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What is the difference in HDTV-ready, HDTV-compatible, digital TV, and HDTV? Are all HDTV digital? http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/confused.gif


Are there websites for neophytes??


Secondly, is there a site comparing the features by models/manuf so that one can weigh various options?


Simply put, I'd like to get myself a HDTV and I don't wish to buy a set that'd become obsoleted in a few short months. Are we in a cusp of a technological change in the HDTV technology, and one should simply wait a few months...



essbee
 

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well I can talckle the first part of your question. HDTV-Ready means that the TV comes with a tuner built in I believe. There aren't to many TV's like that. HDTV Compatible means that you can easilly hook it up to a tuner that you buy seperately. For the most part compatible is prefered so you aren't stuck with a tuner you don't want.


To tackle the DTV, HDTV part you have to understand SDTV first. SDTV (Standard Definition Television) is what most of the US watches which is at a resolution of 480i, and its an Analog signal.


DTV (Digital TV) gets broadcasted . . . well . . . digitally as opposed to an analog signal with resolutions of 480p to 1080i.


HDTV (High Definition Television) is a specific piece of DTV. It uses resolution 720p or 1080i. Basically its the best in DTV. There is a 1080p, but thats only for REALLY REALY REALLY High end stuff that only companies will see for some time to come.


What does the p and the i mean? Well the I = Interlaced. When you look at a TV screen your not really seeing the whole picture. First you see the odd lines, and then u see the even lines. Lets say your tv had 6 lines. First it you would see 1, 3, and 5, and then 2, 4, and 6. It happens SO quickly (thousands of times a second) though that your eyes would never be able to see it, and think that its one whole image.


P = Progreesive. Basically instead of showing you half the image and then the other half, it shows it to you all at once giving you a better image. Your computer your looking at is probably using progressive.


As far as the obsolete part . . . well thats up in the air. New TV's will be coming with firewire, and there is going to be an odd period where some tv's will have a certain connection, and will work with certain equipment, and other tv's will work with other equipment. Only time will tell who wins.


------------------

STOP DVI/HDCP!!!!!
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by spare_brain:
What is the difference in HDTV-ready, HDTV-compatible, digital TV, and HDTV? Are all HDTV digital? http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/confused.gif
The terms you mention above have no hard and fast rules what they mean. Most are just marketing terms, but I think these are acceptable definitions:


digital TV - Any TV that can handle the higher refresh rates that digital TV demands. Similar to a computer monitor.

HDTV-ready / HDTV-compatible - Pretty much the same meaning. Any TV that is classified as these will be able to display some form HDTV. It is a digital TV that can display 720p or 1080i signal, which is at the higher end of the digital TV options. These TV will require a "set-top" box to tune in the digital signal. Much like old TVs that only could go to channel 13 need a cable box to tune the additional channels.


HDTV - This is all of the above with the tuner added. There are very few of these sets.

Quote:


Are there websites for neophytes??

Secondly, is there a site comparing the features by models/manuf so that one can weigh various options?
This is a great site. Sometimes it gets a little advanced, but most people are willing to explain if you ask. There is not a HD set made that isn't represented on this forum.

Quote:


Simply put, I'd like to get myself a HDTV and I don't wish to buy a set that'd become obsoleted in a few short months. Are we in a cusp of a technological change in the HDTV technology, and one should simply wait a few months...
This is a tough question. I think it comes down to money. If you were looking to spend about $1,000 or more you have to consider a digital TV. If you were just looking to spend a few hundred I think I would wait. It is possible that a digital TV you buy today will become obsolete, but that always exists with technology. Of course the TV won't be useless, just behind the times. Keep asking questions here and learn as much as you can.


Joe


[This message has been edited by JoeCraw (edited 07-15-2001).]
 
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