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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How easy would it be to replace/upgrade the phono cables that came stock on a turntable ? They're really flimsy, cheap spagetti-style RCA cables that are connected/hard-wired somewhere inside the base. Not wanting to get into a boutique argument, but the stuff that comes with equipment, whether it is on a turntable from the 70's or that brand new Blu Ray player you just picked up BB are junk and not well-made.



Bill
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by storman /forum/post/17036803


How easy would it be to replace/upgrade the phono cables that came stock on a turntable ? They're really flimsy, cheap spagetti-style RCA cables that are connected/hard-wired somewhere inside the base. Not wanting to get into a boutique argument, but the stuff that comes with equipment, whether it is on a turntable from the 70's or that brand new Blu Ray player you just picked up BB are junk and not well-made.



Bill

I don't know the answer to your question. You haven't even stated what the turntable is.


However, I will point out that unless the connectors are bad, in other words, unless the signal comes and goes when you move a wire, there's nothing to be gained by replacing them. And you can prove that for yourself if your amp has a proper tape monitor loop, and you have a cheap phono cable.


Plug the cheapest skinniest cable you have into the tape outs and then to the tape ins. Now switch the tape monitor in and out of the circuit. On most good preamps, you'll hear no difference. The reason you'll hear no difference is that the cable isn't degrading the sound.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have a Dual CS 704 that was purchased in '77. Other concerns I have is the cable length. The existing ones might not be long enough when I put it on a slide-out rackshelf in my equipment rack. Once the shelf is fully extended so that I can lift the dust cover and put on an LP, the cables may no longer reach.


Twitch - there might be a DIN connection inside the base of the table. The cables terminate somewhere inside. Whether that is easily accessible, I don't know.


Bill
 

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The RCA cables probably have RCAs males on the TT end as well. I worked on Dual TTs in the early 70s and none at DIN connectors at that point. They did have a dual chassis mount RCAs female on the underside of the base mechanism.


Radio Shack cables will work quite nicely. There have been dozens of multi page posts regarding cables. Nobody has successfully proven that the vast majority of Big Box store cables or Rad Shack are electrically inferior at audio frequencies. Save your bucks and head to the Shack.


REALLY cheap Chinese made cables do have a wider spread between the strands in the braided shield and sometime go microphonic. This is where you can actually hear noise in the system as you run your fingers down the cables.


The cables most capable of preventing this use a braided shield as opposed to a spiral wrapped shield. Spiral shields separate as the cable is flexed and that leaves ares of the center conductor more exposed than others.


Rad Shack cables will work fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the reply. I'll check some night on the underside of the chassis. Seemed like there was a removable plate where the cables exited.

Believe me, I do not go in for the high priced cables. I can't believe anyone would pay $300, $500 or over $1000 for a pair of 2 meter cables. That's insane. I've been pleased of late with the quality of cables I've bought from Blue Jeans - good Beldon wire and Canare plugs and they don't cost a fortune.


I may have new worry - I was playing an LP this evening and the left channel cut in and out several times. So there might be a loose connection somewhere in the chain on the TT - stylus, stylus wiring to the tonearm, or what ? The rest of my system is good - an immediate switch to my receiver's tune confirmed the rest of the playback system was working fine.


Bill
 

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Check the RCAs first. Sometimes oxidation can build up sufficiently to create poor connections. It is also possible that the tone arm leads themselves MAY be damaged. Usually what has happened though, is that the leads soldered to the little push-on clips that connect to the cartridge may be broken and/or fractured.


To solder these you need a small tipped iron and you must remove the clip from the terminal pin on the cartridge. Obviously these wires are very small and delicate so be very gentle. You could also have an intermittent in the cartridge it self. Hopefully it is just the RCA cables.
 

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anyone know if you can replace the cable on a marantz tt-15s1--it looks like it travels through the body and into the tonearm and then very tiny wires emanate from the end of the tonearm to connect to the cartridge--just curious--sometimes I wonder if one of the connectors on the cartridge end may be coming loose
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by storman /forum/post/17046929


I may have new worry - I was playing an LP this evening and the left channel cut in and out several times. So there might be a loose connection somewhere in the chain on the TT - stylus, stylus wiring to the tonearm, or what ? Bill

As 'Gizmo' said check all mech connections (starting at the easy end first) to be sure, if not there report back ..............
 

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You can remove the connectors from the cartridge if you are very very careful and use the right needlenose pliers. You should use the smallest pliers you have or can get as the smaller ones will allow you feel when the connector gives way.


The connectors are usually tiny gold flashed and sort of tubular. Due to metal fatigue they can loosen the clamping around the cartridge terminals.


All you need to do is to slowly and carefully grasp the connector close to the wire connection end but NOT THE WIRE ITSELF and gently pull it free of the cartridge pin. Keep in mind there is very little slack in the lead wires inside the tone arm and cartridge head.


Once free, SLIGHTLY compress the connector's sides but do not flatten it. It just takes a little compression to make a tight contact.


Do the contacts one at a time so you keep them properly connected.


Should be good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the advice. You sound like a man of great skills which I'd love to aspire to but which I sadly fear I lack. I would cause more damage than fix. If it really becomes necessary to do this, I know an old friend of the family that may still have the skills to do this and would gladly help me out.


On a related note, I attempted to remove the hatch cover on the underside of the chassis where the cables, ground wire, and power cord enter/exit. I thought it would be easy to remove, but it seems as though by moving it the cables were being tugged at, as though they were somehow connected to it. With no experience or repair manual to guide me, I stopped for fear I could make matters worse. I connected it back into my system and listened to about an hour's worth of music without any problems. Right now it seems to working fine, so I'd better leave well enough alone. I don't really have a lot a spare cash right now to pay for repairs or a new cartridge, as this is not my primary playback device.
 
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