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i have a pretty interesting way of solving a problem, i think. i searched but i haven't found anyone that's done this before.

my parents have a Bose lifestyle 5.1 all inclusive system. yeah it sounds horrible but hey, it is 5.1. in their defense they did get the whole system at cost, and the room it's in has horrible acoustics so a real system wouldn't be worth the trouble anyway.

but - if you can believe it - the receiver sucks even harder than the speakers, so i want to buy them a real one. the problem is since they've bought into the crappy bose ecosystem, everything is proprietary and i don't have the money, time, or patience to replace everything. therefore i want to keep the Bose speakers at the least, and hopefully the sub as well.

the receiver connects to the subwoofer - and only the subwoofer, it doesn't connect to the speakers directly - by a proprietary "Bose Link" cable. i'm pretty sure it's just a standard mini DIN 7- or 9-pin cable, with some nonstandard pinout and $100 pricetag no doubt. each speaker is then wired through the wall to the subwoofer through a two-wire cable that ends in an RCA plug which goes to the subwoofer, and then passes through subwoofer and then through the bose link cable to the receiver.

what i want to do is hack off those RCA plugs and then plug the speaker wire directly into the new receiver. is this possible? the negative of the speaker wire should be connected to the outer ring part of the RCA plug, and the positive should be connected to the center pin, so it should be pretty easy to remove the plugs and label the wire + and - myself and run that to the new receiver. copper is copper, so this should work at least in theory, no?

and if this is true, then the same should be possible of the sub and its bose link connector. i do have a multimeter but i don't know how it works. can i somehow connect that to the bose link connector wiring while the system is powered on, and find the sub pos and neg with the multimeter? or can i just use a 3.5mm to RCA cable to output music from my phone and test it by connecting the copper from the bose link cable directly to the RCA output? (the center pin of RCA should go to pos, and outer ring should go to neg. to find pos and neg i can try switching the copper cable from pin to pin and back and forth from RCA ground and pin. shouldn't take too long, but does this risk damaging the sub? especially since it won't be through a crossover, will the sub be trying to produce high frequency sound and blow itself up?

all of this is assuming, of course, that a standard mini DIN to RCA cable doesn't work. i'm going to order one of those and try it next week.
 

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You're better off selling the complete Bose system on Craigslist and starting from scratch.
Agreed, start over since other receivers may not have the crossover settings and whatnot built in for tiny satellite speakers. Stick with Bose receiver and drop the whole kit and move on.

If your parents are like mine, they don't give a crap about the acoustics details one way or another and it's not worth changing anything...
 

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i have a pretty interesting way of solving a problem, i think. i searched but i haven't found anyone that's done this before.

my parents have a Bose lifestyle 5.1 all inclusive system. yeah it sounds horrible but hey, it is 5.1. in their defense they did get the whole system at cost, and the room it's in has horrible acoustics so a real system wouldn't be worth the trouble anyway.

but - if you can believe it - the receiver sucks even harder than the speakers, so i want to buy them a real one. the problem is since they've bought into the crappy bose ecosystem, everything is proprietary and i don't have the money, time, or patience to replace everything. therefore i want to keep the Bose speakers at the least, and hopefully the sub as well.

the receiver connects to the subwoofer - and only the subwoofer, it doesn't connect to the speakers directly - by a proprietary "Bose Link" cable. i'm pretty sure it's just a standard mini DIN 7- or 9-pin cable, with some nonstandard pinout and $100 pricetag no doubt. each speaker is then wired through the wall to the subwoofer through a two-wire cable that ends in an RCA plug which goes to the subwoofer, and then passes through subwoofer and then through the bose link cable to the receiver.

what i want to do is hack off those RCA plugs and then plug the speaker wire directly into the new receiver. is this possible? the negative of the speaker wire should be connected to the outer ring part of the RCA plug, and the positive should be connected to the center pin, so it should be pretty easy to remove the plugs and label the wire + and - myself and run that to the new receiver. copper is copper, so this should work at least in theory, no?

and if this is true, then the same should be possible of the sub and its bose link connector. i do have a multimeter but i don't know how it works. can i somehow connect that to the bose link connector wiring while the system is powered on, and find the sub pos and neg with the multimeter? or can i just use a 3.5mm to RCA cable to output music from my phone and test it by connecting the copper from the bose link cable directly to the RCA output? (the center pin of RCA should go to pos, and outer ring should go to neg. to find pos and neg i can try switching the copper cable from pin to pin and back and forth from RCA ground and pin. shouldn't take too long, but does this risk damaging the sub? especially since it won't be through a crossover, will the sub be trying to produce high frequency sound and blow itself up?

all of this is assuming, of course, that a standard mini DIN to RCA cable doesn't work. i'm going to order one of those and try it next week.
Scrap it all and start from scratch.

A relatively inexpensive 2-channel system will probably meet their needs well and sound 500% better.
 
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