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If you switch to tree mode in media info it shows what percentage of the file size is video so figuring the audio portion is easy enough it seems.

Bill
 

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I was quite curious myself on the 10GB claim as I never paid attention or gave any thought to the audio track/file size. Browsing over all my BD rips (which I own the discs) I found my largest concerning audio file size are...

Pirates Of The Caribbean: At World's End
Length: 2:48
Audio bitrate: 6912 kbps
LPCM 5.1 24bit 48Khz
Audio file size: 8.14GB

Chris Botti Live With Orchestra And Special Guests
Length: 1:29
Audio bitrate: 13824 kbps
LPCM 5.1 24bit 96kHz
Audio file size: 8.60GB
 

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If you switch to tree mode in media info it shows what percentage of the file size is video so figuring the audio portion is easy enough it seems.
Mmh, not on DTS, I see this only with AC3 tracks (Mediainfo 0.7.72)?

The German DTS-MA track of my LOTR 3 EE rip clocks at 5 GB (the whole movie being 75 GB).

Code:
Audio #1
ID                                       : 2
Format                                   : DTS
Format/Info                              : Digital Theater Systems
Format profile                           : MA / Core
Mode                                     : 16
Format settings, Endianness              : Big
Codec ID                                 : A_DTS
Duration                                 : 4h 23mn
Bit rate mode                            : Variable
Bit rate                                 : Unknown / 1 509 Kbps
Channel(s)                               : 7 channels / 6 channels
Channel positions                        : Front: L C R, Side: L R, Back: C, LFE / Front: L C R, Side: L R, LFE
Sampling rate                            : 48.0 KHz
Bit depth                                : 16 bits
Compression mode                         : Lossless / Lossy
Title                                    : de DTS-MA
Language                                 : German
Default                                  : Yes
Forced                                   : No
So why is the MA bitrate unknown?
 

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Further Testing to back up my statements

The heated debate/discussion that took place was with regard to DTS-HD MA and TrueHD tracks in Blu-rays and their average sizes when left unmolested. A general statement was made that I felt was not correct. I must admit that I never even thought about LPCM tracks found on early Blu-Rays. These were in fact quite large, however this was not what the heated discussion was about. In recent years DTS-HD MA and TrueHD have become the norm.

I had to really think about what titles actually had LPCM tracks as opposed to a DTS-HD MA or True HD track.
Pearl Harbor, Black Hawk Down, Rocky Balboa and Bruce Springsteen London Calling come to mind and their respective sizes are as follows: (These titles were de-muxed using the latest version of tsMuxer). I am sure that are quite a few more titles and other veteran rippers will chime in on the quest to find “Nessie”. ;) (A 10GB or larger DTS HD MA or TrueHD track)
Pearl Harbor – 8.84 GB - ~3 hours - ~2.94 GB/hr
Black Hawk Down – 4.46 GB- ~ 2 hours 30 minutes - ~1.78 GB/hr
Rocky Balboa – 3.72 GB- ~ 1 hour 41 minutes - ~2.24 GB/hr
Bruce Springsteen – London Calling - 8.33 GB - ~2 hours 52 minutes- 2.91 GB/hr

I also de-muxed the Godfather which has a TrueHD track and is nearly 3 hours in length as is Pearl Harbor and Guardians of the Galaxy 3D which has a DTS HD-MA Track to show a brief comparison of size between LPCM, TrueHD and DTS HD MA.
Godfather – 5.1 GB -~ 3 hours- ~ 1.7 GB/hr
Guardians of the Galaxy 3D – 3.89 GB ~2 hours 30 minutes- ~1.55 GB/hr

It seems that the average size per hour is as follows:
LPCM tracks: ~1.80-3.0 GB per hour.
True HD tracks: ~1.5 -1.7 GB per hour.
DTS HD MA tracks: ~ 1.5 – 1.7 GB per hour.

Most movies are approximately 1.5 to 2 hours in length. Based on this, the average size of a DTSHD MA or TrueHD track can range between 2.25- 3.4 GB. Give or take a few %. This is based on the few movies that I de-muxed this morning to get an idea of what I believe to be correct and accurate information. A LPCM track can be nearly double or even triple the size of a True HD or DTSHD-MA track.

For those with Atmos Setups:

John Wick- ~1 hour 40 minutes - 4.13 GB- ~2.36 GB/hr
Transformers 4- ~2 hours 45 minutes- 5.79 GB - ~2.10 GB/hr
TNMTs- ~ 1 hour 40 minutes - 4.37 GB- ~2.49 GB/hr
Expendables 3- ~2 hours 11 minutes - ~5.34 GB- ~ 2.44 Gb/hr

It seems that Atmos tracks are about 25-30% larger on average than TrueHD tracks.
 

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My Akira Disc uses Dolby TrueHD for the 192Khz and 96Khz tracks. No idea why the audio size is so large though. It's not even 24 bit. It's still 16 bit. AT least that is what the BDinfo program showed.
 

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So 4gb...ok, I looked at the few BD's I have for TV shows and it looks like they are averaging about twice that. So my questions is, what is you opinion of the viewing quality of those compressed shows. Would you say they are still better than an up-scaled version of a reg dvd but not as good as an uncompressed BD? I'm watching them on a 70in TV so I'm curious what quality drop, if any, I would see.
I posted a trio of pics a few pages back. Go view them on your TV and see if you can tell a difference. Now, those are just stills mind you. It looks a lot better when viewed in motion, as you are meant to see it.

I myself prefer to re-encode a high resolution source vs upscaling a low resolution source. Not only because it should produce a better picture, but I also think I could come up with better encoding parameters than the upscaling algorithm being used as a template for every source type.

You can re-encode a BD file between 15 to 32 GB to about 4GB and still have good picture quality. However, I would suggest only doing DTS or DD 5.1 sound rather than doing HD sound since a DTSMA or TrueHD sound track can be over 10GB.



You'll start noticing degrading PQ with bigger HDTV's. I used to worried about space when I started ripping my movies / tv shows. Thereafter, I did some research and ended up building an UnRaid server. At the moment I've got 15 TB, and I will be adding 3 TB more since I'm running out of space. BD movies with HD sound tracks take some space.
You shouldn't give a final file size due to differing source material. Things like darkness level, motion level, grain level and noise level are just a few things that will affect final file size if all other things are equal.

The closest HD audio, non LPCM I've ever seen at that size are the extended editions of LotR's.

And that's my question. Just how good is good quality? Obviously it's no longer BD quality, but how much better than up-scaled dvd quality is it? Going through all my ripped TV shows just now, it really depends on how the darn show was filmed. A show like Haven looks quite a bit softer than it's BD counterpart, but a show like Lost is downright sharp on the reg dvd version. I'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between reg and BD so why purchase a BD of it and compress it? Not trying to be argumentative here, just curious what everyone thinks about this.
Because you can always do a lot more, when talking about recompression, when you are cutting vs adding. Taking bits away is so much simpler than adding "phantom" bits.

You may want to avoid a 3 TB drive if possible. The Backblaze hard drive report showed an abnormally high failure rate of 3 TB drives as opposed to other sizes:

https://www.backblaze.com/blog/best-hard-drive/
I've been running 3tb Reds 24/7 since they've come out.

I highly doubt that. Not for ripping. However, Home Theater equipment then I do agree. I've got a lot to learn for that.
Do you know what the effects are when tweaking --keyint, VBV, --aq, --dct-decimate, or any number of x264 options do to a non-grainy dark source? How about to a lightly colored static source? If the answer is no to any of these, then you shouldn't make statements like that because people reading your posts will be more apt to believe what you post even if it isn't true.
 

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I'll need to check my Akira BD. That has a six channel 24/192 track. And I have a couple of Chris Botti BDs that have 24/96 six channel tracks I can look at.
I could have done that for you real quick if I had noticed this...

192kHz TrueHD track demuxed: 12.4GB
192kHz TrueHD track converted to FLAC: 12.1GB
 

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I could have done that for you real quick if I had noticed this...

192kHz TrueHD track demuxed: 12.4GB
192kHz TrueHD track converted to FLAC: 12.1GB
The BD info program showed that it was under 10GB for just the Japanese Dolby True HD track for just the movie. But if the two English True HD tracks are added then the total audio file size goes over 12GB for the movie.
 

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The BD info program showed that it was under 10GB for just the Japanese Dolby True HD track for just the movie. But if the two English True HD tracks are added then the total audio file size goes over 12GB for the movie.
This is the for the JAP audio track. I would ***** slap anyone that listens to that horrible translated ENG track.
 

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This is the for the JAP audio track. I would ***** slap anyone that listens to that horrible translated ENG track.
SO is there a difference between the 25th Anniversary and the original maybe? I was going by the information that the BDinfo program showed me. So I'm wondering if the BDinfo program does not give the proper sizes?

I used to have a copy of the original BD release but I misplaced it so I purchased the 25th Anniversary version to replace it last year.
 

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SO is there a difference between the 25th Anniversary and the original maybe? I was going by the information that the BDinfo program showed me. So I'm wondering if the BDinfo program does not give the proper sizes?

I used to have a copy of the original BD release but I misplaced it so I purchased the 25th Anniversary version to replace it last year.
AHHHH!!!!! I did not know you guys were talking about the 25th Anniv. Edition.

Yes, big difference! Audio bit rates are lower on he new one. The framing has been fixed in the new one but they added a bit (a lot) of EE. The video rate on the new is more than (EDIT-my mistake) just 2MB higher, BUT...I like it the old one much better.

The original version has true 24bit audio (people always believed it was fake..16bit-to-24bit) but the FLAC conversion would have stripped the padding. So the fact that both the True-HD and the FLAC are almost identical shows that they are both real 24-bit.

EDIT - the bitrate of the video is NOT twice as big. I was looking at wrong number.
 

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Can someone point me in the direction of how to manage forced subs? I use the wdtv live smp, using dvdfabhd, main-movie BD ISO. I don't mind using MKV either. I'm looking for an easy solution without loosing any picture quality. Screenshots definitely help :)
thanks.
 

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Can someone point me in the direction of how to manage forced subs? I use the wdtv live smp, using dvdfabhd, main-movie BD ISO. I don't mind using MKV either. I'm looking for an easy solution without loosing any picture quality. Screenshots definitely help :)
thanks.
There is no easy solution. The first question is what types of forced subs, if any, your playback device supports. I'm not familiar with the WDTV Live SMP so I hope someone else can answer that. Once we figure that out we can give a lot better advice.
 

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I didnt know there were different types of forced subs. How can i find this out?
By searching back in this thread. This subject has been discussed extensively several times. It seems it comes up every couple months.

We should probably just start a thread dedicated to forced subs so people don't have to repeat themselves.

Summary: There are 3 types of forced subs to deal with. The Live-SMP doesn't handle forced subs (I have 3). You need to separate the forced subs into their own track and mux them in first in line. Then when you play the title, press the sub button once to pick the first sub track and you have your forced subs.

Search back to the last forced sub discussion for the rest.
 
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As far as forced subs is concerned, in my case if I always view movies with subs, I won't have to be bothered with forced subs, right?
 

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We should probably just start a thread dedicated to forced subs so people don't have to repeat themselves.
And how would that thread be any different? ;)
 
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