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I just bought the Zenith HDV420 to use with my 480P Fujitsu 4203 Plasma. What is the optimal connection?


I would prefer using the RGB hookup, so I don't need to run my DVD through my receiver, but don't want to degrade the picture to do it.
 

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RGB is the best connection since none of the signals are encoded.


On Y Pr Pb, the green component has to be decoded from the Pr and Pb signals. The horizontal and vertical sync signals are both caried in the Y (luminance) signal.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Bob Dycus
RGB is the best connection since none of the signals are encoded.


On Y Pr Pb, the green component has to be decoded from the Pr and Pb signals. The horizontal and vertical sync signals are both caried in the Y (luminance) signal.
It's just a question of where the decoding is done, however. The broadcast signals are component, so if you use an RGB connection from box to display, you're just doing the component-to-RGB conversion in the STB instead of in the display.
 

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OTA HD signals use MPEG-2 compression which uses YUV color space not RGB. RGB YUV color space conversion is done several times, since an HD video camera will start with RGB and it will get converted to YUV for MPEG2 compression. The STB or TV will then have to convert back to RGB for display. So it really doesn't matter since it gets converted back and forth anyway.
 

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In general RGB is a more forgiving signal standard, where black equals zero volts. For component signals, to get a completely black signal requires very good calibration because black is a mid-level voltage for the chroma channels, and any miscalibration for black cannot be crushed out as it can for RGB.
 

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YUV-RGB conversion (and vice-versa) is technically lossless ... no data is compromised between the two. In practice, errors can crop up, and the YUV format is a bit more fragile.


I'd let the conversion be done in your box and go RGB to the display for that reason.
 

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I am using the RGB output (sub D 15 pin connector) of a Sony SAT- 200HD DirecTV receiver into input 1 (sub D 15 pin connector) configured for RGB, on my Pioneer PDP 503CMX plasma display.


This works very well providing an excellent picture, but I was surprised to find that when I went into the Pioneer’s menu I could still adjust the color, tint and sharpness controls. I thought by using an RGB input parts color decoder was bypassed and therefore disabling the color, tint and sharpness controls. Is my understanding of RGB incorrect?


I believe if you use the RGB input on at least some of the Panasonic plasmas will lose access to the color, tint and sharpness controls. Which is the way I thought it would work on my Pioneer.


Inquiring minds want to know what’s up.


Thanks
 

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I use RGB on my DTV1080 to my Pioneer Elite PRO-620 and I cannot control the color, tint, or sharpness. I have compared both component and RGB both using Bettercables Silver Serpant and I found that the RGB gives a better more detailed picture. The colors are more accurate and it seems more crisp than component.
 

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Denali,

Are you sure you're not passing YUV out the VGA (sub D 15) connector? Sometimes it' easy to assume that it's RGB because of that connector, but it can just as easily carry YUV.


It's possible that your display is "doing the math" for you and simulating the color controls controls, but usually if you can make adjustments it's to the RGB components individually.
 

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joe12south,


The SAT 200HD manual refers to the (sub D 15) output as RGB and it is labeled RGB on the back of the unit. There are no options in the HD200’s menus to set it any other way.


I also rechecked the configuration of my Pioneer PDP 503CMX on the input used for the SAT 200HD (input #1) and it is definitely configured for RGB. When going into the 503’s integrator menu I also have access to the 6 high and low RGB settings for input #1.


I think this is a 503CMX "feature" and have Emailed Pioneer plasma tech support and am waiting for their reply.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Bob Dycus
I don't believe the broadcast signals are component. Can you offer some evidence to support your claim?
Yes, they absolutely are component (MPEG-2 compressed YUV). You'll find it described in section 5.2.5 (page 19) of this document: ATSC Standard Document .


Component has always been the basis of television broadcasting because it is much more efficient than RGB.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by adam8833
I use RGB on my DTV1080 to my Pioneer Elite PRO-620 and I cannot control the color, tint, or sharpness. I have compared both component and RGB both using Bettercables Silver Serpant and I found that the RGB gives a better more detailed picture. The colors are more accurate and it seems more crisp than component.
I think that would have to be the result of slight adjustment differences in the display in the two modes. The RGB is derived from the component signal, so it can't really be any better. You certainly are not going to gain detail.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by marthalamew0
Do they sell Monstor RGB cables or will any RGB cable result in the same picture?
The requirements for RGB cables are the same as for component: You need well-shielded, low-loss 75-ohm coax. It does not have to be anything exotic, however. There is nothing particularly special about Monster Cable.
 

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Quote:
The RGB is derived from the component signal, so it can't really be any better. You certainly are not going to gain detail.
This is correct but it's not always the case. This vastly depends on displays.

RGB signal in some displays doesn't go through certain processing/conversion circuitries and this sometimes opens up bandwidth quite a bit as well as bypassing unnecessary conversion/processing resulting in better picture.
 

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Denali:

Quote:
I think this is a 503CMX "feature" and have Emailed Pioneer plasma tech support and am waiting for their reply.
It’s the way the panel works so, if you want to call it a feature, fine. If you read the technical manual, it’s clearly stated that those RGB adjustments exist.


I've calibrated input 1 RGB on my 503 with ColorFacts and have been through every menu many times. I did all adjustments in Integrator Mode and left the standard menu settings at their default.


I do find that RGB is a bit sharper than component, but it’s probably not a fair comparison. My RGB input is from an NRS and component is from a satellite receiver.
 

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As one can tell from the above discussion, there is no clear answer to this question. I suggest to simply try both and go with the one that looks best, and this advice also applies to comparing analog HDTV connections (RGBHV, wide band component video) to digital connections (DVI) for use interfacing with an analog HDTV display.
 

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Ken -Would your comment ("no clear answer") be different for a digital HDTV display (e.g., digital projector)? If the OTA signal starts out as analog HDTV, does it matter if it gets converted to digital at the STB (using DVI) or at the projector? More specifically, for a Sony HS10 projector, is there some reason to think that a DVI connection from a Samsung 165 is going to be better than component from a Samsung 151 or RGB from a Zenith 420?
 

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Quote:
If the OTA signal starts out as analog HDTV, does it matter if it gets converted to digital at the STB (using DVI) or at the projector?
carlton, I'm wondering if I understand your question correctly ? :confused:

DVI-D, more specifically TMDS by Silicon Image carries uncompressed digital RGB signal.
 
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