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Hello all.. I'm trying to figure out the difference in what exact resolutions are for 1080i, 720p, and so on. For instance I am looking at a TV that says it is 1200x1080i.


Also, this TV says it is digital, but not High Definition, yet it says 1080i?
http://www2.consumer.philips.com/glo...Id=30PW9815_37


Any help is much appreciated.




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The full format for 1080i is 1920 x 1080. So the Philips is not capable of displaying all the pixels in the format.


What you should know is that except for a few expensive CRT projectors, no consumer HDTV's can do full 1080i x 1920 and the acquisition equipment (cameras, VTRs) used at this time is not capable of full format resolution either. Most consumer HDTV's will do somewhere in the range of 1080i x 1500-1200 pixels, some a few more, some a few less.


The specs for this set say it will display 1080i HDTV signals via component video input, it's formal term would be an HDTV monitor. I haven't seen one of these, so I can't speak to it's performance. You may want to do a search, try Philips for starters.


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Yeah - many TVs which say "High Definition" will accept a high defintion signal (e.g. 1920x1080) but lack the display clarity to really show all of the detail.


To further confuse things, many shows don't really provide detail up to the full 1080i spec so even with a full resoltion 1920x1080 display much of what you would end up watching would look like less.


Most of the displays you buy today are lucky to get to 1280x720 displayable resolution. If you could get something that showed 1600x900 worth of the 1080i signal you would be doing really well.


I think we are "stuck" with most displays at around 1280x720

and the best "content" around 1440x800 (or so).


Since 1920x1080 is a bit out of reach today, I hope the hardware manufactuers at least push for a better standard in

the next few years. Perhaps 1600x900 should be the resolution goal for new HD-CAMs and consumer HDTV display devices (until the day the real 1920x1080 can be done at a reasonable cost).
 

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Also, keep in mind that because of filtering and other factors HDTVs aren't expected to display full 1920X1080 or 1280X720 resolutions. Some actual measurements made prior to FCC approval of the HDTV standard are summarized here . Philips claims my year-old 64PH9905 RPTV really can display 'full' 1080i images. The set has 9-in. CRTs, 35-MHz bandwidth (-3 dB), and a 0.51mm-pitch 56-in-wide (64-in. diagonal) lenticular screen. Whether it really can display full (filtered-resolution) 1080i awaits a suitable test pattern.


(BTW, the forums FAQ UBB Code section describes how to shorten too-long hyperlinks, as I've done here, so readers don't have to scroll horizontally. That is, 'long' links stretch the text beyond the margins, and can be corrected with editing.)-- John




[This message has been edited by John Mason (edited 09-01-2001).]
 
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