AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,


I'm trying to decide between a rectangular room with a door that opens out and likely the need to keep the equipment in a seperate space or an L-Shaped room with the equipment housed in the room and a door that opens inward.


All the existing doors in my house open into the room and I don't know how awkward a door that opens out will be. I do know that the rectangular room would be much easier to build in this case becuase it means not working with stairs or a Flu.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,605 Posts
L-shaped rooms are horrible sonically and even present display issues. What makes the rectangular room shape preferred is the dimensions are not multiples of each other.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Horrible soniclly?


Display issues?


Ok, I realize the L shaped room affects the acoustics and I don't have any doubts about that. What are these "display issues"?


If I build rectangular the dimentions are roughly as above 150x130x90 and as you can see they aren't multiples of each other. In fact the spreadsheet that I Dl'ed from Stereophile shows no problem frequencies at the sweet spot.


Lots of rectangular rooms that I plugged into that spreadsheet had dimentions that were not multiples but still had problem frequencies at the seating locations. So.. there's more going on then just trying to get a room without multiples.


Anyway, I'll consider the rectangular room. Perhaps I can make another small room off the theater that will house the equipment.


-Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,605 Posts
Meaning a L-shaped room creates problems with proper speaker placement and thus the sound would not be as good as if a rectangular room was used. Meaning, a L-shape room presents problems with projector screen problems or any display used as it would be placed asymmetrically. I attended a good CEDIA training session in 1995 by Russ Hershellman www.home-theater-guy.com entitled "Home Theatre:Essential Elements" in which he said the same thing I am in my two posts. 150x130x90 sized room is great, the dimensions are not equal.


"Perhaps I can make another small room off the theater that will house the equipment." Brian, you can consider a Xantech wired IR repeater system to control your concealed gear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well,


The part of this I find a bummer is that I'll be using either 4 chairs or I'll have 2 rows (4 and 3) and I'll have a room that's feels like being in a small plane.


Anyone else care to comment on the L shaped issues?


-Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,338 Posts
I have an L shaped room... actually I guess its a "J" shaped room, it has a little extra notch near the entrance to the stairs in the back of the room.


I intentionally didn't mention or request any specific info about it here, precisely because I know it wouldn't be considered "acceptable". My room is not a dedicated theater. Until you turn the lights off and fire up the projector. Then, I don't know anyone that wouldn't call it a theater.


I'm not an audiophile. I like good movies. I like good sound. My room provides me an abundance of both. I enjoy the extra room my "odd" layout provides, and so do my guests. Its a great space to hang out and watch a game. So, for me, it works spectacularly well.


I wouldn't suggest anyone else do what I did. It's not for me to say what someone else needs to do. I strongly believe that most everyone around here wants to help everyone else get the best HT experience possible... but at a certain point, you have to determine what you want your HT experience to be.


YMMV
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the reply Dave, and yours too HTG,


I picked up a current issue of Home Theater magizine (I think that's what it's called I don't usually buy HT magazines since discovering this forum) and they had an interesting article in which they rated a handfull of theaters for acoustics and then made recommendations.


I did find it interesting the the one that was best before the recommedations and scored all A's after was an L shaped room and no mention was made of the detrimental effect of the odd shape.


That's not to say that I don't believe that a rectangular room can be better. It's certainly easier to model with software.


I still haven't made up my mind. The rectangular theater is 138 or so square feet and the small L part of the portion actually adds another 50 Sg feet or so and makes the layout much less cramped.


I do appreciate all the input and hopefully I find more.


-Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Brian,


I have an L-shaped dedicated room. The main area is 14x14 and the other area is a 9x13 wet bar and exercise area. Works great and although I only used the Pioneer Elite MCACC to calibarte the room it sounds awesome to me. I have the stairs down to my second level behind the 14 square area so it is very oddly-shaped but has worked out great. We even built a 4x8 craft room on the other side of the stairs for my wife.


David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,605 Posts
Thanks for the kind words Brian. Russ did mention you could build a wall to convert a L-shaped room into a rectangular shaped one if so desired. Since he mentions “L†shaped rooms or rooms that open to other areas (like hallways, kitchens, etc.) have extremely complex acoustics that cannot be easily predicted. If your home has an open floorplan with archways leading from room to room, noise from your home theater pours throughout your entire home. You can often solve the noise problem and make your home theater room rectangular by closing any openings with a hard, finished wall or doors.


Design Idea: If you have a theater with a 5’ to 8’ wide archway opens to another room, install exterior grade French Doors (with weatherstrip and threshold) in the opening. Just close the doors when playing a movie or music, and reopen them after the show to restore the open floor plan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well,


I've decided to do a exterior door and also to do a double wall on the screen side since laundry and heating systems behind that wall generate noise.


I certainly want to be able to seal off the space as much as possible even though currently there is no other finished living space in the basement.


-Brian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,258 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by hometheaterguy
Thanks for the kind words Brian. Russ did mention you could build a wall to convert a L-shaped room into a rectangular shaped one if so desired. Since he mentions �L� shaped rooms or rooms that open to other areas (like hallways, kitchens, etc.) have extremely complex acoustics that cannot be easily predicted.
We routinely model L-shaped home theaters using Finite Element Analysis. What we find is that room modes can be predicted from the dimensions of each of the two rectangles of the "L", plus those of the rectangle enclosing both of them.


Regards,

Terry
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top