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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi folks,


I have a Pioneer Elite 610HD RPTV. I love the TV but one thing

does bug me. The protective screen in front of the tube

is so glossy and reflective that ANY light in my room reflects back from

the protective screen. Basically it's alomost like looking at a

mirror image of the room with a movie playing behind it.

Has anyone dealt with this? Has anyone contacted Pioneer to see

if they have a less-reflective protective screen that can be used

instead? If not, does anyone sell a less-reflective protective screen?


When I received the TV I turned it on knowing that my room was

going to be an issue because the room it is placed in is not optimal for

a RPTV as it is our main family room and most-times there is

room lighting. It is NOT a viewing room (unless it's night-time and I

turn-off all of the lights in the room). But when I first looked at the

TV, without the protective screen in place yet, I was happy because the

image was clear and bright enough for the room even in daylight. Then

I placed the protective screen on the TV. Yuck. Immediately the

room light was reflected back in my face, the TV image was very

much impacted by the room's reflection on the protective screen.


I am debating removing the protective screen but I'm pretty

sure my 2 yr. old will crack the screen trying to be Manny Ramirez

or something. Has anyone gone without a protective screen?

There are obvious cons to doing this but does anyone have an

opinion on how easy it is to damage the real screen?


Thanks,


-Ed
 

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I have had the protective screen my earlier Pioneer Elite for about 7 years. No problem. But I do not have young children. The screen is soft plastic and will scratch very easily. No touchy and you won't hurt it. It can be dusted. Dirty or greasy hands on it and you could clean it without hurtig it I think with warm water and going vertical (up and down). Just don't scratch it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Mark,


I went and did a web search for "RPTV protective screen" and here's

what one of the hits had to say. The webpage is a review of the

Pioneer 610HD RPTV:


From http://www.laaudiofile.com/pro610hd.html


"The PRO-610HD also comes with a smoked gray acrylic screen protector. This is useful if you have small children since the non-protected screen is easily scratched. However, the screen cover lowers the light output and reflects ambient light, and therefore, is not recommended for optimal viewing. "


So that describes my dilemma a little more clearly. I'm still looking for

a protective screen that is not "smoky gray" so that it doesn't lower the

light output and hopefully reflects less ambient light. I can't see going

without something as my 2 yr old will certainly scratch it at some

point.


-Ed
 

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That's a tough call. Personally, I taught my daughter never to touch or go near the TV from the time she could walk. They can learn this behavior just like anything else. If you can teach them not to stick an object in the outlet then you can teach them not to go near or touch the TV screen.


The cost to replace the lenticular screen is about $250 shipped for the part, not including labor to install. You could install it yourself. Pioneer Elites are very easy to remove and replace screens, as you probably have learned.


Good Luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks 4cinema,


Yeah, my kids know that they are not to touch the TV. I already

freak on them if they touch it WITH the acrylic protective screen

on. But with the 2 yr old, and 2 8 yr olds, and all of their friends

accidents are my fear - not permissiveness of the parents.


Either way, $250.00 is not that bad. Now you mentioned that

the $250.00 is just the cost of the screen not any labor.

I'm not sure I would know how to replace the screen myself.

You alluded to it being easy to remove and replace them and that

I already probably knew that. I know that it is easy to replace

the acrylic protective screen. But I have no idea what is involved

with replacing the real screen if it get's scratched. Is it as simple as

a couple of screws, etc. It also is huge, right? I admit I

don't know very much about RPTV. So the lenticular screen is

similar in thickness and ease of replacement as the acrylic

protective screen?


-Ed
 

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I have the 510, and with a one year old just learning to walk, the screen must stay on. But, IMO, the picture with the screen OFF is equally compromised by ambient light. Ambient light washes out the image, due to the lenticular screen being white. It's really a lose-lose proposition, in a family room situation (where light cannot be controlled). Even with the reflections and reduced light output, I think I prefer the image with the screen ON.


I wonder if there is some company out there that could spray an anti-glare coating on the screen. The Sony RP HDTVs seem to have something like this on them.

Also, you could build spacers that would tip the top of the screen outward, to direct reflections downward. I've been thinking of playing with this.


Removing the protective screen is very simple. Check the owner's manual. It's a few screws under the top and bottom plastic channels- that's it.


Todd
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Todd,


I appreciate your opinions. I have no problem removing the

protective screen. That's easy enough. My question was in

how easy it is to replace the lenticular screen if it becomes

damaged. I just called Pioneer. They said that is about $400.00

for replacement of the screen ($250 parts / $150 labor). They said

that while possible for a novice to change the lenticular screen it is

tricky becuase you have to "remove the fresnel" and use gloves to

not stain the screen. You also need to make sure dust stays out of the

area. Yuck. I'd end up spending the $400.00 if mine ever was damaged.

I asked Pioneer if there was a less-reflective alternative for the

protective screen. They said no. All of this considered, and knowing

my aspiring sports and dancing kids in my house all of the

preaching and discipline in the world will not stop them from

accidentally banging into the screen. Cripes my two yr. old

is always bumping it or leaning on it trying to reach up top for

something. Yes, I discipline but then 2 months later he tries

something else for another reason or another. I think I will keep the

protective screen on until the little one is about 8. That's about

6 years. By then I'll be on to a plasma hopefully and all of these

concerns jack up a bit. I am still hopeful to find someone with an

acrylic piece that is not highly reflective. Maybe I should look at

a place that sells acrylic....


-Ed
 

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Ed,


I also have a PRO610HD and have had the TV apart, not because it broke, but because my edge focus was a little off and the mechanical focus needed adjusting. Anyway, I would not recommend the replacement of the lenticular to a layman. The fresnel and the lenticular are sandwitched together and it is extremely easy to get dust or lint between them. Also, once the lenticular and fresnel are off, the mirror and CRT's are exposed so you definitely want to keep the dust to a minimum. If you do decide to try to replace the lenticular yourself, if or when it becomes necessary, it will be more than just a few screws, but not quite rocket science. 1st, remove the speaker cover (it should pop off). 2nd, on either side of the flip-down door, there's a trim piece about 12-14" long, remove it by pulling straight out. Once removed, some screws holding the black frame around the screen in place will be exposed. They need to be removed (I forget how many screws). Once the screws are out, the frame around the screen needs to be pushed up and it will pop off the face of the TV. Once the fram is off, you will see the brackets holding the lenticular and fresnel assembly in place. Replace the broken or scratched screen and re-assemble. Once again, I must point out that even though this isn't rocket science, I would recommend it to the layman.


Rob
 

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Oops.


I meant to say that I would NOT recommend it to the layman.


Rob
 

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Is there any way to put up a sort of 'fence' around the tv that would keep the kids out? There's also the famous remote controlled electric dog collar that was mentioned over on the Spot some time back. :) JR
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Talons55,


That's a very helpful description of the steps neccessary to

change the lenticular. I do not think I will be so inclined to

do the work. I'm prety sure it would be well worth the extra $150.00

to have someone else do it. They know what they are doing more

than I and if something breaks they will have to cover it.


As for now though I will continue to search for an alternative

acrylic protective screen. My hope is to find one less dark and less

reflective of ambient light.


-Ed


P.S. Fence around the TV. I like that one...
 

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Life is always full of compromises! Live with the screen. You will get used to it and it does provide a benefit if sunlight hits the screen. Without it in such a situation, the picture will wash out. We keep the screens on in the store but recommend not installing them in adult households without big dogs if the room is light controlled. Keeping it on is not a real big compromise. You have a great set with or without it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Zignif!


That thread is awesome. I wish that discussion list didn't

charge membership. I'm curious if anyone on this list

with a Pioneer 610HD has replaced their acrylic protective screen with

a non-glare acrylic screen? I'm curious what the exact dimensions for the

screen is. I know I have a 58" TV. I'd rather not have to take the screen

off to find out. I'll try Pioneer if nobody knows.


-Ed
 
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