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JDMP10, do some more research on these forums to find out why Sharp has dropped to the level of a second tier manufacturer. Their products have countless problems, with the most notable being banding. Also, Sharp response time while measuring the lowest is actually worse then a Samsung 8ms panel. I've tested the response on the Sharp and Samsung as have a few others on this board and the Samsung had the better response time.
 

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Keen is just confused
Almost all current console games run at around 30 frames, and thats because the developer needs to make a choice as to weather have very detailed graphics or a faster framerate and most of them go with better graphics. Every game could run at 60fps, but then the games would not look so pretty. I like me some pretty graphics.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by conan48 /forum/post/0


Keen is just confused
Almost all current console games run at around 30 frames, and thats because the developer needs to make a choice as to weather have very detailed graphics or a faster framerate and most of them go with better graphics. Every game could run at 60fps, but then the games would not look so pretty. I like me some pretty graphics.

It depends on whether you like looking at screenshots or fluid gameplay.






There is a considerable amount of confusion around the various rates and response times. Perhaps I'll take a shot at enumerating and explaining all the ones I've seen mentioned in this thread:
  • Game framerate (usually 30 fps, sometimes 60 fps): How frequently the game draws a new image for you to see.
  • Refresh rate (60 Hz for most TVs): How frequently some or all of the image is made visible on the display. Note that the individual frames of a game may re-displayed multiple times.
  • Response lag: the signal to a display or speakers takes time to get through the various layers of processing involved in modern consumer electronics. Typically audio equipment has less of a delay and so has to provide the ability to add delay to the audio so that it looks in sync with the video. Some games also need to know how long it takes to get content to the screen because they are very timing sensitive.
  • LCD response time (2-16 ms typically) is how long it takes the screen to physically change to a new image. When its time to refresh the screen, the image can't be changed instantenously, there is a physical process that must happen so that different colour light can be made to start coming out of the display.
  • Network latency during a game is unrelated to the display, but depending on how the game works its effect may be cumulative with the response lag of your A/V system, leading to a more noticeable experience. This typically comes across as a delay in all your actions in the game.


Different people are sensitive to these effects in different ways (just like some people see the DLP rainbow effect, but most don't). Manufacturers, even the reputable ones, are often making design trade-offs in their products that positively or negatively impact these factors and it is very hard to be sure how a given product will do by looking at a spec sheet. As advised above, go look at the set you are considering and try to look at the content you are about most. And if you're giving opinions, please be specific about which device(s) you are talking about -- the technology is changing fast and it isn't a good idea to over-generalize.
 

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?


Most game consoles from the 6th generation and on have shifted to actually running games at 60 fields per second (or 60 frames per second in progressive scan). As for whether or not developers do that depends on their game. A good number of games that emphasize smooth, fluid animation run at 60 "frames" per second. As far as examples, Super Smash Bros. Melee, F-Zero GX, Soul Calibur II/III, pretty much any reputable fighting/racing game, God of War series... and their graphics look plenty good. There's honestly lots of recent (good) games that apply, certainly over a 1:9 ratio.


As far as the 7th generation of consoles is concerned, achieving 60 fps framerates is a non-issue if developers take the time to properly code their games. That is, until those games are ported to the PAL region.
 

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I have uploaded a scan of an interesting article that was on page 30 of the July issue of Home Theater magazine. It may work as therapy for some who think response time is the end all, motion blur benchmark.

Article


Quote from article:

"But here's the real kick: Even if an LCD had a response time of 0 ms, it would still have motion blur."
 

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Thanks for the article Brent. Very informative. I think that the strobing will be the end of motion blur as from everything I have read. It's too bad Philips is not going to be making their Clear LCDs no more, as they were to expensive to produce. They should sell their tech to other companies.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by RyokoYaksa /forum/post/0


?


Most game consoles from the 6th generation and on have shifted to actually running games at 60 fields per second (or 60 frames per second in progressive scan). As for whether or not developers do that depends on their game. A good number of games that emphasize smooth, fluid animation run at 60 "frames" per second. As far as examples, Super Smash Bros. Melee, F-Zero GX, Soul Calibur II/III, pretty much any reputable fighting/racing game, God of War series... and their graphics look plenty good. There's honestly lots of recent (good) games that apply, certainly over a 1:9 ratio.


As far as the 7th generation of consoles is concerned, achieving 60 fps framerates is a non-issue if developers take the time to properly code their games. That is, until those games are ported to the PAL region.


Actually, most games do not run 60 frames per second. Perhaps a handful of the games you choose to play, but the majority of games will always run at 30 frames a second.


Just look at Gears of War: Best-looking/playing game to date, and it runs locked at 30 frames a second. No matter what the technology, developers will always have to choose visuals over performance. And just like Epic said [paraphrased], "we could have gotten Gears at 60, in fact we did, but then we pushed the visuals to get 30."


I used to feel that if a game didn't run at 60 frames then it was a piece of turd, but after Cliffy's statement, I had a complete 180. The goal is to get DOWN to 30, not up to 60; because, when you start work on a game, you are already at 60.


So, in conclusion, 90% of all known videogames run at 30 frames a second. hehehehehehe =]
 

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People are getting confused here. Let me try and explain in the simplest way possible.


ALL games are output at 60hz to the TV. NOT 60 FPS, but 60hz. This is a standard that ALL tv's accept. 60hz just means that the signal being sent to your TV is being refreshed 60 times per second. In Europe they use 50hz. This has nothing to do with the framerate. Games like GOW are running at 30FPS and the signal is being sent at 60hz to the TV. Your TV is getting 60hz signal but the game is only running at 30fps. Anyone need any further clarification?
 
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