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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys...


I think I am finally happy with my speaker setup and placement... I have dialed in the system as much as I think I can. There are a few things I would like to improve...


1) My bass is still a tad boomy or not enough...


2) I want to do something to make my speakers a tad more crisp..they are very good but I have heard my speakers sound even better....I want that. (It could be my power source too... I am just using an Onkyo 818...)


That being said... I was suggested to get a subdude...then was thinking of getting bass traps in front two corners and two traps behind the L/R speaker...


Room is 12 x 22.


Thanks in advance!
 

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Bass traps make a HUGE improvement.

I have bass traps on all wall corners,ceiling corners and back wall.

They actuall get the bottomend under control thus cleaning it up and freeing up the mids and highs.

I'd also use acoustic panels at your first reflections also.

Real traps or Gik acoustics have lots of info and video so you can hear the difference and you do hear the difference and its not suttle,glad I have mine.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newbie01  /t/1469528/room-treatments-i-hope-this-is-the-right-forum#post_23233891


Hi guys...


I think I am finally happy with my speaker setup and placement... I have dialed in the system as much as I think I can. There are a few things I would like to improve...


1) My bass is still a tad boomy or not enough...


2) I want to do something to make my speakers a tad more crisp..they are very good but I have heard my speakers sound even better....I want that. (It could be my power source too... I am just using an Onkyo 818...)


That being said... I was suggested to get a subdude...then was thinking of getting bass traps in front two corners and two traps behind the L/R speaker...


Room is 12 x 22.


Thanks in advance!

For a simple comparison between a treated and an untreated room, check this out: http://gikacoustics.com/audio-examples-treated-vs-untreated-room/


The boominess and thinness are both symptoms of untreated rooms. Certain frequencies will be quieter, certain ones will be more prominent and linger. Bass traps in the front corners will help with the boominess - the thinner bass sounds are usually either caused by the speaker position or caused by modes / your position in the room. So panels behind the speakers will help with that if the speaker position is causing it, thicker panels on the back wall will help if modes are causing it.


"Crisp" sound from your speakers is usually blurred by reflections, especially first reflections. I would look to treating those points on your sidewalls (and on your ceiling if possible). You can find your first reflection points by using the "mirror trick" outlined in this video: http://gikacoustics.com/video-early-first-reflection-points/
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think some of this is that I own the Phil 2's which has an open back mid...thus is supposed to create a dispersed backward sound pattern to give more full sound stage.


In my room...this is not optimum at this time. I have corrected this some by putting more fill in the back to lessen the rearward sound projection but to some extent I am handicapping my speakers by doing so.


Not to get stupid..but what kind of budget are we talking for an average room with room treatments? What are the more inexpensive options?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newbie01  /t/1469528/room-treatments-i-hope-this-is-the-right-forum#post_23233891


I was suggested to get a subdude.

That won't do much if anything. Put the money into more bass traps.
Quote:
was thinking of getting bass traps in front two corners and two traps behind the L/R speaker. Room is 12 x 22.

A room that size needs more than just four bass traps. Further, putting traps directly behind the speakers is not useful. However many you can manage, whether DIY or commercial products, stick with the corners. This short article is mainly about home recording, but all the same principles apply to hi-fi and home theater too:

Acoustic Basics


--Ethan
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newbie01  /t/1469528/room-treatments-i-hope-this-is-the-right-forum/0_100#post_23233891


...1) My bass is still a tad boomy or not enough...


2) I want to do something to make my speakers a tad more crisp.....I have heard my speakers sound even better....

"A tad boomy or not enough" isn't very informative. While a measurement rig is a lot to ask, it's not unreasonable to run a test disk of some sort that contains LF test signals. These allow you to identify the frequencies that are "boomy" or "not enough." Move around while you do it as the frequencies of excess/deficit may change from one seat to another. Statements like "I've got a big peak at 50Hz, and dips at 75Hz and 120Hz" tell us what sort of freqeuncy range and so what sort of treatments might be effective. That's where improvement starts.


If you've heard your speakers sound better, what was different; amp? room? The reason I ask is that taste and preference vary. Open back speakers seek to blur spatial locations by increasing indirect sound levels, while terms like "crisp" get associated with tight or pinpoint imaging, achieved by reducing indirect sound. Understand your goal or you may find "good" advice leads you in the opposite direction to where you want to be.


HAve fun,

Frank
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newbie01  /t/1469528/room-treatments-i-hope-this-is-the-right-forum#post_23235946


I think some of this is that I own the Phil 2's which has an open back mid...thus is supposed to create a dispersed backward sound pattern to give more full sound stage.


In my room...this is not optimum at this time. I have corrected this some by putting more fill in the back to lessen the rearward sound projection but to some extent I am handicapping my speakers by doing so.


Not to get stupid..but what kind of budget are we talking for an average room with room treatments? What are the more inexpensive options?

If the speakers are dispersing sound backwards as well, then absorption behind the speaker would help but would not actually be too great an option as you would be negating some of the good things about the speakers. Of course, if its causing problems, absorption would be helpful, but there are better ways to deal with it. Diffusion behind the speakers would help spread that sound out evenly around the room instead of keeping with the few loud reflections its getting from the front wall.


A typical room budget varies completely based on location, size of the room, preferences, problems, DIY or commercial products, etc. I would think you could get a huge improvement out of corner traps in the front, early reflection treatment, and thicker treatment on the back wall to address the modal nulls. This could be done without spending thousands. Treating in stages can be helpful to make sure you aren't purchasing anything you don't need and so you can hone in on problems better.

http://gikacoustics.com/acoustic-advice/ shows a typical higher budget room. Obviously, depending on budget and expectations, you could work out something a lot less intrusive on the space.
 
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