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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently have a Mitsubishi SVHS VCR (can't remember the model number) that was a good VCR but I don't think it was a top of the line model. Out of curiousity, for optimal SVHS transfers to DVD, what are the top of the line recommended VCRs that would have a TBC? I know JVC made some good ones but its been awhile since I paid much attention to SVHS VCRs. For people that have done a lot of tape transfers already, is it best to stick with playing from the VCR that recorded the tape, or does it matter?
 

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squonk, I've had good luck with this. The most important feature you will want on your VCR is an "edit" mode. It may be called somethings else on your Mits, but what is does is suppress high frequency signals from the output. Turns out that when you make a copy, the high frequencies degrade the copy substantially. This appears as noise, particularly between transitions between dark and bright areas. Without this feature, your copies will not be nearly as good. If you have one of the later Pioneer recorders, you can sharpen the image (put back the high frequencies) before buring the DVD. If you have a Panasonic, it's been reported you will get excellent copies using the composite inputs. It's possible the Panos ignore the high frequency signals over composite input.


As for playing back the tapes on the same VCR were they were made, if the VCR is function properly, then they should play back just as good or better on other equipment.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by squonk
So what SVHS VCR do you have or recommend? What about a time base corrector in the VCR?
Not at home now, but I think I have a JVC 9900. It was the high-end consumer S-VHS recorder when I bought it several years back. It does have the edit feature and TBC. I never used the TBC because it actually degraded the S-VHS copies I made. It may, however, be useful for tapes made on other VCRs, but I never saw any improvement with rented tapes, for example.


JVC probably has a newer model, but the high-end JVC S-VHS recorders are considered to be the best consumer grade units. Like it mentioned before, try to get a recorder with the edit feature, since this will have the biggest effect on your copies.
 

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Nobody seems to complain about this but me. To get good audio from the HiFi Stereo audio tracks I must playback VHS and S-VHS tapes on the VCR that recorded them. If I don't, a lot of the dialog has a harsh distorted sound. I have two Panasonic AG-1960's and a AG-1980. By using headphones I can tell right away if the machine I am using to play the tape is one that recorded it. Only the 1980 has a TBC on playback.


Video quality is secondary to audio quality for me. I will always playback a tape in the VCR that recorded it, if it has a HiFi Stereo audio track. If it only has the linear mono audio track then I will probably play it back in the 1980 because it has the TBC which usually produces the best video quality.


Dave
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by probepro
Not at home now, but I think I have a JVC 9900. It was the high-end consumer S-VHS recorder when I bought it several years back. It does have the edit feature and TBC. I never used the TBC because it actually degraded the S-VHS copies I made. It may, however, be useful for tapes made on other VCRs, but I never saw any improvement with rented tapes, for example.


JVC probably has a newer model, but the high-end JVC S-VHS recorders are considered to be the best consumer grade units. Like it mentioned before, try to get a recorder with the edit feature, since this will have the biggest effect on your copies.
probepro - I have one of the low end jvc svcr's, but it does have the "edit" mode. As I recall, the manual said to use edit mode when dubbing tapes (from vcr to vcr).

I have always interpreted that as I should use the edit mode when I was recording a tape that was being played on another vcr. Your post is telling me that I should be using edit mode while playing a tape to be recorded by another component (vcr, dvdr). Or should I always be using edit mode when dubbing, regardless of whether the JVC is doing the playing or the recording?
 

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I use a JVC 9911 to dub VHS tapes to my E80. The VCR is set to Edit mode for playback and I use the composite connections. I experimented a lot and this gave me the best transfers.


When dubbing from one VCR to another VCR, I set both to Edit mode. When recording from analog or digital satellite, I set the VCR to Auto mode.


John
 

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Originally Posted by longplay
probepro - I have one of the low end jvc svcr's, but it does have the "edit" mode. As I recall, the manual said to use edit mode when dubbing tapes (from vcr to vcr).

I have always interpreted that as I should use the edit mode when I was recording a tape that was being played on another vcr. Your post is telling me that I should be using edit mode while playing a tape to be recorded by another component (vcr, dvdr). Or should I always be using edit mode when dubbing, regardless of whether the JVC is doing the playing or the recording?
My understanding of edit mode is that it filters out the high frequencies on playback, i.e, outbound, not inbound, from the VCR. It won't hurt to turn it on on the VCR you are dubbing to, but I'm pretty sure it won't make a difference. You could of course prove this by making a test tape with the "from" VCR's edit mode turned off, and then toggling the "to" VCR's edit mode on and off to see if there is a difference. If you do decide to do the test, I'd appreciate learning about your results.
 

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I dug up the owners manual for my jvc svcr, tonight.


In the section on dubbing tapes it says:

"Set the edit mode to "ON" for the VCRS if such a mode is equiped.

On this VCR, set "PICTURE CONTROL" to "EDIT" (PG 15)"."


on pg 15:

"Edit : minimizes picture degradation during editing (recording and playback).


So it didn't hurt (and according to the manual, may have helped) to have EDIT turned on on my recording SVCR all these years, and since my playing VCR didn't have an edit function, then no harm - no foul.


But thanks to this discussion and probepro, I now know to turn the edit function ON for my tape to DVDR dubs, since what was once my "recording svcr", is now my "playing svcr". Glad I learned this now rather than later.


Probepro, I won't be making the test you suggested, because my videotape recording days are over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveC E100
Nobody seems to complain about this but me. To get good audio from the HiFi Stereo audio tracks I must playback VHS and S-VHS tapes on the VCR that recorded them. If I don't, a lot of the dialog has a harsh distorted sound. I have two Panasonic AG-1960's and a AG-1980. By using headphones I can tell right away if the machine I am using to play the tape is one that recorded it. Only the 1980 has a TBC on playback.


Video quality is secondary to audio quality for me. I will always playback a tape in the VCR that recorded it, if it has a HiFi Stereo audio track. If it only has the linear mono audio track then I will probably play it back in the 1980 because it has the TBC which usually produces the best video quality.


Dave
I know what you mean re audio not sounding right sometimes on other recorders. Its as if the audio tracks recorded on one VCR are just slightly out of sync with playback on another. Another frustration encountered in VHS tapes when I traded/collected concert tapes was people would transfer the darn things in mono instead of in stereo for some inexplicable reason, forcing you to change settings for playback on the VCR. Audio is really important to me also. The best VCR I ever had was a Mitsubishi, I think a U57, which had a wide expansive soundstage with great CD quality sound. Compared to that VCR, the newer subsequent models sounded like the soundstage had collapsed, as the manufacturers skimped on quality. That VCR had audio level controls also, which you never see anymore. Still have it although it needs some repair, if its not too bad to fix I think I'll keep it for the sound quality alone.
 
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