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I'm installing a Clearstream 2V and I have a question about hooking it up. I have done some research on getting the best cable, but I think in getting into the territory of overkill. I got as far as knowing to look for some Belden RG6 tri-shield but I have no idea where to look for it, what connectors to use or if it's better than the quad shield. I'm probably going to need about 60 feet or so. No more than 100'. I'm going to run it to two different TVs of that's needed info.


Any help you guys can give is much appreciated!
 

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That's unnecessary overkill. You don't need the "best" cable, you need "good enough" cable.


A good quality standard shield RG6 coax is all you need. You do NOT need quad shield although you can use it.


You can buy it at any store that has an electronics or electrical department . Walmart, Kmart, Sears, Best Buy, Target, Radio Shack, Lowes, Home Despot, Menards, neighborhood hardware store, etc are all places where you can buy pre-assembled coax.
 

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The purpose of the additional shielding in tri and quad shielded cables is to prevent outside signals from getting into your system. Since you're using an antenna, outside signals in your system is exactly what you do want.


An interesting side-note: Many years ago I saw a paper that said to use coax for CATV and twisted-pair wire for antenna. I thought that was very interesting.
 

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I WOULD suggest Quad Shield, if you are very close to the transmitters, since ingress of the signal along the line could "blur" the reception of the RF signal ("eye pattern", as the digital folks call it). That's due to the propagation delay of the cable being only about 2/3 the speed of the signal in the air. It's even more important, though, to keep the connections clean and tight. Ingress is going to be more of a problem as you get further from the antenna...down where you have splitters and such, since the difference between the antenna-signal and the delayed in-the-cable signal become greater with distance. It's often a real problem near places like Sutro Tower in San Francisco.

Not likely to be a problem in SLC.


The other place where QS might be important is, where the cable is located near transformers, motors or other electrical devices, that might have strong magnetic fields. Moving the cable away from them is cheaper, though
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by egnlsn  /t/1524185/rg6-questions-for-antenna-install/0_60#post_24526690


An interesting side-note: Many years ago I saw a paper that said to use coax for CATV and twisted-pair wire for antenna. I thought that was very interesting.

Many years ago most TV’s and antennas were 300Ω terminals only so we used 300Ω twin lead wire with stand-offs and twisted the wire for better CMRR. I used to see 300Ω open wire feeders used in the mountainous regions because you could use very long runs with low loss (much lower than coax, 6/59).
 

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I just ran inexpensive RG-6 (it wasn't Belden and it wasn't quad) underneath the eaves of my house from the antenna to the garage when the signal booster is. A little over 100'. From the signal booster it went to a 3-way splitter and off to the house using the existing RG-56 cabling. Works perfectly.
 

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I went through a 500' spool of plain old RG6 in a little over year (4 homes) a few years ago.

No problems... no complaints. All I can agree with is using good tools, good connectors and taking your time.

(and if outdoors, always make a "drip loop".)
 

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RG-59 (cheap stuff)
Signal Loss (Attenuation) in Decibels per 100 ft.
  • Loss at 50 MHz: 3.3 dB
  • Loss at 100 MHz: 4.9 dB
  • Loss at 400 MHz: 11.2dB
  • Loss at 900 MHz: 20.1 dB
  • Loss at 1000 MHz: 21.5 dB

 
RG-6 (better)
Signal Loss (Attenuation) in Decibels per 100 ft.
  • Loss at 50 MHz: 1.5 dB
  • Loss at 100 MHz: 2.0 dB
  • Loss at 400 MHz: 4.3 dB
  • Loss at 900 MHz: 6.8 dB
  • Loss at 1000 MHz: 7.0 dB

 

As you can see the reduction in losses can be rather significant if run lengths are long.
 

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Whatever works...

Either way, the attenuation using RG59 is not as dire as indicated in post #8.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman  /t/1524185/rg6-questions-for-antenna-install#post_24565216


Whatever works...

Either way, the attenuation using RG59 is not as dire as indicated in post #8.
Agreed ;-)
 

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Didn't say where the so-called "specs" for the above RG-59 (cheap stuff) came from.....must be a mistake...


Actual MIL-SPEC RG-59 is probably found in old installations...which has a solid plastic (PE) interior insulation, like old Belden 9402:
http://www.alliedelec.com/images/products/datasheets/bm/BELDEN_WIRE_AND_CABLE/70004414.pdf


Most modern "RG-59" coax cables are NOT built according to the M17/29-RG59 MIL-SPEC, replacing PE with a lower loss FOAM dielectric and might even add a more effective aluminized mylar shield....looking more and more like RG-6 type construction:
http://www.belden.com/pdfs/03Belden_Master_Catalog/06Coaxial_Cables/06.34_39.pdf
http://www.pacificcabling.com/Wire_Cable/Coaxial%20Cable/Non%20Plenum/RG59U.htm#RG59B
http://www.pacificcabling.com/Wire_Cable/Coaxial%20Cable/Non%20Plenum/RG6U.htm#RG6


Performance at 700 MHz (Ch51) was not listed in the above post but can be found in the above spec sheets. MIL-SPEC RG-59 typically has 9.7 dB/100-ft loss at 700 MHz and only 11.1/100-ft dB (NOT 20.1/100-ft dB) loss at 900 MHz. And NON-MIL-SPEC RG-59 can have considerably lower loss, comparable to some RG-6 cables, which can range from 5.3-8.1 dB/100-ft at 700 MHz for different Belden Coax cables. IT ALL DEPENDS ON THE PART NUMBER.....


PS: You have to be more careful with FOAM Dielectric cables, esp installing when HOT....the inner wire can MELT into the Foam if mis-handled.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by holl_ands  /t/1524185/rg6-questions-for-antenna-install#post_24568642


Didn't say where the so-called "specs" for the above RG-59 (cheap stuff) came from.....must be a mistake...
Yes... I think that's been noted.


OTOH... in most cases, Plain old RG6 will suffice. No need for tri-shield, quad-shield or a Faraday shield.
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman  /t/1524185/rg6-questions-for-antenna-install/0_60#post_24569055


Plain old RG6 will suffice. No need for tri-shield, quad-shield or a Faraday shield.

I agree, for most RF work in residential use, just make sure it is a foam type. Use/used Comscope 5729 for all my personal RF use.


I use/used Belden 1694A and Belden 1505A for HD component video (hardly ever used anymore). Used these two at work for all HD-SDI (1.5 Gbps) wiring. These Belden types cost considerably more than similar cables with aluminum braid.
 
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