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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This room is for Home Theater. Not the best set up. The bookcase was here when I purchased the house. I need your help with room acoustics and advise if I can keep the bookshelf speaker system for it looks best with bookshelf speakers and they are not in the way as a floor monitor would be. That being said, I am open to using floor monitors, but they would have to be placed right up against the bookcase shelf to keep people from running into them when entering the room.


What's your thoughts?


1.By adding this piece of room treatment here and here and here, you should be fine with the bookshelf. (Please provide the name, style and where to place such piece in my room. A link to the company would be very helpful).


2.No mater what room treatment you add, the bookshelf speaker will never sound as good as a floor monitor, even having the floor monitor placed right up against the bookshelf. With the floor monitor ad room treatment here and here and here, etc.


3.Because of that large bookcase, swapping out to floor monitors will not solve the problem. You will have to move the monitors out away from the bookcase. (That will make the speakers too close to my sofa, people will run into them, so that option will not work).


I'm open to up grading all the speakers if you have suggestions. Actually I'd like to. Something with a better center. (The new sub, JL f113 will be replacing the current Velodyne).







 

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You need something like this to help isolate the speakers from the bookcase

http://www.auralex.com/sound_isolati...tion_mopad.asp


The bookcase itself is not really an issue otherwise. The b&w's should be crossed at 80hz or 100hz.


As far as actual room acoustics go, the fireplace is where you would want absorber panels and the left side (of the tv) is open so you can't put anything there either. There isn't much you can do acoustically without altering the room significantly.
 

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Nice looking place. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to retrofit acoustic treatments into many rooms without destroying the look of the room and I have not really seen any houses that are built with acoustics in mind. Most of the time it is just luck if the room works out. Luck comes in 2 flavors and it isn't usually vanilla.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rfc_2002 /forum/post/18234965


2.No mater what room treatment you add, the bookshelf speaker will never sound as good as a floor monitor

I disagree with that. Since you have a sub, good (emphasis on good) bookshelf speakers can be perfectly fine.


One big problem I see is you're sitting right in front of a reflecting window. So treatment is needed there for sure.


--Ethan
 

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"Monitor" is typically used to refer to a particular type of speaker used in recording / sound track mixing studios, and from what i've seen are typically not floorstanding models, but rather (large-ish) bookshelf speakers. They often have amplifiers built-in for optimal mating of amplifier attributes to the speaker design.


Floorstanding speakers typically include a larger woofer than a typical bookshelf speaker has, and thus are typically capable of producing lower frequencies than bookshelf speakers. If you have a good subwoofer though, you would normally set up your system so that the subwoofer takes care of the lower frequencies. In that case, a floorstanding speaker's advantage in the lower frequencies over a bookshelf speaker is diminished.


If you are mostly into listening to 2-channel music, floorstanding models may provide a better experience according to what i've read. For mostly movie watching though, bookshelves with a capable subwoofer should do just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse S /forum/post/18235558


You need something like this to help isolate the speakers from the bookcase

http://www.auralex.com/sound_isolati...tion_mopad.asp


The bookcase itself is not really an issue otherwise. The b&w's should be crossed at 80hz or 100hz.


As far as actual room acoustics go, the fireplace is where you would want absorber panels and the left side (of the tv) is open so you can't put anything there either. There isn't much you can do acoustically without altering the room significantly.

Jesse,

I have 3 Vibrapod's under each 805.

I don't have much space. Your thoughts on those vs the auralex?

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethan Winer /forum/post/18235697


I disagree with that. Since you have a sub, good (emphasis on good) bookshelf speakers can be perfectly fine.


One big problem I see is you're sitting right in front of a reflecting window. So treatment is needed there for sure.


--Ethan

Hey Ethan,

I have wooden slat binds that I close when HT is in use. They provide a diffused surface. Not good enough?


I could hang drapes, over the wooden blinds. Would that be helpful? Soild panels are not an option, as I need, want the sunlight.


I see you live in New Milford CT. I grew up in Milford CT. Same place?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gertjan /forum/post/18235820


"Monitor" is typically used to refer to a particular type of speaker used in recording / sound track mixing studios, and from what i've seen are typically not floorstanding models, but rather (large-ish) bookshelf speakers. They often have amplifiers built-in for optimal mating of amplifier attributes to the speaker design.


Floorstanding speakers typically include a larger woofer than a typical bookshelf speaker has, and thus are typically capable of producing lower frequencies than bookshelf speakers. If you have a good subwoofer though, you would normally set up your system so that the subwoofer takes care of the lower frequencies. In that case, a floorstanding speaker's advantage in the lower frequencies over a bookshelf speaker is diminished.


If you are mostly into listening to 2-channel music, floorstanding models may provide a better experience according to what i've read. For mostly movie watching though, bookshelves with a capable subwoofer should do just fine.

Thanks for explaining what a "monitor" is. On a site like this, I'm sure I use terms that are not correct, misleading. It's a learning thing for some of us. Now I know and the next time I refer to a speaker, I will be better informed and more precise as to what I'm talking about. Thank you. Being I'm not using this room for 2-channel music, it's hopeful that a bookshelf with my JL f113 will work just as well as a floor standing speaker. Hopefully some room tweaking will help out.
 

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Happy to help
So as far as i know, #2 and #3 on your list really aren't applicable / things to worry about.


That leaves #1 - room treatments.


Ethan already pointed out the big problem of the reflective windows behind the main seat. I assume those blinds are open at times to provide light into the room etc, and that you cannot put anything permanent in front of them?


Also - i ain't no expert, but from what i've learned this far on the subject, you may want to look into putting some absorption behind the front speakers, and some on your ceiling on the first reflection point there (the midway point on the ceiling between your speakers and your ears). Absorption should probably be in the form of something like a 1" thick piece of rigid fiberglass. You can wrap it in nice looking fabric (as long as it's acoustically transparent) to make it fit in with the decor.


One other thing i noticed: In the pictures, it looks like your center channel is laying flat on its bottom. You may get some improvement if you angle it up towards the seating position so that it points at your ears while seated. Try it and see...


If you can, you should see about taking measurements using an SPL meter and preferably some computer software. That will make visible what your situation is, and what you need to focus on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by gertjan /forum/post/18237083


happy to help



ethan already pointed out the big problem of the reflective windows behind the main seat. I assume those blinds are open at times to provide light into the room etc, and that you cannot put anything permanent in front of them?


Also - i ain't no expert, but from what i've learned this far on the subject, you may want to look into putting some absorption behind the front speakers, and some on your ceiling on the first reflection point there (the midway point on the ceiling between your speakers and your ears). Absorption should probably be in the form of something like a 1" thick piece of rigid fiberglass. You can wrap it in nice looking fabric (as long as it's acoustically transparent) to make it fit in with the decor.


One other thing i noticed: In the pictures, it looks like your center channel is laying flat on its bottom. You may get some improvement if you angle it up towards the seating position so that it points at your ears while seated. Try it and see...


If you can, you should see about taking measurements using an spl meter and preferably some computer software. That will make visible what your situation is, and what you need to focus on.

"reflective windows" you're referring to the wooden blinds? They are always closed when ht is on.

No, nothing permanent.

Would drapes help out? Covering the side window and the three behind the sofa?

What's the difference between using drapes and absorption boards?


I'm open to putting something behind the front speakers. What, and maybe a link to that product.

Sealing is going to be a hard sell.


The center is in it's correct mounting position. I can angle it up a bit and will try that.


what computer software?

I just purchased an anthem statement d2v processor. I will be using the arc. Is that what you're referring to?


Cheers!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rfc_2002 /forum/post/18237700


"reflective windows" you're referring to the wooden blinds? They are always closed when ht is on.

No, nothing permanent.

Would drapes help out? Covering the side window and the three behind the sofa?

What's the difference between using drapes and absorption boards?


I'm open to putting something behind the front speakers. What, and maybe a link to that product.

Sealing is going to be a hard sell.

You should read the various resources in this thread under "Sound Treatments and Acoustics". There's a lot to read there, and you'll learn a lot.

Quote:
The center is in it's correct mounting position. I can angle it up a bit and will try that.

Let us know how it goes


Quote:
what computer software?

There are various applications out there. I'm only familiar with Room Equalization Wizard, which can be found here .
Quote:
I just purchased an anthem statement d2v processor. I will be using the arc. Is that what you're referring to?

I'm not terribly familiar with those. From the little bit i've read about them, those seem to be things that help you EQ your speakers automatically. If you read the various articles i pointed you to, you'll learn that EQ is good, but not the one answer to achieving good audio.


Good luck! Take your time to read. You'll find it's worth it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rfc_2002 /forum/post/18237700


what computer software?

I just purchased an anthem statement d2v processor. I will be using the arc. Is that what you're referring to?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gertjan /forum/post/18237954


I'm not terribly familiar with those. From the little bit i've read about them, those seem to be things that help you EQ your speakers automatically. If you read the various articles i pointed you to, you'll learn that EQ is good, but not the one answer to achieving good audio.

One advantage of ARC is that it will show you the in-room response of each speaker based on multiple sampled microphone positions. This can be an aid in setup, positioning and room-treatment as well as for EQ.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rfc_2002 /forum/post/18235907


I have wooden slat binds that I close when HT is in use. They provide a diffused surface. Not good enough?

Right, not good enough.


Quote:
I could hang drapes, over the wooden blinds. Would that be helpful?

Maybe if they're REALLY thick and absorbent.

Quote:
I see you live in New Milford CT. I grew up in Milford CT. Same place?

New Milford is just north of Danbury, about an hour away from Milford.


--Ethan
 
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