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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys!


My rear speakers are direct firing and in order to create a more 'diffuse' sound field I recently pointed the speakers to the back of the room instead of directly at the listeners.


The rear speaker to listener time distance in my pre-pro was set to the exact distance between the two.


Now that I effectively bounce the rear speaker signals off the back wall, should I be settinging the rear speaker to listener distance much higher to include the entire sound travel distance?


I'll try it both ways and see what sounds better... I was just curious!


Pre-pro in question is an Acurus ACT-3 (original version, non-abm).


Kal
 

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"My rear speakers are direct firing and in order to create a more 'diffuse' sound field I recently pointed the speakers to the back of the room instead of directly at the listeners."


I started doing that a few years ago. I like it a lot. An added benefit is that it gives me more space behind my rear-ported surrounds, for the ports to 'breathe'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
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Originally posted by radarblip
You are welcome Kal. Like lolittle, I applaud you for making the effort to create a more diffuse sound field in the surrounds. I need to do a better job of that with mine. I am actually thinking of trying some small speakers on the floor firing up when I go from 5.1 to 7.1.
Thanks guys. It was actually quite some time ago that I pointed the surround speakers away from the listeners - I only realized recently that this may also require a change in the delay.


Eventuall I want to replace the speakers with dipolar (bipolar?) surrounds, but my room poses some interesting challenges for the left surround as I have a large (structural support) pillar blocking the front of the speaker. Like many people, my room setup's not ideal so I've had to make due with what I have...


Kal
 

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"Eventuall I want to replace the speakers with dipolar (bipolar?) surrounds, but my room poses some interesting challenges for the left surround as I have a large (structural support) pillar blocking the front of the speaker."


I have a similar challenge. I have a fireplace in the middle of my left wall that juts out about 2'. My left surround is mounted on a Plexiglas shelf, with its center about 2' to the rear of the room, in relation to the fireplace.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by radarblip
I am actually thinking of trying some small speakers on the floor firing up when I go from 5.1 to 7.1.
I experienced something like that for about a week when I was first setting up my 7.1 system. I had mail-ordered four wall mounts for my surround speakers and, while waiting for them to arrive, decided to cut my wires to length and place all four surround speakers on the floor in their correct locations, ready to be mounted. Getting impatient with the wait, I connected the speakers, pointed them all upwards and fired up the system.


Interesting results. The sound was very ambient and enveloping. Even more interesting: as diffuse as the surround field was, I didn't lose directionality; i.e., sounds from the left, right and behind still came from those directions. Surprisingly enjoyable.


Best,

Sanjay
 

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Radarblip may be right on this, but I am not so sure. From my readings it is the first reflections that arrive within something like .2ms of the direct (unreflected) sound that interferes with sound quality, at least in stereo (2 channel). With HT I thought delays in the surrounds was to add ambience, and also special surround effects. So to maintain the intended soundtrack timing, the longer the distance between the rear speakers and the listener, the shorter the delay. If direct firing speakers are pointed away from the listener to reflect off side/rear walls you effectively lengthen the acoustic distance between the drivers and the listener. So it seems to me you should add the distance in feet in the measurement. This is what I have done in my settings - and similar to Kal I have my surround speakers reflecting off my side walls. Is there some official technical advice on this; if so I would like to see it.


Dsmith
 
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