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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,


My REL Strata sub is popping at low frequencies. I called the USA importer for REL, and they said right away it's a bad resistor. They seemed to know right away, so I assume its a fairly common problem.


Anyway, I don't mind have a go at things myself, I called them and asked them if I could perhaps buy the resistors and fit them myself. However they were a little reluctant to sell me the parts, or guide me in the right direction.


However, it's still worth a shot, since two days ago I was researching a replacment instead of doing a DIY fix.


I'm fine with a soldering iron, all I need to work out is what part / s are at fault. However I am not an expert, and TBH I don't really know how to test


AFAIK when a resistor is gone it is typically a catastrohpic failure.


Looking at my board I can see, what looks like to be 2 darkened at the end, resistors. All I need to figure out, is a.\\ how do i know what is their exact type so that I can replace, & b.\\ Where do i get them from?


If you are an electronics expert, can you offer any advice?


Thanks




Here are the only two darkened resistors. Do they look burned to you? Or just colored that way?




Here is a better res pic of what I think is the problem.

 

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Those aren't resistors, they look like glass diodes. A resistor will typically have colored bands to tell you the value and tolerance, or state it in writing on the side. A diode is a one way device, and will have a marking on one end to show the orientation. Best to leave the repair to professionals, it's rare that you will look at a circuit board and the damaged component will jump up and say "Here I am, replace me"!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by floridapoolboy /forum/post/20883075


Those aren't resistors, they look like glass diodes. A resistor will typically have colored bands to tell you the value and tolerance, or state it in writing on the side. A diode is a one way device, and will have a marking on one end to show the orientation. Best to leave the repair to professionals, it's rare that you will look at a circuit board and the damaged component will jump up and say "Here I am, replace me"!

Yes I think you're right. I guess I have two choices here.


1.\\ Leave this to the professionals.


Or 2.\\ I could just say hell with that and put the $200 that its going to cost to repair towards an HSU STF-2, which will only be $390.


What would you do?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by thedoc46 /forum/post/20883105


What would you do?

I'm fine with soldering irons too so I would call them back and try to find out which resistor it is that needs to be replaced. If they won't tell you, start Googling around to see if anyone else knows which resistor it is.


Sounds like an easy fix if it's just a damaged resistor. (You should always try the easiest things first) If it's actually burnt, get a higher power replacement so it won't happen again.
 

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Does "fine with a soldering iron" mean you have a decent iron and can do PCB rework? I'm going to sound harsh, but if you do not know the difference between a diode and a resistor, you might want to think about it... It is easy to overheat and destroy something else, or lift a trace on the board and then you'll have more reqork to do.


Most manufacturers are reluctant to share design details and worry about liability if a customer rework goes bad. I could also tell horror stories, e.g. of trying to help someone replace a fuse, only to get yelled at because I did not tell him to unplug the unit first and he got shocked... Yes, I should have mentioned that little detail, but sometimes geeks take things for granted and leave out what is obvious to us and a mystery to others.


Still think the guy should have known to unplug it, mumble mumble... - Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonH50 /forum/post/20885422


Does "fine with a soldering iron" mean you have a decent iron and can do PCB rework? I'm going to sound harsh, but if you do not know the difference between a diode and a resistor, you might want to think about it... It is easy to overheat and destroy something else, or lift a trace on the board and then you'll have more reqork to do.


Most manufacturers are reluctant to share design details and worry about liability if a customer rework goes bad. I could also tell horror stories, e.g. of trying to help someone replace a fuse, only to get yelled at because I did not tell him to unplug the unit first and he got shocked... Yes, I should have mentioned that little detail, but sometimes geeks take things for granted and leave out what is obvious to us and a mystery to others.


Still think the guy should have known to unplug it, mumble mumble... - Don

Fine with a soldering iron means I can follow instructions. No I don't know the difference between a diode and a resistor. There's really no need this day and age, unless you are into electronics. If there was an obvious burn and i was told what to replace it with, i don't think for one second, i will not have been able to do so. I've done modding before on pcb boards, but only under instruction of what to mod.


Eitherway, it makes no difference now, since i was unable to establish the culprit, the board is now on it's way to a professional for repair.
 
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