers to MAX compression, which is minimum dynamic range. MIN refers to minimum compression, which is maximum dynamic range. I was able to confirm this through speaking to Yamaha directly and by taking measurements with an SPL meter. On dynamic subwoofer passages there was an increase of 15-20db on the MIN setting. YMMV
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by toenail /forum/post/0


Yamaha receivers have had it backwards in the past. MAX refers to MAX compression, which is minimum dynamic range. MIN refers to minimum compression, which is maximum dynamic range. I was able to confirm this through speaking to Yamaha directly and by taking measurements with an SPL meter. On dynamic subwoofer passages there was an increase of 15-20db on the MIN setting. YMMV

You said that Yamaha receivers have had it backwards "in the past". Does that mean they have changed the settings more recently? And how does the OP's RX-V1400's settings work?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by geodon005 /forum/post/0


You said that Yamaha receivers have had it backwards "in the past". Does that mean they have changed the settings more recently? And how does the OP's RX-V1400's settings work?

Yes, thanks I was wondering the same exact thing.


When I changed between MIN and STD there is no noticeable difference in volume. When I change it to MAX it gets noticeably louder. Can this be used as an indicator to know what my MAX setting really represents (and if so, how)? Also what would be the steps to check this with a sound meter? What exactly would I be looking for?
 

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Louder could certainly indicate compression. The compressor is making quiter sounds louder thus decreasing the dynamic range. The extreme of the setting one way or the other should work like this:

max compression: Once you set the volume level, you should find yourself not having to turn up and down the volume as much

min compression(max dynamic range): Larger range of changes in sound level, you may find yourself adjusting the volume more to compensate
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovingdvd /forum/post/0


Yes, thanks I was wondering the same exact thing.


When I changed between MIN and STD there is no noticeable difference in volume. When I change it to MAX it gets noticeably louder. Can this be used as an indicator to know what my MAX setting really represents (and if so, how)? Also what would be the steps to check this with a sound meter? What exactly would I be looking for?

What does the owner's manual say? Typically, MAX means no compression. This makes sense in your case, because the feature is called Dynamic Range. It would seem to me that MAX means "Maximum Dynamic Range"....aka "no compression".


It should be easy to test....Watch a movie with quiet conversation...whichever mode makes the conversion "quietest" is Maximum Dynamic Range, which is the mode you want, unless you are trying to keep the noise down at night.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OK, now I am getting more confused based on the user's manual. This is what it says:


DYNAMIC RANGE

Use to select the amount of dynamic range compression to be applied when using NIGHT. This setting is effective only when the unit is decoding DD or DTS signals. Choices: MIN, STD, MAX. Select MAX for feature films. Select STD for general use. Select MIN for listening to sources at low volume levels.


So based on the above it would seem that this dynamic range control would ONLY apply once you have the NIGHT mode engaged. In other words, it sounds like it controls the amount of compression applied once you are in NIGHT mode.


However, this isn't making any sense, because when I toggle this between STD and MAX I hear a clear difference in volume (so the control is having an effect) except that I am NOT in the NIGHT listening mode. Confusing for sure. Any ideas here?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovingdvd /forum/post/0


OK, now I am getting more confused based on the user's manual. This is what it says:


DYNAMIC RANGE

Use to select the amount of dynamic range compression to be applied when using NIGHT. This setting is effective only when the unit is decoding DD or DTS signals. Choices: MIN, STD, MAX. Select MAX for feature films. Select STD for general use. Select MIN for listening to sources at low volume levels.


So based on the above it would seem that this dynamic range control would ONLY apply once you have the NIGHT mode engaged. In other words, it sounds like it controls the amount of compression applied once you are in NIGHT mode.


However, this isn't making any sense, because when I toggle this between STD and MAX I hear a clear difference in volume (so the control is having an effect) except that I am NOT in the NIGHT listening mode. Confusing for sure. Any ideas here?

I am at work, so I have not had a chance to test this on my own . . . what is the "clear difference in volume" that you hear? Which setting creates the higher volume?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by geodon005 /forum/post/0


You said that Yamaha receivers have had it backwards "in the past". Does that mean they have changed the settings more recently? And how does the OP's RX-V1400's settings work?

"In the past" refers to my model year (2005) for my RX-V450 and other similar models of that generation. Not sure where the 1400 falls.
 

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Be aware that the "overall" volume is not what is supposed to be affected by changing this setting. It's the difference between loud and soft passages. When you can barely hear the dialogue but the explosions scare you out of your seat, that is generally uncompressed and at it's most dynamic. When the dialogue and the explosions are at similar volume your are compressed and not very dynamic. I had used my RX-V450 with the MAX setting upon initial install because I had thought I was getting MAX dynamic range. After conversing with Yamaha and taking some measurements it became pretty obvious that I was missing a lot of dynamic range set up this way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by geodon005 /forum/post/0


I am at work, so I have not had a chance to test this on my own . . . what is the "clear difference in volume" that you hear? Which setting creates the higher volume?

I didn't play with it long, but from what I remember I was listening to dialog from the center speaker, and when I switched between MIN and STD there was no difference, but when I moved it to MAX the dialog got much louder.


There's definitely a lot of confusion surrounding this. First off, the text in the manual says that this selects the amount of dynamic range compression. So logically you would think MAX meant max compression. However maybe the description is being taken too literally here and MAX really does mean max dynamic range. Normally I would think so but the report from toenail makes me wonder.


Also it is interesting that the manual specifically says to use MAX for feature films. So that seems to make it pretty clear that they mean MAX = max dynamic range not max dynamic compression. However just because that's what they meant to write doesn't mean that's how it actually works...


Now that I have a better understanding of what to listen for I'm going to try finding some passages that go from dialog to something loud, then go back and forth in the different modes to see which gives me the greatest difference between the two and I'll assume that settings is for the max dynamic range.


Another thing to consider is that the receiver defaulted to the MAX settings. I would be very odd if Yamaha did this when this setting really meant max compression (so this is another thing in favor of max meaning max range not max compression).
 

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Generally this applies to amount of compression (at least on onkyo and denons), so Max means maximum compression of dynamic range and min will be minimum compression of dynamic range.


BTW, this applies to only Dolby Digital source material, so there will be no impact on other materials (non Dolby Digital).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovingdvd /forum/post/0


I didn't play with it long, but from what I remember I was listening to dialog from the center speaker, and when I switched between MIN and STD there was no difference, but when I moved it to MAX the dialog got much louder.

You answered your own question by this test. When you set it to max it reduced the gap between loudest (explosions etc in the movie) and quieter parts (dialogs), so you are better able to hear the dialogs now at even lower volume.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lovingdvd /forum/post/0


There's definitely a lot of confusion surrounding this. First off, the text in the manual says that this selects the amount of dynamic range compression. So logically you would think MAX meant max compression. However maybe the description is being taken too literally here and MAX really does mean max dynamic range. Normally I would think so but the report from toenail makes me wonder.

See the above.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lovingdvd /forum/post/0


Also it is interesting that the manual specifically says to use MAX for feature films. So that seems to make it pretty clear that they mean MAX = max dynamic range not max dynamic compression. However just because that's what they meant to write doesn't mean that's how it actually works...

Feature films are more likely to have larger difference between loudest and quieter parts, so it makes perfect sense to me. After all you will engage this during late night hours so that you can watch movies without disturbing others.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lovingdvd /forum/post/0


Now that I have a better understanding of what to listen for I'm going to try finding some passages that go from dialog to something loud, then go back and forth in the different modes to see which gives me the greatest difference between the two and I'll assume that settings is for the max dynamic range.

Make sure you select Dolby Digital tracks for your testing, this does not apply to non Dolby Digital sources.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lovingdvd /forum/post/0


Another thing to consider is that the receiver defaulted to the MAX settings. I would be very odd if Yamaha did this when this setting really meant max compression (so this is another thing in favor of max meaning max range not max compression).

I still think it is max compression, but let us know what you find in your testing. It is never too late to learn and I wouldn't mind learning few new things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks Axs. So you are saying from what I describe you think the proper setting would be MIN, assuming of course one wanted the fullest range possible and not concerned about loudness/night listening?


And if so, why would there even be a MIN? How about NONE? That's what I'd want... Confused still but will play around with it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by lovingdvd /forum/post/0


Thanks Axs. So you are saying from what I describe you think the proper setting would be MIN, assuming of course one wanted the fullest range possible and not concerned about loudness/night listening?


And if so, why would there even be a MIN? How about NONE? That's what I'd want... Confused still but will play around with it.

Good question and you got me curious enough to research it further, so now I can answer this with more confidence. Here it is:


That does really correspond to minimum or maximum compression and just by selecting this (std/min/max) you have not really activated the DRC yet.


It gets activated when you press "Night" button on your remote to toggle it on/off. When night mode is ON, whatever setting you have selected for dynamic range (std/min/max) will be used for DRC.


If you don't want any compression of dynamic range, just turn off "Night" function by pressing "Night" button on remote again. It shows the current status of night function on front LCD panel, if it is on.


It also provides you option for different settings for SP (speaker) and HP (headphone).


Hope this helps.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by axs /forum/post/0


Good question and you got me curious enough to research it further, so now I can answer this with more confidence. Here it is:


That does really correspond to minimum or maximum compression and just by selecting this (std/min/max) you have not really activated the DRC yet.


It gets activated when you press "Night" button on your remote to toggle it on/off. When night mode is ON, whatever setting you have selected for dynamic range (std/min/max) will be used for DRC.


If you don't want any compression of dynamic range, just turn off "Night" function by pressing "Night" button on remote again. It shows the current status of night function on front LCD panel, if it is on.


It also provides you option for different settings for SP (speaker) and HP (headphone).


Hope this helps.

Now you've really got me confused. All of the testing I did was with DD5.1 sources and I never use the "night" function so it remains off. How would you explain the measurable differences in output while changing from MIN to MAX under these circumstances? I saw the results with both the LED indicating output level in db on my BFD for the subwoofer and with a RatShack spl meter. It's also painfully obvious to the naked ear if you've got the volume up pretty loud while testing.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by toenail /forum/post/0


Now you've really got me confused. All of the testing I did was with DD5.1 sources and I never use the "night" function so it remains off. How would you explain the measurable differences in output while changing from MIN to MAX under these circumstances? I saw the results with both the LED indicating output level in db on my BFD for the subwoofer and with a RatShack spl meter. It's also painfully obvious to the naked ear if you've got the volume up pretty loud while testing.

That's my understanding from reading rx-v1400 owner's manual. Here is what owner's manual says

Quote:
Dynamic Range (page# 52 of owner's manual)


Use to select the amount of dynamic range compression to be applied to your speakers or

headphones when using NIGHT (see page 33). This setting is effective only when the unit is

decoding Dolby Digital and DTS signals.

Listening at night (page# 33 of owner's manual)


This mode reproduces dialogue clearly while reducing the volume of loud sound effects for easier

listening at low volumes or at night.


Press NIGHT on the remote control.


The NIGHT indicator in the front panel display lights up.

Press NIGHT again to cancel. The NIGHT indicator goes off.

-- You can use the night mode with any sound field programs except Direct Stereo (even though the NIGHT indicator lights up during Direct Stereo mode).


-- Night listening mode may vary in effectiveness depending on the input source and surround sound setting you use.

It is quite clear. I don't see, how it can be interpreted any differently.
 

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I didn't mean to sound like I was questioning what you found in writing, only why the explaination differed so greatly from what I found in real world observation. Maybe the OP's RX-V1400 and my RX-V450 handle dynamic range compression differently. Time to check my manual.
 
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